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THE PLAY 

What is it then? 

A little living with a little play, 

A little laughter in a dreary day, 

A hasly tear: and then a wanderer's way 

Through paths unknown 

Where all alone 

We act our part, 

Nor know from start 

To finish where we go 

Or why, save that there blow 

From some far land, 

Across a dim and distant strand, 

The echoes of a mighty band 

That have been men. 

Armed with the Strength of what has been, 
Clad in the hope of things unseen, 
We casl our lot with the moving play 
As it folds our lives into yesterday. 

Anne R. Trott 







JJAtcatefc fotlAmor & 
of 

th* u Cmigro*M> of %t; dtotf 

foUttnt/eqwrtt* „ 

It tahss iife-to hfte life 





iiFcomi®. I? asm. 



We, the students, present annually our 
college play, one year of life on this campus. 

The actors are as varied as the places 
from which they come. They have, how- 
ever, one thing in common, the wish for 
success. It is a swift play. Mistakes must 
be corrected even as they are made; there 
is no time to rehearse our parts. The 
directions must be given as the play moves 
on, and their effectiveness can be judged 
only by the smoothness of the subsequent 
action. 

In this book we have tried to give per- 
manence to some suggestive scenes from 
our passing drama of 1930-1931. 





-^-^ 




Teach me, O Lord, the way of thy Statutes; 

and I shall keep it unto the end. 

Give me understanding, and I shall keep 

thy law; yea, I shall observe it with 

my whole heart. 

Make me to go in the path of thy commandments; 

for therein do 1 delight. 

Psalms I 19: 33, 34, 35. 



And It Was Called Day 

Morning sits quietly, somberly. 

Rut wide-awake. 

Beside a dark pool in the woods. 

Watching wet dragon flies 

Dry themselves. Water lilies 

W ake and smile up at her. 

A soft, playful breeze 

Ruffles her hair and dress 

As she smiles back at the lilies. 



Noon lolls lazily, sleepily 

At the foot of a hay-cock. 

And yawns as he shoves 

The heel of his boot 

Into the roots of the hay-stubble. 

The clouds overhead 

Are like huge pirate-ships. 

Rut he is too droivsy to go adventuring. 

Resides, the sun is too bright — 

It hurts his eyes to look up. 

Dusk trudges slowly, wearily 

Up the well-worn path — 

The implements of his days work 

Across his shoulder. The gray dust 

From the fields and hay sifts off him. 

He reaches home and stands on his threshold, 

Gazing back across his fields. 

Seeing all, yet only half. 

Throwing down his tools, he settles 

Himself with his pipe, and draws 

Across his weary shoulders 

A dark, worn, old coat — 

For it has grown cool. 

— Sarah Dutrow 




Jackson Torch 




South Lawn 




Harrison Haii 




Maury Hall 




HlLLCRES I 




Practice House 




The South Arch 




At the Ninth Tee 




Cleveland Co - j i age 




The Little Gate 




Some day perhaps 

I shan't even care 

Whether that stately row of poplars 

Shall be clothed gracefully in green 

( )r whether a soft breeze 

Shall make them sway in one direction. 

Rut now, when they 

Are brazenly immodest 

In their nakedness 

And let the light from yonder moon 

Shine through them, 

Something in the silhouetted hlc 

Calls forth a protest against my 

Loneliness. 

1 would that spring would come. 

— Sarah Dutrow 








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BSfc. - - 

IK 

■ 



"That our daughters may be as cornerstones, 
polished after the similitude of a palace." 




WALTER rOHN GIFFORD 

A. B., A. >[., Ph. D. 

Professor of Education; Dean of 
the College 

A. I!.. Oberlin College: A. M., Ph. I)., 
Columbia University. 



HENRY A CONVERSE 
A. B., Ph. D. 

Professor of Mathematics; Registrar 

A. B., Hampden-Sidney College; Ph. !>.. 
Johns Hopkins University. 





FLORENCE E. BOEHMER 
B. A., M. A. 

Dean of Women 

V.. A., Drury College; M. A., Illinois 
University. 



LULU E. COE 
B. A., M. A. 

Assistant Dean of Women 

Jl. A., Bucknell University; M. A.. Teach- 
ers College, Columbia University. 





GEORGE WARREN 

CHAPPELEAR 

B. S., M. S. 

Professor of Biology 
15. S., M. S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute 



lOHN WALTER WAYLAND 
A. B., Ph. D. 

Professor of History and Social 
Sciences 

A. 1!., Bridgewater College; Ph. I)., I'm 
versity of Virginia. 





RAYMOND CARLYLE 
DINGLEDINE 

B. S„ M. S. 

Professor of History and Social 
Sciences 

B. S., M. S., University of Virginia; 
student, Johns Hopkins University. 



rOHN N. McILWRAITH 

B. S., A. M. 

Professor of History and Social 
Sciences 

B. S., A. M., Teachers College, Colum- 
bia University; graduate, State Normal 
School, Bridgewater, Mass.; student, Har- 
vard University. 





ELIZABETH PENDLETON 

CLEVELAND 

A. B., A. M. 

Professor of French 

A. B., Hollins College; A. M., University 
of Virginia. 



JOHN A. SAWHILL 
A. B., A. M., Ph. D. 

Professor of Latin and Greek 

A. B., University of Colorado; A. M., 
Ph. D., Princeton University. 





RAUS McDILL HANSON 
B. S„ A. M. 

Associate Professor of Social 
Sciences 

B. S., Nebraska Wesleyan University; A. 
M., University of Nebraska; student, King's 
College. University of London. 



WILLIETTE E. HOPKINS 
Supervisor of Dormitories 











MARIE LOUISE BOJE 
A. B., A. M. 

Associate Professor of English 

A. 1!.. Western Reserve University; 
M., Columbia University; student, Cle 1 
land School of Education. 



MARGARET VANCE HOI-TM \\ 
A. B., M. A. 

Associate Professor oj English 

Graduate, Massanutten Academy; B. A., 
Hood College; student, Syracuse University 
(summer); Teacher- College, Columbia Uni- 
versity; M. A.. University of Pennsylvania, 





CONRAD TRAVIS LOG \.\ 
A. B., A. M. 

Professor of English 

A. B., Randolph-Macon College; A. jr.. 
Columbia University; graduate student, 
Teacher^ College, Columbia University. 



CHARLES HERBERT 
HUFFMAN 

A. B., A. M.. 1'h. D. 

Professor of English 

A. P... Bridgewater College; A. M., Clark 
University; I'h. I).. University of Virginia. 








X \.\CY BYRD RUEBUSH 
I'h. 1!.. A. M. 

Instructor in I-.uglish 

I'h. I',., A. M., Elon College; A. M., 
University of Virginia; student, Oxford 
University, England. 



Rl'TH SMOOT Hl'DSON 
B. O. 

Instructor in English and Expression 

Graduate, Luray College; B. O., Bard- 
Avon School of Expression; student. Syra- 
cuse University (summer session). 










VV'V'V'V'V' 





ALICE MARY AIKEN 
B. S. ( A. M. 

Professor of Fine Arts 

Graduate, College of Industrial Arts, State 
College, Denton, Texas; student, Art Insti- 
tute of Chicago (summers) ; B. S., A. M., 
Teachers College, Columbia University. 



GRACE MARGARET PALMER 
A. B., Ph. B., M. A. 

Associate Professor of Fine Arts 

A. B., Kansas State Teachers College ; 
Ph. B., University of Chicago ; M. A., 
Teachers College, Columbia University. 





CLYDE P. SHORTS 
A. B. 

Associate Professor of Education 

Graduate, Edinboro State Normal, Edin- 
boro, Pa.; A. B., University of Pittsburgh; 
student, Pittsburgh School of Childhood; 
student, University of Wisconsin ; student. 
Teachers College, Columbia University. 



CLARA G. TURNER 
B. S., A. M. 

Dietitian and Director of the Dining 

Hall ; Associate Professor of 

Home Economics 



Graduate, Mt. 
Sackville, X. R.; 
University. 



Allison Ladies* College, 
B. S.. A. M., Columbia 





MARY LOUISE SEEGER 
B. S., A. M. 

Associate Professor of Education 

Diploma, Kindergarten Training School, 
Indianapolis, Indiana; diploma, Kindergar- 
ten Supervision, Teachers College, Colum- 
bia University; B. S., A. M., Teachers Col- 
lege, Columbia University. 



BESSIE TOHNSON LANTER 
A. B., A. M. 

,-lssociate Professor of Education 

Graduate, Hamilton College (Junior Col- 
lege), Lexington, Ky. ; student, University 
of Kentucky (summers) ; A. B., Transyl- 
vania College; A. M., College of Education, 
University of Chicago. 








EDNA TROUT SHAEFFER 

Director of Music: Instructor in 

School Music 

Pupil of Dennee, New England Conser- 
vatory of Music, Boston: student, School of 
Music and Pipe Organ, Teachers College, 
Columbia University. 



CLARA WHIPPLE COURNYN 
Instructor in Music 

Graduate of New England Conservatory 

of Music under Clarence li. Shirley; pupil 
of William Whitney of New York and 
Boston; pupil of M. Alexis Ghasne of Paris 
Opera-Comique, Paris. France. 





GLADYS E. MICHAELS 

Instructor in Music 

Graduate, New England Conservatory of 
Music. 



EUNICE LEA KETTERING 

Instructor in Music 

Bachelor of Music, Oberlin Conservatory 
of Music, Oberlin, Ohio; Fellow, American 

(■iiilil ot I Ir.uanists. 





LOUISE HOSMER 
B. M. 

Instructor in Music 

B. M., Carlton College; student, Oberlin 
t onservatory of Music. 



JAMES A. HARM AN 

Instructor in Stringed Instruments ; 
Director oj Orchestra 

Student, Dana's Musical Institute; cer- 
tificate. National Academy of Music. 





HOWELL GRADY PICKETT 
B. S., M. S„ Ph. D. 

Professor of Chemistry 

B. S., M. S., Ph. D., University of North 
Carolina. 



C. E. NORMAND 
A. B., M. A., Ph. D. 

Professor of Physics 

A. B., M. A., University of Texas; Ph. 
D., University of California. 





PEARL POWERS MOODY 
B. S., A. M. 

Professor of Home Economics 

Graduate, Tuscaloosa Female College; 
student, University of Alabama, Summer 
School of the South; graduate, State Nor- 
mal School, Florence, Alabama; B. S., 
George Peabody College for Teachers; A. 
M., Teachers College, Columbia University. 



MYRTLE L. WILSON 
B. S.. A. M. 

Associate Professor of Home 
Economics 

B. S-, A. M., Teachers College, Colum- 
bia University; graduate, Michigan State 
Normal College, Ypsilanti, Michigan. 





TULIA ROBERTSON 
B. S., M. A. 

Associate Professor of Home 
Economics 

B. S., George Peabody College for Teach- 
ers; M. A., Teachers College, Columbia 
University. 



ADELE RAYMOND 

BLACKWELL 

B. S., M. A. 

Associate Professor of Home 
Economics 



B. S., M. A., 
for Teachers. 



George Peabody College 





RUTH L. PHILLIPS 
A. B., M. A., Ph. D. 

Professor of Biology 

A. B., M. A., Ph. I)., Syracuse Univer- 
sity. Student and research worker, Marine 
Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, Mass.; 
graduate student, University of Cincinnati 
and University of Pennsylvania Medical 
School. 



M. DORISSE HOWE 
A. B., M. A., Ph. D. 

Associate Professor of Biology 

A. B., M. A., Syracuse University; Ph. 
I>., University of Chicago. 



S A 




KL4I 




RACHEL F. WEEMS 

M. D. 

Professor of Health Education 

M. D„, Medical College of Virginia; grad- 
uate, State Teachers College, Harrisonburg; 
student, Westhampton College and the Uni- 
versity of Virginia (summer quarters). 



MARY R. WAPLES 

R. N. 

Instructor in School and Home 
Nursing 

Graduate, Johnston-Willis Sanatorium; 
student. Woman's College, Richmond. 





ALTHEA L. TOHNSTON 
A. B„ A. M. 

Associate Professor of Health 
Education 

Graduate, Manassas Institute; student, 
Hanover College, Indiana ; A. B., Carroll 
College, Wisconsin; A. M., Columbia Uni- 
versity. 



HELEN MARBUT 
B. S., M. A. 

Assistant Professor of Health 
Education 

13. S., University of Missouri; M. A., 
Teachers College, Columbia University. 














MIUIAM FARIES 
A. B., M. A. 

Assistant Professor of Pliysical 
Education 

A. It., Bryn Mawr College; M. A., Teach- 
ers College, Columbia University. 



VIRGINIA HARNSBEKIiER* 
A. B. 

Librarian; Instructor in Library 
Methods 

A. B., Randolph-Macon Woman's College; 
Certificate, Pratt Institute School of Library- 
Science. 





PEARL O'NEAL 
B. A. 

Assistant Librarian; Instructor in 
Library Methods 

B. A., University of Richmond; B. A. in 
Library Science, Emory University; grad- 
uate work, University of Chicago; Colum- 
bia University. 



KATHERINE MINER ANTHONY 
B. S. ( A. M. 

Professor of Education ; Director of 
Training School 

Graduate, State Normal School, Livings- 
ton, Alabama; B. S., A. M., George Pea- 
body College for Teachers; student, Uni- 
versity of Tennessee, Lake Chautauqua, N. 
Y.j and Teachers College, Columbia Univer- 
sity (summer sessions) ; student, University 
of Chicago. 





VIRGINIA BUCHANAN 
B. S, A. M. 

Associate Professor Education ; 

Assistant Director of Training 

School 

B. S., State Teachers College, Harrison- 
burg; student, George Peabody College for 
Teachers; A. M., Teachers College, Colum- 
bia University. 



LILLIE BELLE STAPLES 
Supervisor of Kindergarten 

Graduate of State Teachers College, Cape 
Girardeau, Mo. 















CALLIE GIVENS HYATT 
B. S. 

Supervisor First Grade 

II. S., George Peabody College for Teach- 
ers; graduate of Davenport College; student, 
Appalachian Training School. 



LENA REDFE \KN 
A. B. 

Supervisor hirst Grade 

Graduate of Appalachian Normal School. 
Boone, N. C; A. IS., East Carolina Teach- 
er-- College; student, George Peabody Col- 
lege for Teachers. 



KITH THOMPSON. A. B. 
Supervisor of Second Grade 

A, I'.., Shorter College, Rome, ( la. ; stu- 
ent, (leorge Peabody College for Teachers. 



lucille Mclaughlin 
b. s. 

Supervisor of Third Grade 

Ji. S., State Teachers College, Harrison- 
burg. 



m 






GLADYS GOODMAN 
B. S. 

Supervisor of Fourth Grade 

B. S,, State Teachers College, Harrison- 
burg; student, George Peabody College for 
Teachers. 



ALICE FOWLER 
A. B. 

Supervisor Fifth Grade 
A. B., University of Kentucky. 





LAVADA RATLIFF 
A. B. 

Supervisor, Ungraded Class 

Graduate, North Texas State Teachers 
College, Denton, Texas; student, South- 
western State Teachers College, Weather- 
ford, Okla.; A. B., Colorado State Teach- 
ers College, Greeley, Col. 



LUCIBEL CROOKSHANK 
B. S., M. A. 

Supervisor of Fifth Grade 

B. S., Teachers College, Johnson City, 
Tenn. ; M. A., George Peabody College for 
Teachers. 





MRS. W. G. LeHEW 
B. S. 

Supervisor of Sixth Grade 

B. S., State Teachers College, Harrison- 
burg, Va. ; student, Columbia University 
(summer session). 



ETHEL SPILMAN 
A. B. 

Supervisor of Junior High School 

_ A. B., Presbyterian College for Women, 
Xorth Carolina; student, University of 
Xorth Carolina (summer term). Summer 
School of the South. 





MAMIE OMOHUNDRO 
SWITZER 

B. S. 

Supervisor Junior High School 

Student, State Teachers College, Har- 
risonburg, Virginia; B. S., George Peabody 
College for Teachers; student, University 
of Virginia. 



SALLIE BLOSSER 
B. S., M. S. 

Supervisor of Junior High School 

B. S., State Teachers College, Harrison- 
burg; M. S., George Peabody College for 
Teachers. 





FRANCES HOICK 
B. S. 

Supervisor Home Economics, 
Junior High School 

V>. S., Cornell University. 



E. GENEVIEVE WARWICK 
B. S. 

Supervisor Home Economics 

B. S., State Teachers College, Harrison- 
burg, Virginia. 





VIOLETTA LORANE DAVIS 

B. S. 

Supervisor Rural Junior High School 
B. S . Harrisonburg State Teachers College. 




After Class 



Officers of Administration 



Samuel P. Duke. A. M President 

Walter J. Gifford, Ph. D Dean of the College 

Henry A. Converse, Ph. D Registrar 

Howard K. Gibbons, B. L Treasurer 

John W. Wayland, Ph. D Secretary of the Faculty 

Florence E. Boehmer, B. A., M. A Dean of Women 

Lulu E. Coe, B. A., M. A Assistant to the Dean of Women 

Rachel F. Weeais, M. D School Physician 

Mary R. Waples, R. N School Nurse 

Virginia Harnsberger, A. B.* Librarian 

Pearl O'Neal, B. A Assistant Librarian 

Clara G. Turner, A. M Dietitian and Director of the Dining Hall 

Amy J. Good Assistant to the Dietitian 

Williette E. Hopkins Supervisor of Dormitories 

Emmer F. Long Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 

Alma L. Reiter Secretary to the President 

Margaret Payne Secretary to the Dean 

Ruth Zuber Secretary to the Registrar 

Bess T. Hamaker Assistant to the Treasurer 

Lena Ralston Postmistress and Cleric 

Helen Swadley Assistant Secretary to the President 

Dorothy Garber, B. S Alumna Secretary 

*Deceased. 




The State Board of Education 

Hon. E. Lee Trinkle, Chairman Roanoke 

Judge Rose Mac Donald Berryville 

I >r. Robert M. Hughes Norfolk 

Mr. Herbert H. Harris Lynchburg 

Supt. Joseph 1 1. Saunders Newport News 

Hon. R. Walton Moore Fairfax 

Mat. Robert W. Daniel Deal 

Dr. Sidney R. Hali Richmond 

(State Superintendent of Public Instruction) 

Mr. Thos. D. Eason. Secretary Richmond 



Senior Class 





Mr. John McIlwr uth 
Honorary Member 



Miss Helen Marbui 
Big Sister 



MOTTO 
'Forward ever; backward never. 







A 


f 






f*" 


\m 


COLORS 


W / 




v 


Purple and White 









FLOWER 
Pansy 






K.VI III.KKX PlCKETT 

Mascot 








HURST 

PRES 1DENT 

SENIOR 

WINSTON Wl ' '^ l - r ^ GORE 

VICE-PRESIDENT SECRETARY 






STARK 

BUSINESS MANAGER 



BELL 

TREASURER 



Bl RD 
SER6EANT-AT- ARMS 




EDITH FLORENCE ANDES 

FORI DEFIANCE 

High School 

Art Club, 1930-'31; Alpha Literary Society, 
1927'28; Day Student-.' Club, 1928-'30; 4-H Club. 
1027-'31; V. W. C. A.; Athletic Association. 



JULIA BEATON 

ABINGDON 

Home Economics 

Martha Washington College, l928-'29j 
Literary Society; Frances Sale Club. 



Alpha 



SEE FRANCES AYRES 

PARKSLEY 

Elementary 

Breeze Staff; House Chairman of Wellington; 
Alpha Chi Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi. 





RUTH VIRGINIA BEESON 

KERNERSVILLE, N. C. 

High School 

Alpha Literary Society; Athletic Association; 
Y. W. C. A.; Euclid Club; High School Club. 



ROSA ELLEN FRITH BELL 

BRIDGETOWN 

Elementary 

Secretary and Sergeant-at-Arms Lanier Literary 
Society ; Cotillion Club; Treasurer of Senior Class; 
Senior Representative on Electoral Board. 



FRANCES BAILY BELL 

BRIDGETOWN 

Elementary 

Vice-President of Cotillion Club, 1931; Sergeant- 
at-Arms, Critic, and Secretary of Lanier Literary 
Society: Y. W. C. A. Social Committee; Choral 
Club; Athletic Association. 





REBECCA BEVERAGE 

MONTEREY 

High School 

Chemistry Assistant, 1929-'30 and '31; Chair- 
man Program Committee Euclid Club, 1929-'30: 
Honor Roll 1928, '29, '30, '31; High School Club: 
V. W. C. A.; Alpha Literary Society; Freshman 
Basketball Team; Senior Hockey Team; Senior 
Basketball Team; Athletic Association, 



GRACE LUCILLE BLALOCK 

SOUTH BOSTON 

Itiijli School 



Page Literary Society; Y. \Y. C. 
Euclid Club; Athletic Association. 



A. Cabinet ; 



KEN BIRD 

MOUNT JACKSON 

High School 

Sergeant-at-Arms Senior Class; Sergeant-at-Arms 
Lee Literary Society, *29-'30; Athletic Council, 
'29-'30; Class Swimming Team, '29-'30-'31; Varsity 
Swimming Squad, '29-'30-'31; Class Hockey, 
MO-'.Sl; Class Basketball, '30-'31; Choral Club, 
'29-'30. 











LILLIE FRANCES BLANKENBAKER 

MADISON 

High Sellout 

Y. \Y. C. A; Athletic Association; High School 
Cluh; Secretary of Euclid Club, 1929-'30; Presi- 
dent of Euclid Club, 1930-'31; Assistant House 
Chairman Ashby Hall; Alpha Literary Society. 



LENA BONES 



High School 

Vice-President Athletic Association; Student 
Council; jEolian Club; Y. \Y. C. A. ; Secretary 
Sophomore Class ; Captain Varsity Tennis Team ; 
Varsity Hockey Team; Varsity Basketball Squad, 
'2S-'31 ; Cotillion Club; Sergeant-at-Arms and 
Vice-President Lee Literary Society; Choral Club; 
Nominating Convention, '29-'31 ; Electoral Board; 
Athletic Council; Class Baseball. Tennis, and 
Hockey Teams; Tennis Sport Leader; Sophomore 
and Junior Basketball Leader. 



HENRIETTA LeGRAND BLANTON 

PETERSBURG 

Home Economics 



Frances Sale Club; 
Athletic Association; 



Y. W. C. A.; Choral Club; 
Alpha Literary Society. 

















DOROTHY BROOKS BORUM 

MAI HEWS 

High School 

Alpha Literary Society; Hi^h School Club; 
French Circle; Freshman Swimming Team; Y. \Y. 
C. A.; Athletic Association. 



ANNIE MAE BROWN 

WIN* FALL 

High School 

Sec.-Treas. Student Government; Pres. Alpha 
Literary Society; Asst. Ed. Sciioolma'am ; Sec. 
Alpha Chi Chapter Kappa Delta Pi; House Chair- 
man Spottswood Hall ; Treas. Page Literary Soci- 
ety; High School Club; Euclid Club; Presidents 
Council ; Chairman Electoral Board; Biology Asst. 
L929-'30-'31 ; V. \V. C. A. Committee; Athletic 
Association; Honor Roll. 



S \K\1I ELLEN BOWERS 

GRAFTON, \V. VA. 

Elementary 

Sec'y Freshman Class; ./Eolian Club; Ass't Bus. 
M'g'r Athletic Council; Capt. Class Basketball 
Team ; Varsity Squad; Choral Club; (dee Club 
Librarian ; Treas. Page Literary Society ; Kampus 
Kitten Orchestra; Pres. Blue-Stone Orchestra; 
Presidents Council; Baseball Sport Leader; Junior 
Basketball Team ; Athletic Association ; Y. W. 
C. A.; Schoolma'am Staff. 





MARIE BURNETTE 

LEESVILLE 

High School 

President Lee Literary Society; Varsity Hockey 
Team, '30 ; Varsity Hockey Squad, '29 ; Varsity 
Basketball Squad,' '29-'30-'31; Senior Hockey 
Sport Leader; Class Basketball, Hockey and Base- 
ball Teams; High School Club; Debating Club; 
President Y. W. C. A. Choir; Athletic Associa- 
tion; Y. W. C. A.; Chora! Club. 



LAURA ELIZABETH CAMERON 

BRADENTON, FLA. 

High School 

House Chairman Jackson Hall, '29-'30; High 
School Club; Euclid Club; Alpha Literary So- 
ciety; Twenty-hour Scholarship. 






LUCILE MILDRED BYWATERS 

CULPEPER 

Home Economics 

Frances Sale Club; Athletic Association; Y. \V. 
C. A.; House Chairman Carter House, 192S. 





JANE ELIZABETH CAMPBELL 

OLD CHURCH 

High School 

Chairman Program Committee Alpha Chi Chap- 
ter of Kappa Delta Pi, 1930-'31 ; Secretary of 
V. W. C. A.; Intercollegiate Debater, 1930; Repre- 
sentative to Y. \Y. C. A. Conference at Mine 
Ridge, 1930; Breeze Staff; Chairman Bible Study 
Committee Y. W. C. A., 1929'30; French Circle, 
1929-'31; Sophomore Council, 192X-'29; Associate 
Editor SchoOLMa'am, 1927; Page Literary Society; 
Debating Club; Choral Club; High School Club; 
Athletic Association; Honor Roll. 



VUDREY LOUISE CASSELL 

ROANOKE 

High School 

Glee Club; Business Manager of Handbook 
1930; Assistant Business Manager of Brccse, 1931 
Page Literary Society; Student Council, 1930-'31 
-Eolian Club. 



ELIZABETH ARRENA CARROLL 

I 10 IN I Rl i 1 . \l 

Elementary 

Pinquet Tennis Club, 1924-'25; Choral Club, 
1924-'25; Athletic Association, 1924-'25; Y. W. C. 
A., 1924-'2S; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, '29; Student 
Council, '29; House Chairman Jackson Hall, '2S- 
'29; President Student Body, summer of 1930-'31. 





MARION M. CICERALE 

GUTTENBERG, N. J. 

High School 

Class Basketball; Class Hockey; Varsity Basket- 
ball; Varsity Hockey; Senior Sport Leader in 
Basketball; Blue-Stone Dance Orchestra. 



LOUISE LITTLETON COLEMAN 

GREENWOOD 

Elementary 

Cotillion Club; Sciioolma'am Art Committee; 
Art Club; House Chairman Cleveland Cottage; 
Y. W. C. A. 



MARY EVELYN CLICK 

MOUNT SIDNEY 

Home Economics 

Frances Sale Club; Alumnae 4-H Club Sec- 
retary, 1930-'31; Y. W. C. A.; Athletic Associa- 
tion; Day Students' Club, 1928-'29. 









FLORENE STEWART COLLINS 

S I AUNTON 

High School 

Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, 1929-'30-'31 ; House 
Chairman Johnston Hall; President Euclid Club; 
Treasurer Page Literary Society; Athletic Asso- 
ciation; Choral Club; Breeze Staff; Chairman of 
Electoral Board. 



GRACE DALGETY-KERR 

LYNCHBURG 

Elementary 

Chairman Program Committee Lanier Literary 
Society, '28; President Lanier Literary Society, 
1929-'30; Critic Lanier Literary Society, 1930, 
President Cotillion Club, 1930-'31 ; Y. W. C. A. 
Social Committee, 1929; Athletic Association; May 
Queen, 1931. 



NELLIE MORG \N COWAN 



Elementary 

President Y. W. C. A., '30-'31; Secretary Y. 
\Y. C. A., '29-'30; Business Manager and Vice- 
President /Eolian Club; Campus Relations Com- 
mittee; Vice-President and President Choral 
Club; Representative to Y. \Y. C. A. Conference 
at Blue Ridge; Nominating Convention; (dee 
Club; Lee Literary Society; Athletic Association; 
Sergeant-at-Arms Junior Class; Presidents Coun- 
cil, '28-'30-'31; Cotillion Club. 



X%A 




LOLA DAVIS 

HARRISONBURG 

High School 

Alpha Chi Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi; Art 
Club; Le Cercle Francais; Business Manager 
Day Students' Club ; Athletic Association. 



ALICE OVERTON ELAM 

GORDONSVILLE 

High School 

Secretary-Treasurer Alpha Chi Chapter of 
Kappa Delta Pi; Secretary Euclid Club, 1928; 
President Euclid Club, 1929-'30; Treasurer Page 
Literary Society, 1930; Chairman of Program 
Committee Y. W. C. A., 1930-'31; Representative 
to Y. W. C. A. Conference at Blue Ridge, 1930; 
High School Club; Athletic Association. 



ELIZABETH ELLEN DOWNEY 

EDINBURG 

Elementary 

1929-31; Choral Club, 192S-29; 



Glee Club 
yEolian Club. 








REBECCA ELLSWORTH EMORY 

NORFOLK 

Elementary 

Cotillion Club; Vice-President Page Literary 
Society; Reporter to Breeze, '30; Student Council 
Summer School; Athletic Association; Y. W. C. A. 



SADIE SYLVIA FINKELSTEIN 

WINCHESTER 

High School 

Kappa Delta Pi; Scribblers; Breeze Staff, 1929- 
"31; President of French Circle, 1928-'29; Pianist 
of Blue-Stone Dance Orchestra; Student Council, 
1927-'30; Y. W. C. A.; Choral Club, 1927-'28; 
High School Club, 1927-'28. 



MARY KATHRYN FIREBAH.H 

HARRISONBURG 

Home Economics 

Kappa Delta Pi; Day Students' Club; Y. 
C. A.; Athletic Association. 





HATTIE FLORENE GIBSON 

HAGAN 

Home Economics 

Lincoln Memorial University, Harrogate, Ten- 
nessee: Delta Tlieta Sigma; Virginia Club; Home 
Economics Club; Kitchen Cabinet Club; Varsity 
Basketball; V. W. C. A. H. T. C. : Athletic Asso- 
ciation; Class Basketball; Alpha Literary Society; 
Y. W. C. A.; Frances Sale Club; Class Baseball. 



ELIZABETH JEANETTE GORE 

CAMBRIDGE, MD. 

Home Economics 

Kappa Delta Pi; Lanier Literary Society; Sec- 
retary of Senior Class; Vice-President of Frances 
Sales Club, 1930'31 ; Y. W. C. A. Committee. 



VIRGINIA RUFFIN GILLIAM 

PRINCE GEORGE 

Home Economics 

Editor-in-Chief Schoolma'am, 1931; Kappa 
Delta Pi; Presidents Council; Scribblers; Lee 
Literary Society; Frances Sale Club; Treas. Soph. 
Class; Bus. M'g'r Schoolma'am, 1930; V. I. P. A.; 
Nominating Convention, '2S-'30-'31; Class Basket- 
ball Team; Varsity Hockey Squad; Class Hockey 
Team, '29-'30-'31; Athletic Ass'n; Y. W. C. A. 





SARAH EMILE GROSECLOSE 

WYTHEV1LLE 

Home Economics 

State Teachers College, Farmville, Va.: Campus 
League Committee, 1927-'28; De-Ho-Ec Club; V. 
W. C. A. ; Athletic Association; Cotillion Club. 
H. T. C. : Student Council Representative of 
Junior Class; Y. \Y. C. A. Social Service Com- 
mittee; Frances Sale Club; Chaperon of Fresh- 
man ( >roup, 1 930-'3 1 ; Alpha Literary Society ; 
Athletic Association. 



VIRGINIA CLYDE HARLIN 

HARRISONBURG 

Home Economics 

Glee Chili; .Eolian Club; Athletic Association; 
Alpha Literary Society. 



NATHALIE RANDOLPH HARDY 

PAMPLIN 



Home Econo 



mics 



Frances Sale Club, 1927-'31; V. VV. C. A.. 
I927-'31; Choral Club, 1928-"31; Y. W. C. A. 
Choir, iy2S-'30: Athletic Association, 1927-'31; 
Alpha Literary Society; Student Volunteer Group, 
1928-'31; Rcfl Cross; 4-H Club. 





ALMA DONALENE HARVEY 

SCHOOLEIELD 

High School 

Varsitv Tennis, 1929-'30, '30-'31; Sport Leader 
Class Tennis, 1929-'30, '30-'31; Class Basketball, 
1929-'30, '30-'31; Class Swimming, 1929-'30, 
'30-'31; Stratford Dramatic Club. 



NETTIE MAE HUMPHRIES 

RICHMOND 

Home Economics 

Athletic Association; Alpha Literary Society; 
Frances Sale Club; House Chairman Wellington 
Hall, 192S-'29; Y. W. C. A. 



MARY WILLIAM HOLTER 

FREDERICK, MD. 

Home Economics 

Senior Representative on Schoolma'am Staff; 
House Chairman of Alumnae Hall; Typist for the 
Breeze, 1929-'30, '30-'31; Choral Club, 1927-'31; 
Frances Sale Club; Y. W. C. A. Choir; 4-H Club, 
I927-'31; Y. W. C. A,; Freshman Hockey Team; 
Junior Hockey Team; Athletic Association, 1927- 
'31; Red Cross; Alpha Literary Society; Sopho- 
more Baseball Team; Typist for the School- 
ma'am, 1930. 





IDA DELPHINE HURST 

NORFOLK 

Elementary 

President Sophomore and Senior Classes; Presi- 
dent Summer Junior Class; Sec. Freshman Class; 
Kappa Delta Pi; Business Manager Glee Club; 
Vice-President Lee Literary Society; Cotillion 
Club; Treas. Choral Club; Freshman Hockey 
Team ; Sophomore Swimming Team ; Presidents 
Council ; Debating Club, Inter-Collegiate Debater, 
'29-'30, '30-'31; Annual Staff; Electoral Board; 
Athletic Ass'n; Y. W. C. A.; Nominating Conven- 
tion; May Court; Senior Class Play. 



MARY ELIZABETH JONES 



High School 

Alpha Literary Society; High School CI 
W. C. A.; Euclid Club Treasurer, 1930. 



JEANNETTE CUTTLE INGLE 

SOUTH BOSTON 

High School 

Kappa Delta Pi; Vice-President V. W. C. A., 
1930-'31; Treasurer Y. W. C. A., 1929-'30; Cotil- 
lion Club; Lanier Literary Society; French Circle; 
Class Swimming Team; Varsity Hockey Squad; 
Annual Staff; Athletic Council; Student Council; 
Representative to Y. W. C. A. Conference at Blue 
Ridge; Nominating Convention. 





Athletic Association 

Volunteer. 



ELIZABETH KAGEY 

MOUNT JACKSON 

High School 

W. C. A.; Student 



MABELLE INEZ KILLINGER 

RURAL RETREAT 
Home Economics 

Y. \V. C. A.; Athletic Association; Frances Sale 
Club; Alpha Literary Society; Choral Club. 



MAXINE KARNES 

SHENANDOAH 

High School 

Vice-President of Page Literary Society; High 
School Club; Y. W. C. A.; Athletic Association. 





NANCY CARTER I- XMI'.KRT 

BRIDGEWATER 

High School 

French Circle; Summer Breeze Staff, iy3U. 



MAYRE HOTINGER LOWMAN 

MILLBORO 

Elementary 

Alpha Literary Society; Choral Club; V. \V. 
C. A.; Athletic Association. 



SADIE MAE LONGE 

MIDDLETON 

High School 

Athletic Association; Y. W. C. A. 





MARY KATHRYN LOWMAN 

PULASKI 

High School 

Alpha Literary Society; High School Club; Ath- 
letic Association; Y. \V. C. A. 



FRANCES WALTHALL McGEE 

ROANOKE 

High School 

Stonewall Jackson College; Scribblers; Glee Club; 
Lee Literary Society; Athletic Association; Choral 
Club; Alpha Literary Society; Y. W. C. A. 



MARY LOU SUMMERS McFADDIN 

LEBANON 

Home Economics 

Alpha Literary Society; Choral Club; Frances 
Sale Club; Athletic Association; Y. W. C. A. 








HELEN SHELTON McNEELY 

DANVILLE 

High School 

President and Vice-President of Art Club; Strat- 
ford Dramatic Club; Society and Campus Editor 
of Breeze; Presidents Council ; Chairman of Pro- 
gram Committee of Euclid Club; Freshman Hockey 
Team; Choral Club, '28-'29; High School Club; V. 
\V C. A ; Athletic Association. 



FRANCES ANN MATTHEWS 

CAMBRIDGE, MH. 

II, one Economics 

Vice-President Alpha Chi Chapter of Kappa 
Delta Pi, *30-'31; President Frances Sale Club, '30- 
'31; Vice-President Frances Sale Club, '29-*30; Y. 
W. C. A. Cabinet, '31; Secretary Lanier Literary 
Society, '31; Treasurer Junior Class, '30; Presi- 
dents Council; V. W. C. A. Committee. '_"' MOMl, 



RUTH MALOY 

McDowell 

High School 

Alpha Literary Society ; V. \V. C. A. ; High 
School Club; House Chairman nf Spottswood, 
Summer 1 M30. 








SHIRLEY ELIZABETH MILLER 



High School 

President Student Government; President JEolian 
Music Club; Kappa Delta Pi; Composer Senior 
Class Song; Chairman Music Committee Y. W. 
C. A.; Lee Literary Society; Treasurer French 
Circle; Choral Club; Chairman Nominating Con- 
vention ; Chairman Campus Relations Committee ; 
Secretary Presidents Council; Junior Class Basket- 
ball Team; Representative to Southern Inter-Col- 
legiate Association of Student Government, Greens- 
boro, N. C. ; Director Choral Club; Athletic Asso- 
ciation; President of Presidents Council. 



Frances Sale Club; Y 
sociation. 



LOIS MITCHELL 

BOXWOOD 

Home Economics 

W. C. A.; Athletic As- 



REBECCA MARIA MINOR 

LIGHTFOOT 
HOME ECONOMICS 



Frances Sale Club; 
Society; Y. W. C. A. 



4-H Club; Alpha Literary 
Athletic Association. 





M \KTII \ KATHERINl 

TIMBEItYM.1.1 

Elementary 



MOOKK 



DAISY OLA NASH 

BLACKSTONE 

High School 

Secretary to Dean of Women, 1929-'30; Blue- 
Stone Orchestra, 1929-'30; V. W. C. A. j Alpha 
Literary Society; Hi^h School Club. 



MRS. NORA HEATWOLE MOYERS 

DAV TON 

Elementary 



i 


i 


e&-dl 




MARY ANN NICHOLS 

PURCELLVILLE 

High School 

Vice-President of Euclid Club, 1929-'30; Secre- 
tary of Euclid Club, 1930; Athletic Association. 



IRMA ACREE ORANGE 

EXMORE 

Home Economics 

Lanier Literary Society; Cotillion Club; Frances 
Sale Club; Blue-Stone Orchestra; Y. \V. C. A.; 
Athletic Association. 



JANE ELIZABETH OAKES 



High School 

Kappa Delta Pi; Business Manager Breeze, 1930- 
'31; Assistant Business Manager Breeze, 1929-'30; 
Glee Club; Treasurer Junior Class; Class Hockev 
Teams, '27-'28-'29-'30; Varsity Hockey Squad, '28; 
Page Literary Society— President, '2S; Critic, '29- 
'30-'31; Sergeant-at-Arms, '30; Presidents Council; 
Debating Club; High School Club; Choral Club; 
Y. W. C. A.; Breeze Reporter; Nominating Con- 
vention; Euclid Club; Athletic Association. 





HARRIET ATKINSON PEARSON 

WINCHESTER 

Ho nir Economics 

(ilcc Club; Vice-President, 1929-'30; Business 
Manager, 1930-'31; President Cotillion Club, 1928- 

'20; President Alpha Literary Society, 1930-'31; 
Critic Lanier Literary Society; May Queen, 1930; 
Y. W. C. A. Committee Member, 10.1(1-31; Presi- 
dents Council; Choral Club. 



VERNA GAYF. PHILLIPP1 

RURAL RETREAT 

Home Economics 

Frances Sale Club; Alumnae 4-H Club Treasurer, 
1930-'31; Alpha Literary Society; Y. \Y. C. A.; 
Athletic Association. 



ELSPETH PEYTON 

ETHEL 

Elementary 

Tea-Room Assistant; Lee Literary Society; Class 
Basketball, '29-'30-'31; Baseball, '28-'29-'30-'31; 
Swimming, '30-'31; Hockey, '28-'29-'30-'31; Y. W. 
C. A.; Athletic Association. 





ELIZABETH PLANK 

F1NCASTLE 

High School 

Secretary Debating Club, 1930-'31; House Chair- 
man Sheldon Hall, 1930-'31; Breeze Staff, 1930-'31; 
Group Chairman of Program Committee Alpha Lit- 
erary Society, 1927; Y. W. C. A.; Athletic Associ- 
ation; Page Literary Society. 



SARA FRANCES RALSTON 

STAUNTON 

Elementary 

President Art Club; Annual Art Committee, 1929- 
1930-'31; Glee Club; Alpha Literary Society; Y. 
W. C. A.; Athletic Association; Breeze Staff; Stu- 
dent Council. 



Y. W. C. A 

dents Club. 



ELISE QUISENBERRY 

ROANOKE 

Home Economic? 

Athletic Association; Day Stu- 








DOROTHY HELEN RODES 

GREENWOOD 

Home Economics 

Secretary Junior Class; S( hoolma'am Art Com- 
mittee, 1930; Art Club; Vice-President and Chair- 
man Program Committee Lanier Literary Society; 
Sergeant-at-Arms and Secretary Frances Sale Club; 
President Y. \Y. C. A., Summer, 1929; Y. \Y. 
C. A. Cabinet, 1929-'30-'31 ; Y. VV. C. A. Choir; 
Freshman Hockey Squad. 



MARY ELLEN SANFORD 

TUCKER HILL 

Home Economics 

Frances Sale Club; Y. W. C. A.; Athletic As- 
sociation; Alpha Literary Society. 



VIRGINIA GERTRUDE RUST 

FLINT HILL 

High School 
Breeze Staff I930'31; Student Council 1930-'31. 





BLANCHE SCHULER 

BROADWAY 

High School 

Reporter Summer Breeze, 1928; Reporter Breeze, 
1930-'31; High School Club; Athletic Association. 



FRANCES DIDCOCT SNYDER 



High School 

Editor-in-Chief Breeze, 1930-'31; Business Man- 
ager Breeze, 1929-'30; Breeze Staff, 1927-'28-'29; 
Reporter Alpha Chi Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi; 
Charter Member and Chief Scribe of Scribblers; 
Debating Club, Inter-Collegiate Debating Team; 
Page Literary Society; French Circle; Y. \Y. 
C. A. Committee Member; Athletic Association; 
Editor of Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, and Se- 
nior Class Day Breeze; Presidents Council, 1929- 
'30-'31; Member Executive Committee V. I. P. A. 



WELLFORD SMITH 

CHARLES TOWN, W. VA. 

High School 

Athletic Council; Y. W. C. A.; Class Hockey, 
Basketball, Baseball, and Swimming, 1930-'31. 





M \KTHA GWYN SOMERS 

BURKEVILLE 

llnmc Economics 

Chairman of Program Committee of Alpha Lit- 
erary Society, 1927-'2S; Frances Sale Club; Choral 
Club; Y. W. C. A. Choir; Athletic Association; 
Y. W. C. A. 



FLORENCE ELIZABETH 

STEPHENSON 

NORFOLK 

llomc Economics 

Assistant Business Manager of Schoolma'am, 
l n 29-'30; Secretary of Lee Literary Society, 1931; 
Y, \Y. C. A.; Athletic Association. 



VIRGINIA JORDAN STARK 



Elementary 

President Freshman Class; Vice-President Soph- 
omore Class; Assistant Business Manager Junior 
Class; Business Manager Senior Class; Cotillion 
Club; President Lanier Literary Society; Secretary 
Student ( iovernment ; Presidents Conned ; Y. W. 
C. A. Cabinet ; Kappa 1 >elta Pi ; Director Clas- 
Plays; Nominating Convention; Varsity Hockey 
Team; Class Baseball ; Class Hockey ; Class Tennis; 
Class Swimming; May Court; Athletic Association. 






YERICE MAE STEPHENSON 



High School 

1927-'29 at Westhampton College: Freshman 
Representative to the Y. W. C. A. Council; Class 
Hockey Team, 1928-'29; Class Basketball Team, 
192S-'29 ;Vesper Choir, 1929. 

At H. T. C: Choral Club; Secretary Glee 
Club, 193"-'31; Treasurer Lee Literary Society, 
1930-'31; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, and Chairman of 
Program Committee; President Y. \V. C. A., Sum- 
mer, 1930. 



KATHLEEN TEMPLE 

BRODNAX 



High School 



Alpha Literary Society; 
French Circle; Y. W. C. A. 



High School Club; 
Athletic Association. 



ELLA ANTRIM STOVER 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Elementary 

Debating Club; Athletic Asociation; French Circle. 






BEULAH VIRGINIA THOMAS 

PORTSMOUTH 

High School 

Vice-Presideni Student Government; Kappa Delta 
Pi; Stratford Dramatic Club; Vice-Pres. and Sec. 
Cotillion Club; College Cheer Leader; Senior Class 
Cheer Leader: Pres. Page Literary Society; Fresh- 
man Hockey Team; Debatins Club; Representative 
to Southern Inter-Collegiate Association of Student 
( lovernment. 



VIVIEN TURNER 

ELIZABETH CITY, X. C. 

High Sellout 

House Chairman of Ashby Hall; Chairman of 
Program Committee of High School Club; Secre- 
tary of French Circle; Athletic Association; Y. \Y. 
C. A. 



ANNE RADFORD TROTT 

FORT DEFIANCE 

Elementary 

President Alpha Chi Chapter Kappa Delta Pi; 
Editor-in-Chief 1930 Schoolma'am; Charter Mem- 
ber and Chief Scribe Scribblers; Stratford Dra- 
matic Club; Debating Club; Winner Inter-Collegi- 
ate Oration; Sec. Campus Relations Committee; 
Class Swimming; Class Historian; Junior and 
Senior Class Plays; Lee Literary Society; Class 
Breeze four years; Presidents' Council; Nominat- 
ing Convention; V. I. P. A.; Y. W. C. A.; Ath- 
letic Association. 





LILLIAN WALKER 

CHATHAM 

High School 

High School Club, 1927-'28; Class Baseball, Bas- 
ketball, and Hockey Teams, 1928-'29-'30-'31 ; Ath- 
letic Association; Y. W. C. A.; Group Leader 
Alpha Literary Society, 192S-'29. 



MARY GRACE WATT 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Home Economics 

Business Manager Freshman Class; Business 
Manager Breeze, 192S-'29; Business Manager Ath- 
letic Association, 1929-'30; President Athletic As- 
sociation, 1930-'31; Lee Literary Society; Cotillion 
Club; Student Council; Annual Staff, 1929; Class 
Hockey, 1928-'29-'30-'31 ; Varsity Hockey, 1929-'30- 
■31; Captain Varsity Hockey, 1931; Kappa Delta 
Pi; May Court; Presidents Council; Nominating 
Convention, 1929-'30-'31. 



ELEANOR VIRGINIA WALL 

ELACKSBURC 
High School 
H. T. C. : Class Basketball; Alpha Literary So- 
ciety; High School Club; Athletic Association. 

Virginia Intermont: Treasurer Kappa Phi; 
Treasurer Harrisonian Literary Society; Virginia 
Club; Tennis Club; Basketball Squad; Life Saving 
Corps; Y. W. C. A.; Athletic Association. 
Radford: Pocahontas Literary Society. 





ETHEL WILLARD 

RURAL KM Rl A I 

Elementary 

Maryville College: Bainonian Literary Societj ; 
Editor Virginia Club; Basketball Squad. 
Harrisonburg: V. \Y. C. A. 



LOUISE WINE 

WAYNESBORO 

High School 

Chairman Program Committee French Circle; 
Breeze Staff: High School Club; V. W. C. A.; 

Athletic Association; Alpha Literary Society. 



EVELYN \l> VMS WILSON 

RICH MOND 

High School 

Yars,iv Hockey Team-. [928-'29-'30; Varsity 
Swimming Teams. l928-'29, 1930-'31; Captain Var- 
sity Swimming, 1931; Class Hockey Teams, 1927- 
J.s r 'jq.'30; Class Swimming Teams, 1928-'29'30- 
'31; Class Basketball, 1929; Class Baseball, 1929; 
Athletic Council, \'HX. 1931; Varsity Basketball 
Squad, 1929; Lee Literary Society; Sergeant-at- 
Arms Lee Literary Society; Cotillion Club; Vice- 
President Junior Class; Fire Chief; Swimming 
Sport Leader, 1931; Student Council. 





LOIS WATSON WINSTON 



ELEANOR ASHBY WRENN 



HAMPDEN-SIDNEY COLLEGE 

Home Economics 

Kappa Delta Pi; President Junior Class; Vice- 
President Senior Class; Annual Art Committee, 
1930-'3l; Business Manager Art Club; Sergeant-at- 
Arms Frances Sale Club: Chairman Program Com- 
mittee Page Literary Society; House Chairman 
Alumnae Hall; Assistant House Chairman Johnston 
Hall; Presidents Council; Y. \V. C. A. Cabinet; 
Baseball Team; Athletic Association. 



ED1NBURG 

High School 

Kappa Delta Pi; Debating Club, 1929-'30-'31 ; 
Business Manager and Treasurer of Debating 
Club, 1930-'31; French Circle: President, 1930- '31; 
Secretary, 1929-'30; Chairman of Program Com- 
mittee, 1928-'29; Y. W. C. A. Committee; Assist- 
ant Editor Breeze, Summer, 1930; Breeze Staff, 
1930-'31; Member Student Volunteer Movement; 
Chairman Program Committee, 1930'31 ; Athletic 
Association. 




Senior Class Hislory 

The Four-Year Pageant Here Enacted by the Class of 1931 

"THE PLAY'S THE THING" 

WAS after the theater. A group of men and women in eve- 
ning dress were talking together. From their midst came frag- 
ments of lively conversation — ". . . there, in the second act. 
when she made that dramatic hit. . . ."--"Hut I disagree; 
the climax came in the third act." — "Have you forgotten the 
garden scene ?"- -"Well, how about his first entrance?" 
standing a little away and holding himself so as to appear apart, spoke 
suddenly — without abruptness, hut with a tone and meaning that was finality — 
'Why bother to disagree? The play on the whole was superb." 




The scenery for our play has been the majestic, ever-changing panorama of 
earth, mountain, and sky, shifted — not with each act but with the seasons — im- 
perceptibly from one beauty to another. 

In a sense the whole world has been our theater, and the whole world our 
audience. A better audience no other troupe has ever had — an audience that 
sacrificed for us, wept and laughed for us, encouraged us, and expected the high- 
est from us. 

There has been no single author of this play, yet the greatest Author has 
guarded and guided us. The influence and aid of directors and stage managers 
has been immeasurable. 

We have had the music of human voices, of birds, of instruments, of all 
living things; we have had the greatest stage lights and the least: sun, moon, stars, 
and — green electric bulbs. 

Above all, it was truly our own play — ours to mold, to make into a comedy 
or a tragedy. We have indeed touched it with both elements; yet who dares to 
classify it, remembering both the jollity and the pathos? 

Our first act was one of adjustment — halting, stumbling, sometimes losing 
our lines, sometimes failing from stage fright, but finally achieving adjustment. 



Stunt night, new girl- 



ddinj 



drl receptions, basketball, holidays, 



Spanish dancers. Sketch Book, baby caps, commencement, and our first seniority 
service. — What glorious scenes these were! 

Sophomores — wise fools! Just a little bit surer of ourselves, more class 
spirit, deeper friendship, keener appreciation of our own part in the tremendous 
pageant of living. Cock-sure enough to toss our heads and say, "What Does It 
Matter?" we yet could thrill with the heritage of traditions and ideals left by 
those who had passed off this stage in June — left for us to carry high. 

Oh, the jolly, rollicking Junior days! We had a sister class; we turned 
mental somersaults; we tried to acquire poise; we had responsibilities given to 
us, and we worked to live up to the trust : we had new privileges, new ideals, new 
visions — and we came up on top, wiser, somewhat bruised, but "Smilin' Through" ! 



Because the fourth act has been the last act, and because every day has 
brought more clearly to us that realization and its unmistakable meaning, we have 
fought any semblance of grief or fear. We have made fun of ourselves and of 
everyone else. We have lived each day to its fullest, reveling and lingering in the 
enjoyment of every opportunity. 

We have mocked melodrama in such a way as to terrify an audience "In 
the Dead of Night"; we have welcomed back alumnae; we have seen a new build- 
ing grow and trees spring up ; we have danced under black and white ; we have 
worn caps and gowns ; we have filled out application blanks ; we have graduated. 

Are we very different from those girls who came in September four years 
ago — seeking? Have we found our treasure? Will we take it to others? How 
will we complete our play? 

For every r.ctor, there is some dearest memory — an exciting game, the smile 
of a friend, an adventure in reading, a walk under stars or in the rain, a dance, a 
song, a laugh, a sense of peace, an understanding — but for all the play has been 
superb ! 



Henta< 



A jingle of spurs, 

A crimson flash, 

A laughing jest in the quiet air, 

A glitter of steel in the sun's bright rav, 

And high adventure beyond compare. 

Gaily, with heads erect, they came — 

With but themselves 

And their faith in God — 

Through rushing streams 

Where shadows fell ; 

Up over rocks that were bare and hard 

They faltered not, but onward pressed 

Across blue hills to a blue sky's hem. 

They passed : the road is ours. God grant 

That we be not unfit to follow them. 



Prophecy of the Class of '3 1 




T WAS 1951, and airplanes had become as prevalent and cheap 
as second-hand Fords. After teaching constantly for twenty 
years, I had saved enough money to make the first payment on .1 
little machine called the Flighty Four and set out to spend my 
vacation seeing the world from the air. 1 took along a powerful 
telescope in order to be able to fly high and -.till not miss any- 
thing. The thing that interested me especially was the way in which the mem- 
bers of the Class of "31 at H. T. C. had scattered over the globe, and the remark- 
able variety of their occupations. 

After I left Kalamazoo, where for long years I had been instructing the 
rising generation in the wax's of the wicked world, the first thing to come to m\ 
attention was a catalog lying on the seat beside me. On the cover was: "Helen 
Marbut School of Physical Education — faculty Includes Marion Cicerale, Well- 
ford Smith, and Evelyn Wilson." So our "Big Sister," Miss Marbut. is nationally 
known: and her faculty, judging from the samples, is excellent. 

There was a radio in my plane that 1 must try as we went along. I turned it 
on: "Mr. John Mcllwraith has just won the golf championship of the United 
States," a speaker was saying. The "Big Brother" of the class of '31 has indeed 
amassed, through the years, countless cups as golf trophies. Another station 
conies on: "The great Kathleen Pickett dances before a gathering of European 
Royalty and brings down the house." What! The same Kathleen, the mascot of 
our class? Without a doubt, the same! 

Now to observe the land below. There is a huge sign reading: "This week 
an exhibition of paintings by the famous artist, Edith Andes. Includes poses of 
her models, Elizabeth Kagey and Henrietta Blanton." 

By a winding river is a dairy farm, where, seated, surrounded by milk cans 
and supremely happy, is Jingle. The milkmaids. Fan ami Rosa Pell, are always 
busy bringing up more supplies of lacteal fluid. 

A race-track adjoins this, and crowds are waiting to see the race. The horses 
come out, and the sight of the jockeys gives me rather a jolt. There, mounted 
upon the noble steeds, are Gwyn Somers, Alice Elam, Mary Holler, and Sadie 
Longe. 

Farther along is a factory, on the top of which is this advertisement : 
"Popless Chewing Gum — Try it — Your friends will never know you chew!" In- 
vented and manufactured by Sue Ayres and demonstrated by Ruth Beeson, 
Hattie Gibson, and Inez Killinger. 

To the south are spreading green fields, in which grows the ( Idorless < )nion, 
a boon to man, perfected by I. aura Cameron and Rebecca Beverage, renowned 
scientists. 

A track meet is in progress at a nearby city. Sara Ellen Bowers and Eliza- 
beth Plank have tied for championship. They attribute their success to the good 
influence of their thrice-daily sprints to the dining room at II. T. C. 



In the central square of the city an immense crowd is gathered around 
Lillian Walker, who speaks from a soap box in favor of Ken Bird as governor and 
Nathalie Hardy and Ella Stover for Congress. 

Now we are in Virginia. There is V. M. I., but much changed. Alas, it 
has gone co-ed, and a bronze statue of Virginia Thomas, the first cadetette, is 
prominent. Some of the other members of that first class were Jeanette Gore, 
Kathrvn Firebaugh, and Grace Blalock. 

Down on the coast of Florida in the warm sun some figures are lying. Though 
they look it. the}' are not dead. On closer inspection the features of Mary Watt, 
Louise Coleman, and Marie Burnette appear. They spend their time basking 
in the sun and sleeping in a Rip Van Winkle-ish way. 

Now another plane flies near. It is piloted by Lillie Frances Blankenbaker, 
and Helen McNeely is ensconced in the passenger's seat. They fly toward a large 
gray cloud, and Helen, carrying a bucket and brush, climbs out on the wing. 
Great blobs of gold streak the air as she paints the cloud with sunshine. 

Over in Kansas a large threshing rig is in action. The boss, Mae Brown, 
must have something against the grain, from the way she insists that her assistants, 
Martha Moore and Florence Stephenson, shall have it properly threshed. 

In Wyoming there is a ranch filled with horses of the bucking bronco variety. 
From the ground, where one has just pitched her, Lena Bones is being assisted to 
arise by Sara Frances Ralston, who has just finished breaking the wildest bronco 
by merely sitting on it. 

Two small pack burros are trudging across the sand, followed by Dorothy 
Borum and Rowena Crush — prospecting the hills for the elusive gold. 

Down near the Mexican border, where they live in huge Spanish-style houses, 
Lucile Bywaters and Emile Groseclose are being serenaded by two gay caballeros 
with tinkling guitars. 

A band of wandering musicians that travel all through the South pass below. 
Sadie Finkelstein, carrying a grand piano, is in the lead, and behind her come 
Kathleen Temple, who plays on a comb, Mary Ellen Sanford, with a xylophone, 
and Gaye Phillippi, carrying her bagpipe. This orchestra is enthusiastically re- 
ceived by audiences all over the country. 

Now we go over Hollywood, and it is gratifying to see who of the class of 
'31 are in the movies. Vivien Turner, Verice Stephenson, Elise Ouisenberry, and 
Elspeth Peyton have all made great names for themselves and live in great castle- 
like houses in Berkeley Hills. 

In the Yucatan section of Mexico, Mary Ann Nichols and Mayre Lowman, 
renowned archeologists. are digging up the remains of long-dead tribes and bring- 
ing to light all manner of unusual things. 

Out in the Pacific floats an immense glittering yacht. The captain, Maria 
Minor, is discussing with the owner, Virginia Case, the course to be followed. A 
sailor, Mary Lou McFaddin, is climbing up to the crow's nest to look over the 
ocean. 

Upon arriving at the Hawaiian Islands, I was rather surprised to find that 
Jane Campbell, who had gone there to teach, had gone native and was queen of the 



islands, wearing a grass skirt and looking very much changed. The ladies in her 
court were Sue Glover, Elizabeth Downey, Audrey Cassell, and Rebecca Emory. 
It was a wise choice — the costumes were so becoming. 

In the Philippines, Evelyn Click is Governor and Xettie Humphries com- 
mander of the army. Politics are duck soup for them. 

There was a lovely little Chinese house near Shanghai, where Frances Snyder, 
Daisy Nash, and Blanche Schuler sat smoking opium and dreaming of "them good 
old days at H. T. C." In the- interior of the country is a mission school in which 
Grace Kerr. Nancy Carter Lambert, and Dorothy Rodes are enlightening the 
heathen. They love the work. 

Virginia Stark married the Sultan of Turkey and is the power behind the 
throne. Her poor hen-pecked husband is frightened at his own voice. Tulia 
Becton and Irma Orange are trying frantically to raise the status of the Turkish 
women. Alas, their efforts are in vain! 

Elizabeth Jones and Ruth Maloy are the most enthusiastic Soviets in Russia. 
They always did like red. Elizabeth Oakes and Airs. Nora Moyers rashly defied 
their power and are to be shot at sunrise. 

It was hard to pass over Italy because Harriet Pearson, who lived there, was 
singing in the garden by her villa. We flew around several times listening to her. 

It was necessary to circle Mt. Blanc twice in order to enjov fully the spec- 
tacle of Eleanor Wall and Lois Mitchell bravely trying to climb to the top. Their 
long-suffering guide, Florene Collins, was putting up a good fight to get them there. 

On the beach at Deauville sat Eleanor Wrenn twittering French glibly to a 
group of friends. Frances McGhee with her husband, the Count of Monte Cristo. 
sat at a nearby table; while gracefully riding a surfboard over the waves was no 
other than Elizabeth Carroll. 

Lola Davis and Virginia Harlin have rented the Rock of Gibraltar and are 
there seeking solitude from the hordes of people who hunt them out — Lola for 
her beauty, and Virginia for her sweet voice. 

As we went over Buckingham Palace, we were greeted by the sight of Vir- 
ginia Gilliam and Delphine Hurst coming from being presented at Court. It was 
hard to recognize them, all dressed up like plush horses. Virginia is a poet uni- 
versally known, and Delphine is representing the United States in a national beauty 
contest. 

After crossing the Atlantic we welcomed the sight of the sky-line of New 
York. Brightly lighted words flashed out before us as we arrived. "Anne Trott — 
here this week only, seats ten dollars and up." Anne has put Ruth Draper in the 
shade long ago. Near by another form of entertainment is offered. Miller's 
Theatre — Shirley writes all her own words and music, and Nellie Cowan is her 
leading lady. Frances Matthews, Man' Lowman, and Maxine Karnes are impres- 
sionistic dancers also giving performances in this theatre. 

Now an artistic and very imposing sign attracts my attention: "Donalene 
Harvev, Social Adviser — Anything from Birthday Parties to Funerals." Donalene 
has put her versatility to good use. 

A house of gigantic size on the edge of town is the residence of Lois Winston, 
leader of New York's "Four Hundred," all of whom, at this very moment she is 
entertaining at a garden party. 

Near Newport are the huge mansions of Mrs. McRockerbilt, formerly Ethel 
Willard, and one of her neighbors, Gertrude Rust, a landscape painter of unusual 
ability. Each dav Gertrude turns from her door droves of aspiring suitors. 

Having seen the success and happiness of every member of the Class of '31 at 
H. T. C. I returned to my school, the only one who had really taught school for 
twenty years. 

—Louise Wine 










xf>jfe>ih 













STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE. HARRISONBURG, VIRGINIA 


The Graduating Classes 






Present 






DOLLY MADISON 




by 






CHARLES F. NIRDLINGER 






Monday Evening, Jink 8, 1931 






Woodrow Wilson Hall 






PERSONS OF THE PLAY 






Sir Anthony Merry 


. . Elizabeth Plank 




Jennings 


Ken Bird 




Bohlen Pinckney 


Mae Brown 




Sally McKean 


. . . Helen McNeely 


Dolly Todd 


. . Virgin ia Thomas 


Clotilde 


Mary Watt 


Sophia Sparkle 


Betty Bush 


Mrs. Sparkle 


. . .Maxi.ne Ka r n es 




Aaron Burr 


Anne Trott 


I ames Madison S 


akaii Ellen Bowers 
. . .Delphine Hurst 


The Honorable Ena Ferrar 


I ady Merry 


. . 1 Jonalene 1 Iarvey 




Don Carlos Martinez 


. . Jeannette Ingle 


Louis Andre Pinchon 


.... Dorothy Needy 








Mynheer Van Berckel 


I . Y N DE N Mc P H ERSO N 


\ rou Van Berckel 


. . . .Virginia Stark 




LADIES IX WAITING 






Virginia Gilliam France 


s Snyder 




1 ka n ette Gore Fra n ce 


-> Matthews 




Elizabeth Downey Lois W 


NSTON 




Act I — The home of Dolly Todd 






Act II — The same, three days later 

a ^-n ill c i ti„, ,i,-„„.;.„, ,■„„.,, 


,,t" Tl,„„„.. T^fl-'u,.,-..., 





Scent- 2. The library of James Madison 



Senior Plays of Former Years 

Since the first years of the college it has always been customary 
for the graduating class to present a play during commencement week. 
The following list shows the year in which each play was given, and 
its author's name. Over three hundred girls have gained dramatic 
experience in these productions. 



DATE PLAY PLAYWRIGHT 

1911 — Esmeralda Frances Hodgson Burnett 

1912 — The Princess Tennyson 

1913 — The Gentle Shepherd Allan Ramsay 

1914 — The Rose of Plymouth Town 

Beulah Marie Dix and E. G. Sutherland 

1915 — The Russian Honeymoon Eugene Scribe 

1916 — The Winter's Tale Shakespeare 

1917 — The Lady of Lyons Bulwer-Lytton 

1918 — The Adventure of Lady Ursula Anthony Hope 

1919 — The Art of Being Bored Edouard Pailleron 

1920 — The Lost Pleiad Jane Dransfield 

1921 — Sherwood Alfred Noyes 

1922 — Pomander Walk Louis N. Parker 

1923 — The Lamp and the Bell Edna St. Vincent Millay 

1924 — A Midsummer Night's Dream Shakespeare 

1925 — The Piper Josephine Preston Peabody 

1926 — The Good-Natured Man Oliver Goldsmith 

1927 — Quality Street Sir James M. Barrie 

1928 — Prunella ( not produced) 

Laurence Housman and Granville Barker 

1929 — The Learned Ladies Moliere 

1930 — The Rivals Sheridan 



Junior Class 





Mr. C. T. Lor. ax 
Honorary Member 



Dr. Rachel Weems 
Big Sister 



MOTTO 

'Honor lies at labor's gate. 



COLORS 

Yellow ami White 




FLOWER 
Daisy 



Joe Li ii, ax. Mascot 




WARREN 
VICE-PRESIDENT 



JUNIOR 
OFFICERS 



ULLRICH 

SECRETARY 





MARKHAM 
BUS IN ESS MANAGER 



READE 

TREASU RER 



HYDE 

SERGEANT-AT-ARMS 



JUNIOR 



CLAS S 




COPENHAVER CORNELL 



CLASS 




G-LICK 



Ti 



JUNIOR 




JOHNSTON 



JUNIOR 




MOTLEY NEWMAN 



JUNIOR 



CLASS 




i 



PENNINGTON 








yfc 



READE 




ROLSTON 




SANDERS 



SHANK SHELTON 



JUNIOR 





CLASS 



E SMITH 



H.SMITH 







STRA1LMAN 




WINE ZIMMERMAN 







Junior Jumble 



Elevators in Particular 




X ELEVATOR? What significance could that cage-like affair 
have? When the sixth floor of a department store is one's des- 
tination after a tiresome afternoon of shopping, an elevator is a 
gift of the gods. When Dr. Pullem is waiting above to extract 
a tooth, and one is a-quiver with dread and excitement, its final 
jerk is almost a death-blow from the Satanic hand. At least, no 
further significance had impressed me until my first experience on a self-operating 
lift. Heretofore, there had been the usual "boy" with his caution, "Watch your 
step, please." Hence, a ride on an elevator in which the passenger and operator 
were one had not been included in my experience until my junior year in college. 
It all came about the evening of the annual banquet in honor of the diningr 
room girls. I was among other students assigned to serve. My first task was to 
go down to the senior dining room and bring twenty-seven dinner plates up to the 
kitchen. Being thus instructed, I stood looking blankly about for a stairway lead- 
ing down to my destination. A comrade came up and reminded me that a perfectly 
good elevator was at my disposal if I chose to find it and step in. I lost no time in 
finding it and stepping in. I awaited the arrival of one who would "carry" me 
down. I waited, and waited, but no such person appeared. Was there such a one ? 
Must I walk? Just then my eyes took in a row of little black buttons. Ah, so 
my opportunity had come ! Well, I would certainly lose no time in starting. I 
closed myself in and again sought the buttons. Yes, there they were, four of 
them — just four more than I knew how to manipulate. I must choose. And there 
my trouble began. Hoping Number One would be the correct button, I pressed 
firmly down upon it. 

No sooner had I touched it than I felt myself flying downward at full speed 
— past the dining room and headed straight for the laundry — and there was noth- 
ing I could do. A push upon another such button would probably send me 
through the roof ! They were all meaningless to me. Just as suddenly as I had 
started, I stopped ! The sudden halt brought me to my senses, and I was only too 
glad to step from my cage of despair. To think that twenty-seven dinner plates 
had caused all that agony ! Well, I must find them, anyway. 

With loaded arms, I again mounted the machine — but too soon realized my 
previous predicament, and was glad enough to back off. Seeing a nearby door, 
1 headed that way. 

Yes, there were the steps leading to the kitchen. I planted my foot firmly 
on the first step and began my upward climb. Now, at least, my fate was not 
dependent upon those four little black buttons which might have led to my de- 
struction — and even to the destruction of twenty-seven perfectly good dinner 
plates. 

— Katye Wray Brown 



Sophomore Class 




Dr. H. G. Pickf.tt 
Honorary Member 




Miss Miriam Faries 
Big Sister 



MOTTO 
"We ought, we can, and ?<.v will." 



COLORS 
Green and White 




FLOWER 

Shamrock 



u. rv Gibbons, Mascot 










TUDOR 

VIC E - PRESIDENT 



SOPHOMORE ellison 



OFFICERS 



S E CRET ARY 




BARD 

BUS I NESS MANAGER 




ZEHMER' 

SER&EANT-AT-ARMS 



FRIDINGER 

TREASURER 




SIDNEY McNEILL aldhizer 

BROADWAY 

Y. \Y. C. A.; V. W. C. A. Choir; Athletic Association 
Alpha Literary Society ; Day Students* Club; Choral 
Club; Fire Monitor in Spots wood. 

"Steady is she in mind, loyalty, friendship and tem- 
perament." 



ALICE AGXES ASHBY 

REMINGTON 

Athletic Association. 



"Quietly she worked away, 
Faithful to each duty." 



FRIEDA KEFFER BAILY 

NOTTOWAY 

Choral Club; Y. VV. C. A.; Athletic Association; Alpha 
.iterary Society. 

"tier ways are ways of pleasantness/* 



CATHERINE HANBURY HARD 

NORFOLK 

Lanier Literary Society; Stratford Dramatic Club; 
Blue Stone Cotillion Club; Schoolma'am Staff, 1930; 
Assistant Business Manager Schoolma'am, 1931 ; Busi- 
ness Manager Sophomore Class; Y. W. C. A. ; Athletic 
Association. 

"Sophisticated is she — seasoned with the spice of pep, 
good humor and readiness." 



ELIZABETH SUSAN BILLER 

ROCKINGHAM 
'Charm strikes tlu- sight; merit, the soul." 



NANNIE FRANCES BLACKWELL 

PINE HALL, NORTH CAROLINA 
'Tis a friendly person who has plenty of friends.' 



GLADDA MARIE BLOSE 

PENN LAIRD 
"Silence is more musical than any song." 



MARY ELIZABETH BOGGS 

GLENVIIXE, WEST VIRGINIA 

Y. \Y. (\ A. ; Athletic Association ; Lee Literary So- 
ciety. 

"A sunny temper forms the silver lining for even life's 
blackest cloud." 



MARY PAGE BONOURANT 



Y. \V. C. A. 

Society. 



NORFOLK 

Athletic Association ; Alpha Literary 

' ' Two sm iling eyes, 

Teeth of pearl, 
A rippling laugh, 

An adorable girl." 



ADELE VICTORIA BOOKER 

LEVEL RUN 
Y. \V. C. A.; Athletic Association. 
"Her heart as far from fraud as heaven from earth.' 



BERNTCE BOYYDEN 

RED HILL 

Y. W. C. A.; Freshman Hockey Team; Freshman Base- 
ball Team; Sophomore Hockey Team; Special Hockey 
Squad; Nominating Convention; Assistant Business Man- 
ager Breeze; Athletic Association ; Alpha Literary So- 
ciety; Business Maanger High School Club. 

"Here's the girl with the heart, the smile, the joiliness 
that makes the bubble of life worthwhile." 



MARGARET ANN BOYKIX 

SOUTH NORFOLK 

Athletic Association; Alpha Literary Society; Y. \V. 
C. A.; High School Club. 

"True friends appear less moved than counterfeit." 





MARIAN BRADHAM 

MANNINII, SOUTH CAROLINA 

V. VV. C. A.; Athletic Association; Alpha Literary So- 
ciety; Frances Sale Club; Chairman-of-t he- House of the 
Choral Club; Debating Club; Sophomore Hockey. 

" Within the bounds of modesty — convention's 
sweetest pat/' 



LOLA BRUM BACK 

STEPHENS CITY 
W. C. A.; Athletic Association; Alpha Literary So- 

"For she was jes' the quid kind 

Whose natures never vary, 
J ike streams that keep a summer mind 

Snow- hid in January," 



V. 
ciety 



MILDRED AILEEN BURFOOT 



A.; Athletic Assn- 



FENTRESS 

Alpha Literary Society; V. W. C. 
ciation. 

"Genteel in personagi 
( undiu l and equipage 
Noble by heritage, 
Generous and free." 



ELIZABETH BUSH 

LONG ISLAND, NEW YORK 

Glee Club; Reporter and Assistant Editor of Breeze; 
Serge an t-at- Arms and Chairman of Program Committee 
of Page Literary Society; V. W. C. A. ; Athletic Asso- 
ciation. 

"Her eye begets occasion for her wit; 
For every object that the one doth catch 
The other turns to a mirth-moving jest." 



EMILY BUSHONG 

PULASKI 

Y. VV. C. A.; Athletic Association; Alpha Literary So- 
ciety. 

"What ho, lads, what ho!" 



MARGARET CAMPBELL 

RICHMOND 

Student Council; Special Hockey; Class Hockey Leader; 
Varsity Swimming Squad; Class Swimming Leader; Class 
Hockey, Tennis and Swimming; French Circle; Page 
Literary Society; Assistant Business Manager Breeze. 

"So well to know her own, 

That what she tails to do or say 

Seems wisest, z'lrtuousest, dt'sereetcst, best." 



JENNIE MERCIA CASH 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

V. \Y. C. A. ; Athletic Association ; Breeze Typist ; 
Blue Stone Orchestra; Alpha Literary Society. 

"None but herself can be her parallel." 



LOUISE CAVE 



Y. W. C. A.; Athletic Association; Alpha Literary 
Society. 

"Wise to resolve and patient to perform." 



CHRISTOBEL CHARTERIS CHILDS 

ORANGE 

Literary Editor Breeze, 1930; Assistant Editor Breeze, 
1931; Sophomore Class Historian; Y. \Y. C. A.; Athletic 
Association ; Page Literary Society. 

"The pen wherewith thou dost so heavenly sing 
Is made of a quill from an angel's wing." 



FRANCES LOUISE CLARK 

DANVILLE 

Alpha Literary Society; Choral Club; Y. W. C. 
Athletic Association. 

"She whose inborn worth her acts commend, 
Of gentle soul, to human race a friend." 



SARAH KATHRYN CLARK 

GLADE SPRING 

Alpha Literary Society ; Freshman Hockey Team ; 
Freshman Basketball Team; Varsity Squad, 1929-'30-'31 ; 
Y. W. C. A. ; Athletic Association. 

"And frame your mind to mirth and merriment, 
Which bars a thousand harms and lengthens life." 



MAY VIRGINIA CLAYTOR 

NORTH RIVER 

Frances Sale Club; Euclid Club; Alpha Literary Society. 

"There is a kind of character in thy life, 

That to the observer doth thy history fully unfold." 

















ALICE IANE COLEMAN 



W. C. 



MURAT 

A. ; Athletic Association 



"Good humor only teaches charms to last, 
Still makes new conquests and maintains the 



past. 



MARIALYCE COLLIE 

DANVILLE 

W. C. A.; Athletic Association; Frances Sale Club. 

"Whatever she did was done with so much ease 
hi her alone 'twas natural to please." 



ELLEN REBECCA COMER 

ROANOKE 

Y. \\\ C. A.; Athletic Association; Chora 
Hockey ; Alpha Literary Society. 



Club; Class 



"Happy am I; front care I'm free! 
Why aren't they all eontentcd like me/" 



LUCY LEE COYNER 

WAYNESBORO 

Freshman and Sophomore Hockey, Basketball, Tennis 
ami Uaseball Teams; Varsity Hockey, Basketball and 
Tennis Teams; Captain Varsity Tennis, 1930-'31; Sopho- 
more Uasketball Sport Leader; Athletic Council ; Alpha 
Literary Society; Hinh School Club; V. \V. C. A. 

"Frolic glee was there. 

The will to do, the soul to dare." 



MARY VIRGINIA COYNER 

WAYNESBORO 

Athletic Association; Alpha Literary Society; Vice- 
President Lanier Literary Society; Cotillion Club; 
Frances Sale Club. 

"Of manner gentle — of affection mild." 



NELL VIRGINIA COYNER 

WAYNESBORO 

Varsity Basketball Team, 1929-'30, 1930-'31; Alpha 
Literary Society; Choral Club; Athletic Association; 
Varsity Tennis Team; Varsity Swimming Squad; Class 
Basketball, Swimming, and Tennis Teams; Frances Sale 
Club; Y. W. C. A. 

"Light of heart, light of step, 
Quick of wit, full of pep." 



MILDRED ELMA DICKERSON 

NATHALIE 

Choral Club; Y. W. C. A. ; Athletic Association. 

"A friend to all who knew her." 



FRANCES DIEHL 

NORTH RIVER 

Athletic Association. 

'Faith, hope, charity; but the great est of these 
is charity." 



ELIZABETH BURSON DISHMAN 

MARSHALL 

Y. W. C. A. ; Athletic Association. 

" Knotvlcdye comes, but wisdom lingers." 



CLARA BELLE DOVE 

GRETNA 

Alpha Literary Society; Athletic Association. 

"/'// talk a word with this same learned Thcban. 
'What is your study?' 



DOROTHY DRAYTON DOVE 

GRETNA 

Alpha Literary Society; Athletic Association. 

"Knowledge is the only fountain, both of the love and 
the principles of human liberty." 



CAMILLA KYGAR DOVEL 

ROCKINGHAM 
"Bashful sincerity and comely love." 








LOIS AGNES DREWRY 

CLIFTON FORCE 
Treasurer Le Cercle Franqais. 
"It scents the part of wisdom." 



LOUISE DUNFORD 

CHARLOTTESVILLE 

Y. W. C. A.; Athletic Association. 

" The a cut 1 1- minde by gentle deeds is knowne; 
For a m an by nothing is so well betrayed 
As by his manner." 



SARAH AMANDA DUTROW 

ROANOKE 

Stratford Dramatic Club; Page Literary Society ; 
Breeze Staff; Varsity Swimming Squad; Class Hockey 
and Swimming Teams. 



"Glad that I livi 



I." 



MARTHA ELIZABETH ELLISON 

ROANOKE 

Student Council; Secretary Page Literary Society; 
Secretary Sophomore Class; Scribblers; Schoolma'am 
Staff; Breeze Staff; French Circle; High School Club; 
Y. \Y. C. A. ; Athletic Association; House Committee 
Jackson Hall; Social Committee Y. W. C. A. 

" The (/lory of n firm, capacious mind." 



SARAH FACE 

HAM PT< ) N 

Cla--s Cheer Leader ; Assistant Cheer Leader; HI tie 
Si 1 1 in- Cotillion Club; Athletic Council ; Y. \V. C. A. ; 
Head Cheer Leader; Page Literary Society; Librarian 
( Ilee Club; Recorder of Points. 

"A sparkling personality, a sweet, lovable disposition, 

and an attractive appearance form a combination 
hard to excel." 



JULIA HAMMON FANSLER 



\v. 



MT. JACKSON 
C. A. ; Athletic Association. 



"A little nonsense now and then 
Is relished bv the wisest man." 



KATHERINE LEIGH FRANCIS 



Frances Sale Club; Alpha Literary Society; Athletic 
Association ; Y. W. C. A. 

"Modesty is to merit what shade is to figures in a pic- 
ture; it gives strength and makes it stand out." 



.MARTHA FRANKLIN 

SOUTH NORFOLK 

Honor Roll, Winter Quarter, 1930; Critic Lee Lit- 
erary Society; Secretary Frances Sale Club;Y. W. C. A.; 
Athletic Association; Choral Club. 

"A worthwhile girl is one zvhosc love of life 
is truly genuine." 



MARY KATHLEEN FRAZ1ER 

SPERRYVILLE 

Y. \V. C. A. ; Athletic Association ; Alpha Literary 
Society. 

"7 would help others out of a fellow feeling." 



ISABEL FRID1NGER 

HAGERSTOWN, MARYLAND 

Alpha Literary Society; Treasurer Sophomore Class; 
Freshman Hockey Sport Leader; Tennis Squad; Y. W. 
C. A. ; Athletic Association ; Uaseball Team ; Class 
Swimming. 

"The man that loves and laughs must sure do well." 



MARY VIRGINIA FUGATE 

CASTLEWOOD 

Athletic Association. 

'Wit now and then, struck smartly, shows a spark.' 



THELMA VIRGINIA FRYE 

LEESBURG 

High School Club; Alpha Literary Society; Y. \V. C. 
A. ; Athletic Association. 

"We know what she is 

But know not what she may be." 





MAURINE GIBSON 



Alpha Literary Society ; Athletic Association ; Y. 
\\ . C. A. 

"True to herself, true to her friends, 
True to her duty always." 



DOROTHY ELEANOR GILLIE 

PORTSMOUTH 

V. W. C. A.; Athletic Association. 

'.hi air of good humor ever surrounds her.' 



MABEL GORDON 

MECKLENBURG 

"Such a friend we like to have 
Happy, good-natured, and never dull." 



EVELYN GLADYS GROTON 

HALLWOOD 
"She walks the way of friendly hearts." 



MARY VIRGINIA GROVE 

LL'RAY 

Alpha Literary Society, '25-'26; Grammar (irade * lub, 
'25-'26; Athletic Association; V. VV. C. A. 

"She is all one would have ln-r." 



MARY MARGARET HAGA 

DANVILLE 

Blue Stone Cotillion Club; Choral Club; Breeze Staff; 
Basketball Sport Leader; Varsity Basketball Squad, '29- 
'30, '3IV31 ; Varsity Hockey Squad; Treasurer Athletic 
Association ; Alpha Literary Society; Y. \Y. C. A. ; Kas- 
ketball Class Team, '29-'30, '30-'31; Hockey Class Team. 

"Full of fuu and true as steel," 






VIRGINIA HALLET 

CHERITON 

Lanier Literary Society; Cotillion Club; Athletic Asso- 
ciation; Y. W. C. A.; Alpha Literary Society. 

"A burst of music down an unlistcniny street." 



BERTHA CATHERINE HALTERMAN 

PALMYRA 

Y. W. C. A.; Athletic Association. 

"She has always a cheerful face, an excellent thing 
in this world." 



LEE WARREN HAMMER 

HARRISONBURG 

'Kind hearts are more than coronets.' 



MELVINA B. HAMMOND 

LAKE MAHOPAC, NEW YORK 

V. W. C. A.; Alpha Literary Society; High School 
Club; Athletic Association. 

"She was always ready, and a willing heart she had." 



DOROTHY MABURY HARLEY 

ROUND HILL 

Vice-President of Glee Club; Blue Stone Cotillion 
Club; Lanier Literary Society; Sophomore Council; Pro- 
gram Committee Y. W. C. A.; Athletic Association. 

"And they deep eyes amid the gloom shine like jewels 
in a shroud." 



BETTY SALLIE HARRIS 

ROANOKE 

Y. W. C. A.; Athletic Association. 

"Gentle of speech, beneficent of mind. 








DOROTHY LOUISE HARRIS 

CARSON 

V. \\\ C. A.; Athletic Association; Choral Club; Alpha 
Literary Society. 

"There was a distance in her look 
That made us look again." 



EMILY CAROLINE HARRISON 

RICHMOND 

Y. \V. C. A.; Athletic Association. 

"Plrst with u joy that only she 
Of nil alive shall ever know." 



LOUISE HENDERSON 

BROOKNEAL 

Athletic Association; Varsity Basketball ; Page Lit- 
erary Society; Choral Club; Sophomore Class Baseball. 

"But whether we live or whether we die — Here's fuck!" 



MILDRED HENDERSON 

SOUTHERN PINES, N. C. 

Page Literary Society; Art Club; Schoolma'am Art 
Committee; Breeze Staff; Varsity Swimming Team ; V. 
\Y. C. A. ; Athletic Association ; Sophomore Cheer 
Leader ; Sophomore Swimming Team. 

"O give me new figures! I can't i/o on dancing 
The same that were taught me ten seasons ago!" 



KITH HENSHAW 

MADISON 

Alpha Literary Society; Y. \V. C. A. 

"Jolly yet serious, fun-loving yet sincere." 



LILLIAN HICKS 

EVINGTON 

Blue Stone Cotillion Club; Chairman Program Com 
mittee Lee Literary Society; V. W. C. A.; Treasurer 
Trances Sale Club; Athletic Association ; Choral Chili. 



'It 



good to lengthen to the last a sunny mood.' 



ALBERTA HJNEBAUGH 

CUMBERLAND, MARYLAND 

"And cloudy the day or stormy the night, 
The sky of her heart was always bright." 



JENNY LIND LUCAS HOCKMAN 

WINCHESTER 

Y. W. C. A. ; Athletic Association ; Cotillion Club; 
Lanier Literary Society; College Dance Orchestra; Busi- 
ness Manager Blue Stone Orchestra; Class Hockey Team. 

"Your barony is sky and land, 

From morning's start to the night's close." 



LILLIAN ALEXANDER HOLLAND 

WILMINGTON 

Alpha Literary Society; Y. W. C. A. ; Athletic Asso- 
ciation. 

"How are you, dear world, this morning?" 



VIRGINIA HESS HOLSINGER 

HARRISONBURG 
Day Students' Club; Athletic Association. 
"Kind words arc the music of the world." 



BEULAH HOLICAN HOLT 

CULLEN 

Y. \Y. C. A. ; Athletic Association. 

"Full of a gentle kindliness 
Her looks and language arc." 



RUTH VIRGINIA HOLT 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Y. \V. C. A. ; Athletic Association; 
Society. 



Alpha Literary 



"Who docs the best his circumstances allow 
Does well, acts nobly; angels could no more.' 





LOUISE CRAWFORD HOOKS 

WARSAW, NORTH CAROLINA 

Y. W. C. A.; Athletic Association; Secretary-Treasurer 
Alpha Literary Society, Group 1; Schoolma'am Staff, 
1929-'3U; Art Club; Cotillion Club; Treasurer Lanier 
Literary Society. 

"Like glimpses of forgotten dreams." 



SUSIE BETH HUDSON 

LURAY 

Y. W. C. A. ; Athletic Association. 

"But chiefly, the mould of a man's fortune is in 
his own hands." 



LAURA ELLEN HUMPHRIES 

RICHMOND 

Athletic Association; Alpha Literary Society. 

"In friendship I early was taught to believe." 



PEGGIE JOHNSON 

CLIFTON FORGE 
'Not ulmi we give, but what we share' 



GERTRUDE ELIZABETH JONES 

GETZ 
Y. \V. C. A. ; Athletic Association; Student Volunteer. 
"The mildest manners and the gentlest heart." 



SARA MARGARET JONES 

SPRING GROVE 

Y. \Y. C. A.; Alpha Literary Society; Euclid Club; 
Athletic Association. 

"I hare a heart with room for every joy," 



LENA SUE JOYCE 

CRITZ 

Alpha Literary Society; Y. W. C. A.; Athletic Asso- 
ciation. 

"Who pleases one against his will." 



MARTHA LOUISE KELLER 

FISHERS HILL 

Athletic Association; Choral Club. 

"Strong reasons make strong actions." 



THELMA MALINDA KIDD 

BEDFORD 

Y. W. C. A. 

"My heart is ever at your service." 



ANN ELIZABETH KINGSOLVER 

CLARENDON 

Y. W. C. A.; Athletic Association; Alpha Literary 
Society; Choral Club. 

"I am the master of my fate, 
I am the captain of my soul." 



MARGARET LACKEY 

LEXINGTON 

Athletic Association; Y. \V. C. A.; Choral Club, '29- 
31 ; Frances Sale Club; Alpha Literary Society. 

"A foot more light, a step more true 
Ne'er from the heath flower dashed the dew." 



FRANCES LAND 

DANVILLE 

Mechanics Editor of the Breeze ; Vice-President of 
Choral Club; Alpha Literary Society; Y. \Y. C. A. ; 
Athletic Association. 

"Sweet promptings into kindest deeds 
Were in her very looks." 





VESTA LANDES 

ROCKINGHAM 

Scribblers; Day Students' flub. 

"She hat It a natural wise sin\ erity, 
A simple truthfulness." 



MARY KATHRYN LASLEY 

ZION 

House Chairman Carter House; Athletic Association. 
"Gentle in thought, benevolent in deed." 



OTTIE MADELINE LEAVELL 

WEYERS CAVE 

Y. \Y. C. A. Choir; Athletic Association ; Alpha Lit- 
erary Society. 

"Gentle to hear, kindly to judge." 



JANET M. LOW'RIE 

PINAR DEL RIO, CUBA 

President Freshman Class; Class Swimming, Hockey, 
and Uaseball Teams, '30; Class Swimming and Hockey 
Tea iii', '31; Page Literary Society; Scribblers; B recce 
Staff; Secretary French Circle; Presidents Council ; 
Varsity Swimming Team. 

"What is to come we kiwn' not, but we k>toii' 
that what has been was </ood." 



SARAH WINTERS McCUE 

FT. DEFIANCE 

Y. W. C. A.; Alpha Literary Society; Athletic Asso- 
ciation; Hiking Club. 

"By her innocence she awes evil from her." 



ELSIE JUANITA McGEE 

VINTON 
Alpha Literary Society; Y. \Y. C. A.; Athletic Association. 

"With smiles for the joyful, 

With tea>s for the weeper." 



LOUISE MeMELLON 

Alpha Literary Society; Y. W. C. A.; Athletic Asso- 
ciation; Freshman Representative Student Government 
Electoral Board. 

"A sweet, modest little soul, blooming tenderly in 
a shady place." 



ANN LYNOEN McPHERSON 

BUCHANAN 

Schoolma'am Art Committee; Art Club; Freshman 
Hockey Sport Leader, 192S; Freshman and Sophomore 
Hockey Teams; Freshman Basketball Squad; Freshman 
Baseball Team; Varsity Hockey, 1928 and 1930; Choral 
Club; Athletic Association; Y. W. C. A. 

"I've made it a practice to put all my troubles in the 
bottom of my heart and sit on the lid and smile." 



GEORGIA FRANCES MALOY 

MCDOWELL 

Y. \Y. C. A.; A'pha Literary Society; Frances Sale 
Club; Athletic Association. 

"Steadfast and tender in the hour of need." 



MYRTLE LOUISE MANBY 

NORFOLK 

Athletic Association; Alpha Literary Society; Choral 
Club; Y. W. C. A. 

"A mind rejoicing in the light." 



LOUISE MAPP 

NASSAWADOX 

Glee Club; Art Club; Sergeant-at-Arms Lanier Lit- 
erary Society; Secretary Cotillion Club; Athletic Asso- 
ciation ; Y. \V. C. A. 

"Gentle in mien, words, and temper." 



HAZEL MAGNOLIA MARSHALL 

STONY POINT 

Hiking Club; Freshman Basketball Team; Freshman 
Hockey Team; Y. W. C. A.; Alpha Literary Society; 
Athletic Association. 

"In thy heart the dew of youth." 





SALLY CHRISTINE MARSHALL 

CREWE 

Athletic Association ; Y. \V. C. A. ; Chairman Program 
Committee Alpha Literary Society; Hiking Club; Choral 
Club. 

"Always busy, always merry." 



DOROTHY ALICE MARTIN 

NORFOLK 

Athletic Association; Y. \\\ C. A.; Art Club; Page 
Literary Society; Stratford Dramatic Club; Scribblers; 
President Sophomore Class; Student Council ; Breese 
Staff; Member Campus Relations Committee. 

"To those who know thee not. no words can paint ! 

And those who know thee, know nil words die faint!" 



FRANCES MASENGILL 

NORFOLK 

Cotillion Club; Lanier Literary Society ; Athletic Asso- 
ciation ; V. \Y. C. A. 

"And all about the soeial a il- 
ls sweeter for hei < Oming." 



ELVA VIRGINIA MASON 



\v. C. 



LOUISA 

A.; Athlctii 



"Merrily, merrily shall I live now 
Under the blossom that Intuits on th 



Association. 

bough. 



NELL MATTHEWS 

CHARLIE HOPE 

Y, \Y. I". A.; Athletic Association. 

"It'ho knows nothing base 
Fears nothing known." 



Ml XX IE AUSTIN MAY 



BERGTON 



Society; Y. 
"Strength of mind is exercise, not rest." 



High School Club; Alpha Literary 
C. A,; Athletic Association. 



\V. 






LAURA AXX MELCHOR 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

Page Literary Soriety; Secretary Choral Club; Fresh- 
man Class Cheer Leader; Assistant College Cheer Leader; 
Sergeant-at-Arms Freshman Class; Y. W. C. A. Choir; 
Music Committee Y. \Y. C. A. ; Blue-Stone Orchestra; 
Athletic Council. 

"7 ivill be the tfladdcst thing under the sun." 



AUDREY LOUISE MILES 

CHINCOTEAGUE 

Y. \V. C. A.; Athletic Association; Alpha Literary So- 
ciety; Typist for the Breeze. 

"A happy soul, that all the way 
To heaven hath a summer's dav." 



LULA MAE MILLER 

AUGUSTA 

"A day for toil, an hour for sport, 
But for a friend is life too short." 



JANE HELEN MILLER 

STONY POINT 

Y. \V. C. A. ; Athletic Association; Alpha Literary 
Society. 

"To aet the part of a true friend requires more con- 
scientious feeling than to fill with credit and 
complacency any other station or 
capacity in social life." 



ELEANOR HOLT MOORE 

GASTONIA, N. C. 

Y. W\ C. A. ; Athletic Association ; Lanier Literary 
Society; Glee Club; JEolian Music Club. 

"Music, that gent Her on the spirit lies 
Than tired eyelids upon tired eyes." 



MARY VIRGINIA MORGAN 

NEW POINT 
Alpha Literary Society; Choral Club, 1930'31. 
"The noblest mind the best contentment has." 














ELLA MAE MOSSBURG 

Shl.LMAX, MARYLAND 

Y. \V. C. A, ; Athletic Association ; Alpha Literary 
Society. 

"A mixture of quietness and lovableness." 



GLADYS VIRGINIA MYERS 

TIMBERVILLE 

Vice-President Day Students' Club; Secretary Euclid 
Club; Athletic Association; French Circle; Alpha Lit- 
erary Society. 

"Happy am I, from care I'm free! 

Why aren't they all contented like me?" 



LOUISE THOMAS NEAL 

RINGGOLD 

Lanier Literary Society; V. \V. C. A. ; Athletic Asso- 
ciation; V. W. C. A. Choir, 1929-'30; Cotillion Club. 

"Life is lo be fortified by many friendships." 



DOROTHY VIRGINIA NEEDY 

H A< 1ERSTI )\V N , M ARYLA ND 

Athletic Association; Secretary Freshman Class; St rat 
ford Dramatic Club; Y. W. C. A.; Vice President V. 
\Y. C. A. Choir; Secretary Cotillion Club; Lanier Lit- 
erary Society. 

"A lovely lady garmented in light 
For her own beauty." 



VIRGINIA NEWMAN 

BASKERVILLE 

Alpha Literary Society; Athletic Association; V. W. 
. A. ; Freshman Baseball Team. 






"Away from 



es and troubles fly." 



GLADYS ELLEN OGDEN 

NATURAL BRIDGE STATION 

Alpha Literary Society; Athletic Association; Y. \Y. C. A. 

"Because the world runs on. 

She runs on too. 

Steady, she does whatever is t>> </"." 



VIRGINIA ORANGE 

EX MORE 

Blue-Stone Orchestra; Lanier Literary Society; Frances 
Sale Club; Blue-Stone Cotillion Club; V. \V. C. A.; 
Athletic Association. 



" You are cool like silvt 



(Did von smile." 



ROSA LEE OTT 



HARRISONBURG 



Glee Club; .-Eolian Club; Alpha Literary Society; Ath- 
letic Association. 

"The music in my heart I bore 
Long after it zvas heard no more." 



EMILYN PETERSON 

LAKE CITY, FLORIDA 

Page Literary Society ; Y. \V. C. A. ; Class Sport 
Leader Basketball; Class Basketball Team, 1929-'30, 1930- 
•31; Varsity Basketball Squad, 1929-'30, 1930-'31; Varsity 
Hockey Squad ; Athletic Council ; Student Council ; As- 
sistant Business Manager B recce; Sophomore Swimming 
Sport Leader. 

"So many worlds, so many things, 
so much to do." 



VIRGINIA PETTIT 

ARLINGTON 

"In framing an artist, art has thus decreed 
To make some good, but others to excel." 



KATHRYN ELIZABETH PIERCE 

RECTORTOWN 

Alpha Literary Society; Y. \Y. C. A. ; Athletic Asso- 
ciation. 

"No pride of self thy service hath." 



HARRIET POWELL 

MCKENNEY 

Y. \Y. C. A.; Alpha Literary Society. 

''Thy sacramental liturgies, the joy of doing good." 








HORTENSE POYNER 

Norfolk 

President Freshman Class, 1930 Summer School ; Page 
Literary Society; Tennis Sport Leader ; Athletic Coun- 
cil ; Varsity Tennis. 

"A jolly good sport in rain <>>■ shine." 



CLYDE RAMSEY 



( horal Club; Frances Sale Club; Y. \V. C. A.; Ath- 
letic Association. 

"A lovable, jolly way she had." 



LOIS WEAVER REVERCOMB 

PEOLA MILLS 

V. W. C. A.; Athletic Association; Alpha Literary 
Society. 

"A willing heart and a cheerful face." 



LENA WILSON REYNOLDS 

ROANOKE 

Athletic Association ; Y. \V. C. A. 

'The rule of my life is to make business a pleasure. 



VIRGINIA IRVING RICHARDS 

WINCHES IKK 

Student Council; Vice-President Page Literary Society; 
Athletic Association ; Y. W. C. A. ; House Chairman 
Ashhy Dormitory. 

"<J a let, steadfast and true ; 

Xot much talk — ,j great s%veet utter a nee." 



SALLIE RICHAKDSOX 

KF.NTS STORE 

Y. \Y. C. A. ; Athletic Association. 

' The gentle mind by gentle deeds is known/' 



■i 



IDA VIRGINIA ROACH 

DANVILLE 

Lanier Literary Society; Cotillion Club; Varsity Bas- 
ketball Squad; Varsity Hockey Squad; Freshman Hockey 
Team; Freshman Basketball Team; Athletic Editor 
Breeze; Y. \Y. C. A.; Choral Club; Athletic Association. 

"Light of heart, light of step. 
Quick of zvit, full of pep." 



MARY LOUISE ROARK 

NATHALIE 

Y. W. C. A.; Athletic Association. 

"My soul still flics above me for the quarry it shall find.' 



MARGARET RAMEY RUCKER 

DELAPLANE 

Y. \V. C. A. ; Alpha Literary Society; Frances Sale 
Club; Athletic Association. 

"There arc no friends like old friends, 
And none so good and true." 



AZILE HOWARD SCHWARZ 

DANVILLE 

President Choral Club, '30-'31 ; Alpha Literary So- 
ciety; Secretary Student Volunteer Band ; Y. W. C. A. ; 
Tennis Team; Athletic Association. 

"On the other side the world we're over-due." 



CHARLOTTE ANN SHAW 

KERSHAW, SOUTH CAROLINA 
'The toils of honor diynify repose." 



KATHRYN LOUISE SHENK 

KIMBALL 

Alpha Literary Society; Y. W. C. A.; Athletic Asso- 
ciation. 

"And I to my pledged word am true." 





MARGARET ELIZABETH SHEPHERD 

LYNCHBURG 

V. W. C. A.; Choral Club; Alpha Literary Society; 
Athletic Association. 

"Her ways are ways of pleasantness." 



LOUISE H. SHOEMAKER 

BROADWAY 

Alpha Literary Society; Choral Club; Athletic Asso 
ciation. 

" The two noblest of things, which are sweetness 
and light." 



JOYCE VIRGINIA SHOWALTER 

IRON GATE 
"All good things are ours." 



EMMA JANE SHULTZ 

STAUNTON 

V. W. C. A.; Athletic Association; Secretary l'age Lit- 
erary Society; Chairman Program Committee of French 
Circle. 

"Precious packages arc put up "' small parcels." 



KATHLEEN SNA IT 

MIDDLETOWN 

Athletic Association; Y. W. C. A.; Alpha Literary 
Society. 

"A merry heart (joes all the day." 



DOROTHY FRANCES SPENCER 

CHARLESTON, WEST VIRGINIA 
'Thou bust the patience and the faith of saints.' 



PRUDENCE HAIXS SPOONER 

FRANKLIN 

Alpha Literary Society; Choral Club; Vice-President 
Stratford Dramatic Club; French Circle; Chairman Pro- 
gram Committee Lanier Literary Society ; V. W. C. A. ; 
Athletic Association; Standards Committee. 



' When done bv her. 



tts 



well done." 



BARBARA STEELE 

STEPHENS CITY 

V. \V. C. A. ; Athletic Association; Alpha Literary 
Society; Blue-Stone Orchestra; Le Cercle Francais. 

"The time to be happy is now." 



RUTH BRADLEY STEPHENSON 

PETERSBURG 

Choral Club; Athletic Association; Alpha Literary So- 
ciety; Y. W. C. A. 

"Jolly and jovial, happy and gay," 



VIRGINIA LAIDLEY STERN 

CHARLESTON, WEST VIRGINIA 

Athletic Council. 

"Serene amidst alarms; 

Inflexible in faith; invincible in arms." 



CAROLINE BARBOUR STRATTON 

GORDONSVILLE 

Lanier Literary Society; Cotillion Club; Alpha Lit- 
erary Society; Treasurer Freshman Class; Chairman Pro- 
gram Committee French Circle; Y. W. C. A. ; Athletic 
Association. 

"A tiny maiden full of grace, 
Full of wit, and fair of face." 



EVELYN STULTZ 

HARRISONBURG 

Athletic Association; Y. W. C. A.; Alpha Literary 
Society. 

"Only the actions of the just 
Can truly be termed ideal." 








MARTHA SURBER 

CLIFTON FORGE 

Art Club; Y. \V. C. A.; Athletic Association; Frances 
Sale Club; SchooLMa'aM Art Committee. 

"She's full of spirit, laughter and fun; 

Her loyalty is fine; 

Hkw many a mile I'd gladly run 

To have her a friend of nun,." 



MARGARET TATE 

LEBANON 

(dee Club; Y. W. C. A.; Athletic Association. 

"Cupid hath not, in all his quiver's choice, 
An arrow for the heart like a sweet voice." 



MILDRED TATE 

LEBANON 

Choral Club; Y. W. C. A.; Athletic Association. 

"Anyway yon take her, you will find, as we have found. 
There is nothing in her lacking; she is true, and safe, 
and sound." 



MARGARET VIRGINIA TAYLOR 

HALLWOOD 

A pleasant t onvcrsationalist, with her cut en ess and 
ready zvit." 



NELLE MAE TAYLOR 

EAST STONE GAP 

Y. \V. C. A.; Athletic Association; President Debating 
Club; Student Council; High School Club; Alpha Lit- 
erary Society. 



"Pep, good Inn 
Blended with i 



-. animation, 
cady smile." 



CATHLEEN VIRGINIA THOMPSON 

WHITE POST 

Euclid Club; Y. W. C. A.; Freshman and Sophomore 
Hockey Teams; Athletic Association. 

"That best portion of a ttood man's life. 
His little, nameless, unremembered arts 
Of kindness and of lore." 



ELOISE SLOAN THOMPSON 

CREWE 

Debating Club; Choral Club; High School Club; Group 
Leader Alpha Literary Society; Y. W. C. A. ; Hiking 
Club Leader; Athletic Association. 

"A cheery greeting for all she has 
And a deft confidence in -what she says." 



ETHEL SMITH TOWNSEND 

CHERITON 

V. \Y. C. A.; Athletic Association; Alpha Literary So- 
ciety; Typist for Breeze. 

"Be not the first by whom the new arc tried, 
Nor vet the last to lav the old aside." 



LILLIE OLA TUCKER 

CREWE 

V. W. C. A.; Athletic Association; Alpha Literary 
Society; Choral Club; High School Club; Hiking Club. 

"What will come and must come, shall come well." 



ELIZABETH TUDOR 

THOMASVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 

Publicity Committee Y. W. C. A.; Alpha Literary So- 
ciety; Vice-President Sophomore Class; Sophomore 
Council. 

"There's a certain twinkle in her eyes 
Speaks of the mischief that therein lies." 



LOIS FLORENCE VAN PELT 



Y. \Y. C. A.; Athletic Association; Sophomore Tennis 
Team ; Cotillion Club. 

"Quite the jolliest girl we know, 
Full of pep and heaps of go." 





LUCIE MACON VELLINES 

NEWPOR1 NEWS 

Glee Club; Secretary and Chairman Program Com- 
mittee of Page Literary Society; Student Council; Treas- 
urer and Service Committee Y. W. C. A.; Athletic Asso- 
ciation. 



"Ability with a nevi 
And ca 



-end\ 

she 



tiii sourt 



of dry wit .' 



BARBARA NAOMI VIA 

EARLYSVILLE 

Athletic Association; Y. \Y. C. A.; Choral Club; Alpha 
Literary Society. 

"She met success in work and play, as well as with 
her friends." 



SARAH LOUISE WATKINS 

KENTS STORE 

French Circle ; Alpha Literary Society; Euclid Club; 
Assistant House Chairman Carter House; House Chair- 
man Carter House; High School Club; Y. W. C. A. ; 
Athletic Association; Scholarship Work. 

"I work for knowledge . 
And not for notoriety.'' 



MARY MILDRED WEADON 

WATERFORD 

4-H Club, 1929-*30, '30-'31; Choral Club; Y. \V. C. A.; 
Athletic Association ; Student Volunteer Hand ; Fresh- 
man Hockey Team. 

"The willingness of the doing doth express 
No other but the doer's willingness." 



"Sine 



RUTH HILL WEDDLE 

HILLSVILLE 

Alpha Literary Society. 
and true, 1 stnte in all my best to do." 



HELEN WHITEHEAD 

NORFOLK 

Alpha Literary Society; Y. W. C. A.; Athletic Asso- 
ciation. 

"A smile for all, a greeting glad, 
A lozxiblc, jolly zvay she had." 



LILLIAN PIERCY WILLIAMS 

WELDON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Lee Literary Society; Cotillion Club. 

"Let the world slide, let the world go; 
A fig for care, and a fig for woe." 



MARY BLANCHE WILLIAMS 

SOUTH NORFOLK 

Croup Chairman Alpha Literary Society; Y. \Y. C. A. 
Athletic Association. 

"The mildest manners and the gentlest heart." 



GLADYS BUSSEY WILSON 

CLARENDON 

Business Manager Choral Club; Secretary-Treasurer 
Alpha Literary Society, Group III; Athletic Association ; 
Sophomore Electoral Board ; Y. \V. C. A. 

"Still zvaters run deep." 



Y. W. C. 
ciation. 



LORETTA SUE WIRE 

LOVETTSVILLE 
A. ; Alpha Literary Society; Athletic Asso- 

"An ideal girl in every way — 
A kind not found every day." 





LORAINE WISE 



HAHKISOXBUKl. 



Day Students' Club; Athletic Association; Hi^'h School 
Club. 

"Wise to resolve and patient to perform." 



MARY PRISCILLA WILEY 

MILL GAP 

Choral Club; Athletic Association; Y. W. C. A. 
"An overwhelming joy she finds in life." 



MARGARET FAULKNER WOODROOF 

PETERSBURG 

Alpha Literary Society; Choral Club; V. \V. C. A. 
Athletic Association. 

"A wonderful friend." 



JESSIE MacDOUGALL WRIGHT 

NORFOLK 

Alpha Literary Society ; Y. W. C. A. ; Treasurer of 
Choral Club; Athletic Association; Class Swimming. 

"J ust bubbling over." 



IDA JOSEPHINE WYATT 

I UPELO, MISSISSIPPI 

Athletic Association; Alpha Literary Society; Choral 
Club; V. VV. C. A. 

"Youth and mirthful jollity." 



LILA PRICE WYATT 

MT. AIRY 

Chairman Program Committee Alpha Literary Society; 
House Committee Carter House; V. W. C. A.; Euclid 
Club; Athletic Association. 

"Genteel in personage, 
Conduct and equipage; 
Noble by heritage, 
Generous and free." 



.OL'ISE ELIZABETH WYATT 



V. \Y. C. 



MT. AIRY 
A.; Athletic Association. 



■The 



corld is a looking-glass, and gives back to every 
man the reflection of his own face." 



ALICE EVELYN UNDERWOOD 

NORTH FORK 

V. W. C. A.; Athletic Association. 

"Pep, good humor, animation, 
Blended with a rcadv smile." 



LILLIAN AMANDA YANCEY 

HARRISONBURG 

V. W. C. A. ; Athletic Association ; Day Students' 
Club; Choral Club. 



'Gentle in manne 



firm in reality 



VIRGINIA ZEHMER 

MCKENNEY 

Y. \Y. C. A. ; Athletic Association ; Cotillion Club; 
Sophomore Council; Dance Orchestra; Sergeant-at-Arms 
Sophomore Class. 

"On with the dance! let joy be unconfincd ; 

No sleep till morn, when youth and pleasure meet." 




Sophomore Class Hislory 




X THE record of every nation, events that apparently mean 
nothing, items of little or no importance, results that are insig- 
nificant as viewed by outsiders, stand out prominently — veritable 
landmarks of history to that people. 

So it is with every class ; and to every graduating class 
especially comes the cognizance of deeply imbedded, heretofore 
unrecognized truths — realizations of just how much certain incidents in our school 
life here meant to us. The recognition that, for some of us at least, college life is 
at an end is overwhelming, and a flood of memories surge over us. 

First — September 23, 1929 — what a wealth of food for meditation — and in 
what throngs does the date conjure up in our minds the happenings of that day — 
the era of our college life begun ! 

The teas, receptions, dances, and parties which filled our social calendar recall 
many hours plesantly spent which otherwise would have been indeed dull and 
drear. Many moons will come and go ere we lose the memory of some of them. 

The perusal of the gems of wisdom found between the pseudo-innocent 
purple-and-gold covers of the handbook seemed to us, in our ignorance, rigorous 
torture. Even that phase of our freshman life is cloaked now with an atmosphere 
of pleasure which kind memory always leaves. 

Excitement ran high at the Old Girl-New Girl basketball game, and even a 
lofty senior here and there was known to doff her dignity for a while at least and 
join in the cheering. Even though we didn't exactly win that game, we felt that 
we were a great deal richer in sportsmanship than ever before. 

Then one beautiful golden day in October — one of those glorious autumnal 
days you read about — a wedding was solemnized. With vows of undying friend- 
ship, loyalty, and love, the Old Girls and the New pledged their troth. 

We signed our first Student Government pledge three weeks later. With her 
individual signature, each realized that she gave her solemn pledge to uphold Stu- 
dent Government and all that the name implies. 

Hockey season came and went, and with our pride in our team's victories 
went an intense interest in the game. Even those of us who were not athletically 
inclined seemed not at all averse to learning the rules. "Strange," you say? But 
not so strange when one recalls that even the most charming of instructors gives 
tests — and the inevitable exam ! 

The most longed-for day of the whole year came — the beginning of Christmas 
holidays. With light hearts but increased avoirdupois, we boarded trains, busses, 
and cars for home. Never was vacation more enjoyed, and never did time seem 
to go by quite so quickly. 

But all pleasant things must end, and we soon found ourselves back at school 
with renewed vigor and zeal for classes, sports, and Liberal Arts Commissions. 
(In later years, along with other thoughts of our freshman year at H. T. C, will 
go vivid memories of the long-heralded visits of Liberal Arts Commissions!) 



Joyfully we viewed the enviable records of the basketball team and thrilled at 
the thought of our team. 

The swimming varsity's triumph brought forth more pride — pardonable pride 
when one reflects that, after all, the posession of four members of that team does 
call for a little excitement. 

Valentines ! — and a party for our Big Sisters, the Juniors. Shall any of us 
ever forget the beauty of the queen, the handsomeness of the king, the jollity of 
the court — or, for that matter, any of the events of that evening? 

Gay red jackets, flamboyant kerchiefs, tinkling tambourines, lilting song — 
Freshman Day ! Throughout that day in April, the gipsy red-and-white reigned, 
and that evening, with "The Gipsy Camp," a most successful day came to an end. 

Vacation ! — and three months of untrammeled freedom. Our first summer 
holiday as college students naturally was an eventful one. Everyone at home 
was so much interested in us and so anxious to see how we had changed. 

The three months passed as if on winged feet, and we soon found ourselves 
back at Harrisonburg — Sophomores ! Everything took on a different aspect from 
that of our freshman year, for were we not Old Girls now? We were truly 
conscious of our newly-found dignity and strove in every way to live up to it and 
to what everyone expected of us. The increased supply of meal cuts, the "even- 
ings out," and other privileges — all these we truly appreciated and took ad- 
vantage of. 

The first activity which united the Sophomore Class into a composite whole 
was the inter-class hockey games. The Sophomores here proved their mettle with 
a splendid record. Then, too, we claimed one of the varsity members as our 
very own. 

Basketball proved another source of common interest, especially because of 
the fact that two varsity players were members of our class. 

At last arrived the crowning event — our day of days ! On March 6, 1931, we 
celebrated our second Class Day. Originality and modernity were everywhere 
evinced by the distinctive scheme of the occasion. The green-and-white incorpor- 
ated in the headgear and impedimenta of the Sophomore aviatrix and, indeed, in 
every decoration of the day — even to the most minute detail — was very much in 
evidence. That night the Sophomore Class scored a grand success with the orig- 
inal production, "High-minded." The next day we were thrilled beyond expres- 
sion when we were informed that pictures of us in our "airy" costumes, in air- 
plane formation, were to be made for publication, and that our originality re- 
ceived the approbation of our fellow students. 

Then the Senior-Sophomore Dance — what more pleasant could we have had 
than that ? Everything was wonderful — the decorations — the music — everything ! 
It could truly be said that a more delightful dance was never given at Harrison- 
burg, and that the Seniors should certainly receive full credit for instituting and 
carrying out such a charming affair. 

Everyone and everything, sooner or later, must come to an end — a terminus. 
For some of us the break comes now ; for others it is delayed for two more years. 
Some of us walk across the platform — the cynosure of all eyes — and receive 
material evidence, in the form of a diploma, of knowledge gained, viewpoints 
broadened, and dreams realized. It is to those who graduate, while the rest of 
us look on proudly, that we would say a word of appreciation for what they have 
contributed to the class. We wish for them every iota of possible success which 
they, as individuals, may achieve. May those of us who return next year strive to 
carry high the standards which they have set for us and to uphold the traditions 
of our Alma Mater! 

— Cheistobel Chu.ds 



Sophomore Prophecy 



MY DIARY OF 1941 
January 1 

Dear Diary, I made a resolution last night as the New Year rang in. For the first time 
in my life I have a year to spend exactly as I please. I still wonder why I chose Standard 
Oil, but I made a sweep anyway. When I was sophomore prophet at H. T. C. I prophesied 
a wild and romantic future for each of my classmates. Now I'd like to know how near I 
came to the real truth. My resolution is to find out what each of those classmates is doing. 
Do you think I can do it? Wait and see. 

January 14 

I haven't made much progress since the last entry, hut I'm going about it in an organized 
manner now. I got out the annual of '31 and reacquainted myself with the face of every girl. 
The alphabetical order of pictures and addresses helps a lot. 

It seems that Sidney Aldhizer, after making good money as a teacher, gave it up lor the 
wanderlust. She is now in Naples. Frieda Baily is abroad too — in Paris modeling for a 
very competent young artist. Jack Baker is head of the Red Cross stations throughout Vir- 
ginia. Great work. Had tea with Man Haga yesterday. She has a book-nook in Wash- 
ington, the cutest thing, and the latest in poetry. No, she's not married. 

January 27 

Dearest Diary. I've dune lots lately. Alice Ashby, though married, is teaching in New 
Jersey. Catherine Bard is in China doing missionary work. Who'd've thunk it! Fthel Bat- 
ten and Ruby Powers have a fine dairy near Lacey Spring. Elizabeth Biller has opened a 
school for girls in Baltimore. Frances Blackwell is a nurse at Johns Hopkins Hospital — one 
of their best. Gladda Blose and her husband have a huge farm near Harrisonburg. Those 
Booker twins, Adele and Ruth, are doing a sister-act in New : York Vaudeville. And run- 
ning the most modernistic filling station, near Lexington, is Elizabeth Boggs ! Mary Page 
Bondurant married a guy with oodles of money, and she's reclining in the lap of luxury. Oh, 
yes, Betty Bush wrote me from London. She's over there studying voice. She is to be 
married in New York in June. 

February 3 

I'm still enthusiastic in spite of the hard work. Bernice Bowden suddenly developed a 
genius for sculpture and already has won several prizes. Margaret Boykin is known as the 
"Woman Skipper" and has her yacht and uniform to match. Marian Bradham has been sent 
by the government on a mission to Porto Rico. Lola Brumback must have married a cow- 
boy ; she's away out on a Texas ranch. Social service work has won a lot of those sophs : 
Mildred Burfoot is helping the slums in New York and Martha Ellison the Y. W. C. A. 
Marialyce Collie is with the Salvation Army in Detroit. My latest news was that Ratie Lee 
Burton is the head waitress in the Ritz-Carlton in N. Y. She says it's all due to practice in 
dear old Blue-Stone. 

February 11 

Dearest Diary, great results since last entry! Emily Bushong sends word she's happy in 
a Tennessee cottage. Mercia Cash and her husband are in the roofing business; and Louise 
Cave and Lois Revercomb are traveling agents for the Revised-Book-of-Rnowledge com- 
pany. The well-known Christobel Childs has written several successful novels. Margaret 
Campbell and Bob Lackey have a dancing school in Richmond, where the Dove twins are 
running an electrical shop. Pat Clark, the Coyner twins, and Bernice English are on the 
Women's National Athletic Board for Basketball. See what H. T. C. did for them? Here's 
another keeping a book-shop — Frances Land. The Philippines got a great many of our class: 
Izzy Fridinger, Camilla Dovel, Mabel Gordon and Eunice Fansler; while Elizabeth Dishman, 



Mae Claytor, Frances Diehl and Madeline Leavell are teaching in Cuba. They say, "It pays; 
come on down !" Mary Coyner has a position in Mary Baldwin College, teaching voice. 
Quite a few of our bunch landed jobs in colleges. Helen Whitehead is at Hollins, Ida Roach 
at Farmville, Pete Peterson at the University of Florida, all teaching physical ed. Lois 
Drewry and Yesta Landes are teaching French and history respectively at Westhampton. 

February 28 

Dear Diary, even more results. Mildred Dickerson and Alice Coleman are teaching in 
North Carolina; while Beck Comer, Anna Page Edwards, and Julia Fansler are teaching in 
New York. Speaking of New York, Dorothy Martin is artin' away for art's sake in her own 
little studio up there. Syd Henderson is doing the same thing in Paris. Louise Dunford is 
head of the Playground Department for Washington, D. C. Martha Franklin, Lillian Hicks, 
and Dot Needy went on a pleasure trip to Alaska and stayed. They send word that the 
spell of the Yukon got them. Modeling for an exclusive dressmaker in New York is Sarah 
Face. Maurine Gibson is dietitian at Martha Washington College. Dorothy Spencer says 
she has a wonderful job sampling all the products at a huge bakery in Charleston, W. \'a. 
And three of our high-fliers have turned aviatrix : Virginia Hallett, Hotense Poyner, and 
Lillian Holland. Katherine Francis is the matron in a girls' school in Illinois. 

March 15 

Dear Diary, the girls are getting slow. I may have to send them a second notice. Here's 
the latest: Marguerite Farrar teaching near Roanoke and spanking six daily. Guy Martin 
and Margaret Gambrill are with the Ivory Soap Co. They say it's clean business. Kathleen 
Frazier is sole owner of a hose factor}' in Winston-Salem, N. C, and in the same city Alar}' 
Sue Goode's husband runs a tobacco mill. Jean Gills is Petersburg's finest seamstress ; while 
there, too, is Thelma Frye as woman-police. She's showin' 'em ! 

The world of journalism has caught quite a number: Sarah McCue, Mary Lasley, 
Frances Land, and Virginia Fugate send word that they're writing for the New York Times. 
Lee Warren Hammer is editor of the Daily Nezvs-Record of Harrisonburg, and Geneva Getz 
and Sue Beth Hudson are working with her. Dorothy Gillie is a supervisor in a Columbia 
training school. Ann Hendricks and Mary Grove are running" a Ford place in Birmingham. 
Mary Sue Goode has Edith McCollum as her partner in a Staunton ice cream establish- 
ment. Ellen Gordon has one of the largest chicken incubators in the U. S. Hollywood has 
lured some of our old classmates too: Dot Harley, Gertrude Jones, Louise McMellon, and 
Lena Reynolds. 

April 1 

I thought it must be an April Fool today when I learned that about a dozen of those 
girls are actually teaching school ! Here they are : Elizabeth Kingsolver in Quebec, Bertha 
Halterman in Chicago, Gladys Groton in New Orleans, Melvina Hammond in Dallas, Betty 
Harris in Porto Rico, Sarah Johnson in Winchester, Martha Keller in Washington, Lena 
Joyce in Page County, Sara Jones in Oregon, Laura Humphries in Philadelphia, Thelma Kidd 
in Kansas City, and Constance MacCorkle in Los Angeles. Stella Harmon is doing Y. W. C. 
A. work in Russia. In Germany, Janet Lowrie is living with her husband. Dorothy Harris 
has a Fashion Shoppe in Denver, where Ruth Holt and her husband are conducting a huge 
sanatorium. Louise Hooks is a Blues singer on Broadway. Elsie McGee is dean of women 
at Farmville. Lucie Vellines sends word that she is marrying a man named Bean. I wonder 
if he's from Boston! Emily Harrison is selling vacuum cleaners. Louise Henderson has her 
own orchestra, and she played for V. P. I. last Easter. Barbara Steele is with her. The 
Shryock sisters are successful undertakers somewhere in Maryland. 

April 28 

I'm beginning to realize what a job I've undertaken, but a resolution's a resolution. 
Azile Schwartz is directing shows for a N. Y. company. Louise Mapp is the only model for 
her artist husband. Katherine Hinebaugh is a famous hare-back rider in a circus. Marion 



Hinebaugh is the owner of a flour mill in Minnesota. Beulah Holt's an apple grower. 
Virginia Holsinger is head of the Girl Scouts in Baltimore. Cootie Melchor is married and 
living in her dear Winston-Salem. Ruth Henshaw is raising peanuts in North Carolina. Pat 
McPherson is keeping the wolf away by her modernistic magazine covers. Louise Roark 
is a beauty specialist in partnership with Mary Morgan, barber, in Cleveland, Ohio. Frances 
Maloy publishes a monthly pamphlet on "Clothes and How to Make Them." Myrtle Manby 
owns the largest shoe store in Norfolk, and Fanny Masengill is head of the Shoe-Shiners' 
Organization of that city. Virginia Orange is at present posing for a famous sculptor in a 
piece of work to be called "The Dreamer." Socks Pcttitt is costume designer for Metro- 
Galdwyn-Mayer. Get over that ! 

Ma\ 30 

Dearest Diary. I haven't written lately but have lots of information. Lib Tudor has 
traced her ancestors back to English royalty and is living in one of the old Tudor castles. 
Prudence Spooner and Babs Stratton studied radio and are both working on the Rockefeller 
project. Skeeter Stephenson succeeded Ruth St. Denis, and is quite as famous. She has 
under her Louise Neal and Louise Shoemaker. Hazel and Christine Marshall went into an 
ice business together. Clyde Ramsey has turned genius and is a composer of songs. And 
Fleanor Moore is in opera in Germany. Virginia Richards is writing a thesis on "Why 
Women Cannot Keep Secrets," and Elva Mason one on "Weaknesses of Man" in order to 
get her M. A. at Columbia. Katherine Pierce writes for the American Magazine each 
month about "Foods and How to Prepare Them." Audrey Miles is on her honeymoon in 
Switzerland. Minnie May is investigating the causes of volcanic eruptions in Italy. Nelle 
Matthews is matron at Shenandoah College. Jane Miller is married and living in Seattle, 
Washington. 

June 29 

I've just come back from Betty's wedding and found so many letters. These girls are 
actually teaching! Lulu Miller in Alexandria, Margaret Rucker in Buchanan, Virginia New- 
man in Broadway, Lucy Robinson in Philadelphia, Edna Palmer in San Francisco, Gladys 
Ogden in Roanoke, Rosa Lee Ott in Harrisonburg, Gladys Myers in Yonkers, N. Y., Sallie 
Richardson in Miami, Harriet Powell in Boston, and Lula Mitchell in Staunton. Margaret 
Frances West writes that she is conducting "round-the-world" tours for progressive teachers. 
With her are Rosa Owen, Edna Palmer, Ella Mae Mossburg, Mildred Tate, Nelle Taylor, 
Evelyn Stultz, and dear Mrs. Saunders. They will come back, she says, and enlighten the 
world on various subjects. Margaret Tate is teaching music in Big Stone Gap. Martha 
Surlier is president of a bank in Clifton Forge. Emma Jane Shultz has gone back to Nature 
and is living with her husband in the Rockies Ethel Townsend, Loraine Wise, Barbara Via, 
Eloise Thompson, Lila Wyatt, Lillian Yancey, and Blanche Williams are at Columbia, striv- 
ing toward an M. A. Piercy Williams is married and living in Danville. Margaret Taylor 
is running a dry-cleaning establishment in Waynesboro. Tommie Thompson has a dog-and- 
cat hospital at Winchester, and Jessie Wright is raising thorough-bred horses near her. 
Margaret Woodroof and Lillie Tucker are selling washing-machines and making money. 
Ruth Weddle is proprietor of a restaurant in Richmond. Kathleen Snapp is studying archi- 
tecture at the I', of Ya. Katherine Shenk is a life-saver at Palm Beach. Jo Wooding ami 
Charlotte Shaw are running a hot-dog stand at Coney Island. Margaret Shepherd is very 
successful in making Swiss watches. Joyce Showalter has become a gypsy and gone to 
France with an old tribe. 1 envy her. Diary. 

July 2(1 

I'm almost finished, and I'll have the rest of this year to play, as I said. I heard from 
Louise Watkins today. She's raising cows and chickens and running a country school. 
Mary Lois Turner is teaching in Lynchburg, and so is Mary Wiley. The other Margaret 
West has turned poet, and is almost famous. Lois VanPelt has concocted a cream for that 
college-girl complexion, which she says is bringing a goodly income. Sue Wire is a telephone 
operator in New York, and Alice Underwood a telegraph operator. Oh, here's another teach- 
ing school! Gladys Wilson in Charleston, West Ya. Jo Wyatt is married and living in her 
home town. She says she's settled down and happy. And Louise Wyatt says since she was 
jilted in love she is a sworn old maid. I don't believe her, though. Mildred Weadon is 
running a tourists' home in New Market. 

There, that's all. — Oh, wait — here's Zehmer's picture! 1 haven't mentioned her. I just 
thought everyone would know what she is, for she's the first lady in the state, Diary, wife 
of the governor. I always knew Zehmer'd amount to something. 

There, my resolution is fulfilled. Me? There's nothing, except I haven't grown up 
yet — and shan't ! 

— Sarah Dutrow 




Scram bi.ed Sophomores 






Freshman Class 





Dr. H. A. Converse 
Honorary Member 



\l iss Lui u Coi 
Big Sister 



MOTTO 
"At the foothills, climbing. 



COLORS 
Red and White 




FLOWER 
Poppy 



Janet Rebecca Hanson, Mascot 



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WATK IN S 
VICE -PRESIDENT 



C L.O E 
PRESIDENT 

FRESHMAN 
OFFICERS 




SIMPSON 

5 E CR E TARY 





EURE 
BUSINESS MANAGER 




WILLIAMS 
TREASURER 



CARMINES 

5ERGEANT-AT- ARMS 



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High School Freshmen 



READING LEFT TO RIGHT 

First Row — Josephine Hedinger, Inez Brown, Mary Shankle, Frances Whitman, 
Marietta Melson, Eleanor Wilkins, Hilda Hisey, Vivien Hobbs 

Second Row — Elizabeth Maddox, Mildred Garland, Pauline Farrar, Hazel Wood, 
Zillah Haley, Marjorie Lutz, Lillian Lambert, Jessie Grimes 

Third Row — Virginia Carmines, Angerona Aydlette, Frances Sweeney, Ruth 
Behrens, Josephine Minnick, Adonna Hibbert, Kathleen Bussey, Sarah 
Richeson 

Fourth Row — Virginia Greenwood, Virginia Somers, Margaret James, Man- 
Smith, Louise Tate, Mary Sue Hammersly, Ann Moore 

Fifth Row — Virginia Saunders, Margaret Fielder, Augusta Bishop, Marx- 
Spit; er, Nora Lyttle, Anna Belle Kilgore. 




Home Economics Freshmen 



READING LEFT TO EIGHT 



First Row — Alma Ruth Beazley, Mary Agnes Mason, Frances Reynolds, 
Imogene Whittington, Elizabeth Sugden, Martha Frances Bailey, Rebecca 
Bennett 

Second Row — Margaret Ellen Walker, Margaret Fry, Ada Collins, Edna Brooks, 
Virginia Ruby, Mildred Neal 

Third Row — Wilma Tucker, Lottie Ransone, Elizabeth Brown, Lena Early, 
Judith Hardy, Isabel Custis, Alice Webb 

Fourth Row — Rachel Sanders, Louisa Williamson, Kathryn Thomas, Virginia 
Turner, Anna Leigh Hawthorne, Louise Stickley, Marion Mackenzie 







Grammar Grade Freshmen 



READING LEFT TO RIGHT 

First Row — Virginia Garrette, Dorothy Shrum, Margaret Cooper, Madge Hel- 
dreth, Elizabeth Rawls, Gladys Garth, Thelma Leech, Gladys Julian. Lucille 
Crews, Christine Chittum 

Second Row — Frances LaNeave, Marie Day. Edith Buchanan, Lula Black, Hazel 
Kline, Margaret Mears, Martha Goodwin, Florence Talley 

Third Row — Emily Fugate, Elizabeth Corey, I.atisha Inge, Christine Clarke. 
Lois Bradshaw, Mary Cloe, Thyra Arlington, Emma Carr, Josie Gammon 

Fourth Row— Martha Wright, Julia Evans, Isabel Battenfield, Ruby Bishop. 
Edith Haden, Virginia Dorset, Grace Butler, Frances Houser, Elizabeth 
Houser 

Fifth Row — Gladys Ogline, Susie Massie, Norma Wilson, Irene Morris, Eva 
Campbell, Thelma Adams, Man- Lavvson, Katherine Mart/., Anne Rebecca 
Sanford, Olga Burtner, Mildred Lewis, Elizabeth Wilkinson. Nancy Marino 

Sixth Row — Mattie Phipps, Myrtle Estes. Virgie McFarland, Nellie Wright, 
Mae Thurston, Helen Turpin, Lera Bowman, Eloise Burton, Lucy Chappell 




Primary-Kindergarten Freshmen 



READING LEFT TO RIGHT 

First Row — Elizabeth Morgan, Gladys Farraf, Margaret Eure, Louise Thweatt, 
Anne Salmond, Sarah Frances Gayle, Virginia Goodrick, Mary Alice Wade, 
Augusta Baker 

Second Row — Ethel Obenshain. Eleanor Baker, Elise Meelheim, Ida May Glee- 
son, Emily Camper, Mildred Wright, Elizabeth Craig, Mary Helms, Dorothy 
Rollins, Lucy Hubbard, Eunice Meeks 

Third Row — Lois Stuart, Dorothy Williams. Courtney Dickinson, Mary Louise 
Griffith, Kathryn Brown, Ethel Argenbright, Karene Dryden, Jane Miller, 
Hazel Bazzarre 

Fourth Row — Dorothy Fox, Margaret Smith, Elizabeth Warren, Lucille Tovce, 
Iola Stickley, Georgia Cline 



April Ecstasy 



'Twas April caught me on the wing, 

And both together leaped to meet the blue 

That drew in circle crests of hills. 

Dawn-kissed and bathed in opalescent dew. 

'Twas April laughing at the moon ; 

Together we did span the star-strewn way 
And scattered perfumed ecstasy 

Upon the sloping green for waking day. 

— Garnet L. Hamrick 



The China Teacup 

Translucent, fragile, delicate, and rare, 

By a true artist cast into its mold, 
Reflecting sensitively his own heart — 

It was a thing of beauty to behold. 

It fell one day from the high, protected shelf. 

Its shell-like exquisiteness rudely shattered : 
The fragments were slowly, tenderly upgathered, 

As if the falling had not mattered. 

— Martha Boaz 



roems 

By Frances Snyder 

REMEMBRANCE 

1 did not mind the loneliness, 

Nor weep that you had gone ; 

I felt quite self-sufficient, 

My life went on — and on. 

I hit one day in the autumn 

A single scarlet leaf 
Smiled like you in passing. 

And then — I knew my grief. 



COMPLETENESS 

Sing-Fu's revenge 
Was not to slay 
Her, but day 

On day to watch the girl 
Grow old and grav. 



RAIN 

I have walked in thy rain, O (iod. 

And praised thee for its sweetness in the spring. 

I have galloped with thy thunder steeds, 

And known quiet nights under dripping eaves. 

Today I have walked — yet bewildered 

I come — Father, what is this terrible thing 

In my heart thv rains cannot reach? 







ShIKLI \ ELIZABE1 II \l ILi.l.k 

Student Council 

MOTTO 
"Democracy is sonic/hint/ deeper than liberty; it is responsibility." 

OFFICERS 

Sn iklky Elizabeth Miller President 

Beulah Virginia Thomas Vice-President 

Annie Mae Brown Secretary and Treasurer 

Sarah Emma Louise Face Recorder of Points 

PLEDGE 
I, having a clear understanding of the basis and spirit of the honor system, whereby our 
college life is governed, pledge myself to uphold the regulations of Student Government, to 
maintain in every way the highest standard of personal honor, and to accept my responsibility 
for helping others to live up to the high standard. 







STUDENT 
COUNCIL 




THOMAS 



RICHARDS 



FACE 




Nellie Morgan Cowan 



Y. W. C. A. 

OFFICERS 1930-'31 
Nellie Cowan President 

Jeannette [ngle Vice-President 

Jane Campbell Secretary 

Mary Fari n holt Treasurer 

ADVISORY COUNCIL 
Miss Lulu E. Coe Miss Grace Palmer 

Miss Myrtle Wilson Dr. \Y. J. Gifford 

Dr. H. G. Pickett 




Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 



READING LEFT TO RIGHT 

First Row — Nellie Cowan 

Second Row — Grace Blalock, Jane Campbell 

Third Row — Virginia Stark, Verice Stephenson 

Fourth Row — Florene Collins, Frances Matthews 

Fifth Row — Alice Elam, Louise Harwell 

Sixth Row — Teannette Ingle, Lois Winston, Mary Farinholt, 

Dorothy Rodes, Margaret Beck 



PLEDGE 

I unite in the desire to realize full and creative life through a growing knowl- 
edge. I determine to have a part in making this life possible for all people. In 
this task I seek to understand Tesus and follow Him. 



OFFICERS FOR 1931-'32 

Pauline Efford President 

Louise Harwell J "ice-President 

Bessie Grinnan Secretary 

Lucie Vellines Treasurer 




MATTHEWS 

VICE - PRES 10 ENT 







TROTT' 

PRESIDENT 

KAT1 




ELAM 

SECRETARY 




GILLIAM 



GORE 



So let us search and find the truth in life in order to show it unto others, that they 

may live more fully. 





HAMRICK 



KATT 



HURST 



WINSTON WRENN 





Honorary Members — Miss Katherine M. Anthony, Miss Julia Robertson, Mr. Samuel P. Duke 

Counselor — Dr. Walter J. Gifford 











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The purpose of this organization is to foster literary interest and attainment and to 
encourage creative writing. 







Thf 



Cross Float 



The Red Cross 



Ever since the need was felt for student participation in the work of the 
National Red Cross, there has been a fine sense of cooperation on our campus. 
In recent years this enthusiasm has been organized into a working committee 
under the supervision of the chairman of the Rockingham County Chapter. The 
committee, with a student at its head and a member of the faculty acting as an 
adviser, has been successful in securing definite contributions from a large ma- 
jority of the students and faculty of the college. 

The campus drive opened this fall with an assembly program presenting the 
local as well as the national need for financial aid. For one week the work was 
pushed energetically forward by willing and generous hands. The drive was 
brought to a close with the construction of a most significant and attractive float 
for the Armistice Day parade. 



Anne R. Tkott 



Nellie Cowan 
Sallie Bishop Tones 



COMMITTEE 



Chairman 

Assistan I Chairmen 



Lillian Arthur 
Elizabeth Bush 
Mary Cloe 
Sue Glover 



Jeannette Ingle 
Janet Keenan 
Sarah McCue 



Dorothy Rhodes 
Margaret Ruckek 
Emma Jane Shultz 
Florence Stephenson 



Miss Julia Robertson Faculty Adviser 




VHERRETT ■>■ 
-MB PRESIDENT 

D.CKERSON SPOONER ; ■•' NEEDY QUICK 

BUSINESS MANAGER VICE-PRESIDENT SECRETARY TREASURER 



DRAMATIC 




NEWBILL 



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Cast of "The Heart oe Paddy Whack" 
Stratford Costume Play 



Stratford Dramatic Club 



DIRECTOR 

Miss Hudson 



HONORARY MEMBER 
Mr. Logan 



Since 1919, when the Stratford Literary Society became the Stratford Dra- 
matic Club, it has been customary to give each fall a modern play and later a 
costume play, and often another program, sometimes consisting of three one-act 
plays. During these years the Stratfords have produced a variety of dramas, three 
hundred and thirty characters having been cast. 




Blue-Stone Orchestra 

READING LEFT TO RIGHT 

Bowers, Dr. Pickett, Twyford, Melchor, Hobson (at piano), Finkelstein, Krouse, Orange,. 
Air. Harmon, Marino, Harmon, Miss Hosmer 

DIRECTOR 

Mr. Harmon 

OFFICERS 
Sara Ellen Bowers President 

Barbara Steele Vice-President 

Laura Melchor Secretary-Treasurer 

Jenny Lind Hockman Business Manager 

HONORARY MEMBERS 

Miss Hosmer Miss Hoffman 

Mr. Shorts Dr. Pickett 

The Orchestra is growing steadily and is doing its part in meeting the musical 
needs of the college. 








TAYLOR 

PRESIDENT 



DEBATING CLUB 



SECRETARY 




BURNETJE 



THOMPSON 



BUSINESS MGR.-TRE^UBER 




BRADHAM 




BROWN 





STOVER 




SWARTZ 





TROTT WRENN 



WHITMAN 



Honorary Members — Mr. Dingledine, Mr. Mcllwraitr 
Coach — Miss Boehmer 




BONES 




u 



fir -j 

WICK COFFMAN 

PRESIDENT SECRETARY-TREASURER 

AEOLIAN 
CLUB 






DOWNEY MOORE ,E 






MILLER 





HARLIN HAMRICK 



Honorary Member — Miss Margaret Hoffman 
Other Members — Dorothy Cornell, Lois Funkhouser, Louise Hobson, Sarah Ellen Bowers 



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GLEE CLUB ^ / 

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Glee Club 






COLORS 


FLOWER 




Rainbow Tints 


Wild Rose 




DIRECTOR 






Miss Edna Siiaeffer 






HONORARY MEMBERS 






Miss Gladys Michaels Miss Frances Houck 


Miss Evelyn Wolfe 



READING LEFT TO RIGHT, OPPOSITE PAGE 

"irst Row— Beck, President; Harley, Vice-President; Stephenson, Secretary, 
Business Manager; Pearson, Treasurer 

Second Row — Bowers, Bush, Cassell, Cowan, Downey 

Third Row — Eubank, Eure, Face, Grinnan, Hamrick 

Fourth Row — Harlin, Lawson, McGhee, Mapp, Meeks 

Fifth Row — Miller, Moore, Oakes, Ott, Ralston 

Sixth Row — Tate, Vellines, Watkins, Watt, Wick 



Hurst, 



There was a glee club in the school from the first session, which took part in 
occasional college exercises, and in 1915 it was more definitely organized. This 
organization was the first college glee club in Virginia to affiliate with the Federa- 
tion of Music Clubs. It serves as a college choir and frequently gives programs 
and sacred concerts in the college and in the churches of the community. Public 
performances off campus include exchange programs with the University of Vir- 
ginia, Richmond University, and Mary Baldwin College ; appearances at Wash- 
ington and Lee University, Virginia Polytechnic Institute, and Randolph-Macon 
College ; concerts in the high schools of Winchester, Clarendon, Roanoke, Rich- 
mond, Petersburg, Norfolk, Hampton, Newport News, Leesburg, Mt. Jackson, 
and elsewhere ; church programs in Roanoke, Norfolk, and Portsmouth; participa- 
tion in state contests and choral festivals, broadcast programs, and appearances 
before the General Assembly of Virginia, the Thursday Morning Music Club of 
Roanoke, the State Rotary Convention at Lynchburg, Apple Blossom Festivals in 
Winchester, and various community organizations of Harrisonburg. 






LAND 



SCHWARTZ 



MELCHOR 



CHORAL CLUB OFFICERS 






WRIGHT 



WILSON, G 



PERRYMAN 



Choral Club 

OFFICERS 



AZILK SCHWARZ 



.President 



Frances Land ] 'iee-Presidenl 



Laura Melchor 



Secretary 



[f.ssik Wright Treasure, 



Gladys Wilson . 



. Business Manager 



Pauline Perryman Librarian 



The Choral Club was organized for the purpose of encouraging chorus sing- 
ing. The club sponsored a county contest in this branch of music last year and 
assisted in a county and district contest this year. 





Choral Club 






ARTHUR. LILLIAN 




ROLLEY, WINNIE 




BALDWIN, CAROLINE 




RICHESON, SARAH 




I1EAZLEV, ALMA R. 




RUSH, HELEN 




BAYLOR, MINNIE 




ROOP, VIRGINIA 




BLANTON, HENRIETTA 




RHODES, DOROTHY 




BRADHAM. MARIAN- 




SALMON!), ANNE 




BROWN, INEZ 




SANFORD, ANNE REBECCA 




BROOKS, EDNA 




SAUNDERS, VIRGINIA 




BEERY, REBECCA TOD!) 




SANDERS, RACHEL 




BUTTS, KATHRYN 




SCHWARZ, AZILE 




KERR, ELIZABETH 


HUDGINS, GEORGIA 


SHAUN, JANIE 




CARSON, ELIZABETH 


JONES, VIRGINIA 


SHRUM, DOROTHY 




CHADWICK, ANNE 


KELLAR, MARTHA 


SHOEMAKER, LOUISE 




CHAPPELL, LUCY 


KEENAN, JANET 


SHEPHERD, MARGARET 




CLOE, MARY 


KINGSOLVER, ELIZABETH 


SMITH, MARGARET 




CLINE, GEORGIA 


LACKEY, MARGARET 


SIMPSON, MILDRED 




COOPER, MARGARET 


LAND, FRANCES 


SOMERS, GWYN 




COMER, REBECCA 


LEECH, THELMA 


SOMERS, VIRGINIA 




DAMERON, BEATRICE 


LEMMON, SARAH 


SPENCER, DELMA 




DICKERSON, MILDRED 


LEWIS, MILDRED 
LOVETT, ETHEL 
MANBY, MYRTLE 
MATTON, ELIZABETH 


SPENCER, DOROTHY 




DICKINSON, COURTNEY 


MELCHOR, LAURA 


SPITZER, MARY 




DORSET, VIRGINIA 


McCOMB, LOUISE 


SYKES, EVELYN 




DRY'DEN, KARENE 


MOORE, ANN 


THOMAS, ELIZABETH 




EARLY, LENA 


MOORE, ELIZABETH 


THOMPSON, ELOISE 




ESTES, MY'RTLE 


MORGAN, MARY 


TINSMAN, ELSIE 




FEREBEE, GRACE 


MYERS, ELIZABETH 


TUCKER, LILLIE 




FRY, MARGARET 


NEBLETT, FRANCES 


TURPIN, HELEN 




FUNK, KITTY 


OGLINE, GLADYS 


VIA, BARBARA 




FAULS, ESTELLE 


PAYNE, SARAH 


WADE, MARY - ALICE 




GAYLE, SARA FRANCES 


PERRY'MAN, PAULINE 


WARREN, ELIZABETH 




GARTH, GLADYS 


RAMSEY, DOROTHY' 


WEST, MARGARET 




GOODRICH, VIRGINIA LEE 




WHITMAN, FRANCES 




GRESHAM, DOROTHY' 




WILSON, GLADYS 




GRIFFITH, MARY 




WILLIAMS, DOROTHY 




HANSBARGER, MARGARET 




WILKINSON, ELIZABETH 




HARDY, JULIA 




WOOD, CLARICE 




HARDY, NATHALIE 




WRIGHT, NELLIE 




HARRIS, DOROTHY 




WOODROOF, MARGARET 




HAUSER, ELIZABETH 




WRIGHT, JESSIE 




HOLTER, MARY 




WILLIAMS, GRACE 













Si 




BELL 

VICE- PRESIDENT 




HOLLAN D 

TREASU RER 




DALGETY KERR 

PRESIDENT 




MARKHAM 

BUSINESS MANAGER 







MAPP 

S ECRE^A R 




FA R I N H O LT 

5ER.6E.ANt M- NR.M5 



Blue-Stone Cotillion Club 



COLORS 
Orchid ami ( rold 



MOTTO 
'Conic and trip it as ye go 
On the light fantastic toe.' 



HONORARY MEMBERS 

Miss Helen Marbut Miss Miriam Faries 

Dr. H. A. Converse 



READING LEFT TO RII'.HT, OPPOSITE PAGE 

First Row — Bard, Rosa Bell, Bones, Brothers, Coleman, Cowan 

SECOND Row — Coyner, Cromwell, 1 lickerson, Efford, Emory, Eubank, Face 

Third Row — Haga, Hallett, Harley, Hicks, Hockman, Hooks, Hurst 

Fourth Row — Ingle, Johnston, tva Lou Jones, Sallie Bishop Jones 

Fifth Row — Masengill, Melson, Needy, Irma Orange, Virginia Orange, Pearson, Pointc 

Sixth Row — Purdum, Roach, Rolston, Sanders, Stark, Strailman, Stratton 

Seventh Row — Thomas, Turner, Watkins, Watt, Williams, Wilson, Zehmer 





H 





CI COTILLION "^ 
■ CLUB 







i 






►•-... 







WRENN 



ROACH 



ELLISON CHILDS 



HOWELL 



Breeze Staff 

EDITORIAL BOARD 
Frances Snyder Editor-in-Chief 

Betty Bush Assistant Editor 

Catherine Howell Assistant Editor 

Christobel Childs Literary Editor 

Sadie Finkelstein Column Editor 

Virginia Strailman Joke Editor 

Sarah Dutrow Feature Editor 

Helen McNeely Campus Editor 

Martha Boaz Poetry Editor 

Gertrude Rust Society Editor 

Eleanor Wrenn Alumna Editor 

Jaouelyn Johnston News Editor 

Ida Roach Athletic Editor 

Janet Lowrie Exchange Editor 

Frances Land .Mechanics Editor 

BOARD OF MANAGERS 

Elizabeth Oakes Business Manager 

Audrey Cassell Assistant Business Manager 

Emilyn Peterson Assistant Business Manager 

Margaret Campbell Assistant Business Manager 

REPORTERS 

Blanche Schuler Sarah Lemmon 

Virginia Ruby Virginia Jones 

Lelia Kearney Gladys Farrar 

Martha Ellison Mildred Henderson 



TYPISTS 




Hazel Bazzarre 


Ethel Town send 


Virginia Dorset 


Audrey Miles 


Lucy Ritenour 


Dorothy Gresham 


The Breeze, a four-page student newspaper 


is issued every week, and gives 


the varied activities of student life. 











GILLIAM 





MOORE 



BUSINESS MANAGE.P. 



SCHOOLMAN STAFF 



MARKHAM 

ASSISTANT C-OITOR 





EURE 




5TFUILMAN 




GRIMM 



ROBERSON 




ASSISTANT BUSINESS 
MAN AG £R 




NEWBILL 




ELLISON 



schoolma'am 

ART COMMITTEE 




HENDERSON M 



M c PHERSON 



COLLINS 



FACULTY ADVISERS 

Miss Cleveland Miss Palmer 

Miss Aiken Miss Boje 

Miss Maebut Me. Logan 

The Editor wishes to acknowledge the invaluable assistance given by Dorothy 
Gresham, Audrey Miles, Winnie Roller, Hortense Poyner, Janet Lowrie, Christo- 
bel Childs, Anne Trott, Frances Snyder, Dr. Pickett, and Dr. Normand in putting 
out the 1931 issue of the Schoolma'am. 




RALSTON 
PRESIDENT 



VICE-PRESIDENT 




COLLINS 
SECRETARY 




BECK 
TREASURER 



Art Club 

MOTTO 
. Irs Gratia . Irtis' 



COLORS 

lack and Gold 



FLOWER 

lack-eved Susan 



Miss Aiken 



HONORARY MEMBERS 
Dr. Pickett 



Miss Palmer 



The Art Club was organized with the purpose of giving those students most 
interested and talented in art a chance to do some definite and worth-while work- 
in that field. 

Tlie work has proved most interesting in the painting of stage scenery, mak- 
ing of posters and floats, and assisting in decorations for various activities. Fur- 
thermore, several splendid programs have been presented this year. The club 
feels it has done something most desirable in bringing a higher standard of the 
artistic to the College. 





K BROWN 

CLUB 




CARMINES 




RODES 



SURBER 



WINSTON ^ZIMMERMAN 



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Alpha Literary Society 



READING LEFT TO RIGHT 

First Row — Augusta Bishop, Alma Ruth Beazley, Agnes Mason, Mary Shankle, Margaret 
Cooper, Dura Eubank, Imogene Whittington, Zillah Hailcy. Thyra Arrington, Virginia 
Saunders 

Second Row — Gladys Ogline, Inez Broun, Hattic Gibson, Gwyn Somers, Mary Sue 
Hamersley, Marjorie Lutz, Catherine Minnick, Isabel Custis 

Third Row — Margaret Walker, Margaret Fry, Nathalie Hardy, Louise Watkins, Mary 
Spitzer, Mildred Wright, Elizabeth Craig, Thelma Adams 

Fourth Row — Margaret Hansbarger, Gladys Garth, Pauline Farrar, Elizabeth Burner, Louise 
Tate, Hazel Wood, Mary Helms, Hilda Hisey 

Fifth Row — Isabel Battenfield, Lena Early. Catherine Martz, Elizabeth Wilkinson, Ruth 
Behrens, Harriet Powell, Lois Bradshaw, Mildred Garland, Karene Dryden, Jane Miller, 
Lucille Joyce, Marie Day, Hazel Bazzarre, Rebecca Sanford 

Sixth Row — Lillian Flippo, Elizabeth Biller, Elizabeth Coney, Gladys Ogden, Virginia 
Somers, Rowena Briel, Frances Pence, Helen Turpin, Elsie Meelheim, Eunice Meeks, 
Virginia Turner 



OFFICERS 
Harriet Pearsox President 

Martha Warren Secretary-Treasurer 



Alpha Literary Society 



MOTTO 
'En avant!" 



COLORS FLOWER 

Blue and White Sweet Pea 



HONORARY MEMBER 
Mrs. Ruebush 



• The Alpha Literary Society was organized in 1924 to give 
every girl in college an opportunity to be a part of some or- 
ganization in order that she might train for better service and 
for more effective leadership in the literary world. 

The secondary aim of the society is to train girls for member- 
ship in the other literary societies on the campus and to help 
these societies to find girls most interested in literary work. 

The society is organized in small groups, each group choosing 
the work they wish to study. Various phases of literature were 
thus studied in these different sections this year. 







Lanier Literary Society 



READING LEFT TO RIGHT 

First Row — Margaret Payne, Rosa Bell, Mary Coyner, Dorothy Rodes, Pauline Carmines, 

Frances Matthews, Rehecca Leatherbury, Pauline Efford 

Second Row — Helen Wick, Virginia Strailman, Jean Gills, Mary Cloe, Jeanette Gore 

Third Row — Louise Hooks, Eva Holland, Fan Bell, Irma Orange, Prudence Spooner 

Fourth Row — Louise Neal, Louise Mapp, Louise Thweatt, Louise Harwell, Yirgelia Turner, 

Mary Farinholt, Jeannette Ingle 

Fifth Row — Catherine Bard, Virginia Stark, Jenny Lind Hockman, Anne Salmond, Linda 

Sanders, Ida Roach, Maxine Pointer, Virginia Eubank 

Sixth Row — Dorothy Harley, Evelyn Sykes 

OFFICERS 

Fall Winter Spring 

President Eva Holland Pauline Efford Maxine Pointer 

/ 'ice-President Frances Bell Linda Sanders Mary Coyner 

Secretary Yirgelia Turner Rebecca Leatherbury Virginia Strailman 

treasurer Louise Hooks Louise Hooks Louise Hooks 

Sergeant-at-Arms Rosa Bell Louise Mapp Helen Wick 

Critic Louise Harwell Maxine Pointer Eva Holland 

Chairman Program Com. . .Dorothy Rodes Prudence Spooner Pauline Carmines 



Lanier Literary Society 

MOTTO 

"His song zvas only living aloud, 
I lis work a singing with his hand. 



COLORS FLOWER 

Violet and White Violet 



HONORARY MEMBER 
Miss Elizabeth Cleveland 



The Lanier Literary Society was one of the first to be or- 
ganized upon the campus. It was founded on October 8, 1909, 
and named in honor of Sidney Lanier, the well-loved Southern 
poet. 

The Laniers in former years emphasized the study of poetry 
since their ideal, Sidney Lanier, was a poet. However, this 
year they have spent two quarters studying the modern novel and 
have devoted only one to the study of poetry. In thus broaden- 
ing their field they are true to their aim of progressiveness and 
purpose. 




Lee Literary Society 

READING LEFT TO RIGHT 

First Row— Verice Stephenson, Nellie Cowan, Ruth Watt, Madeline Newbill, Mildred Simp- 
son, Virginia Boggs, Frances McGhee 
Second Row — Mary Watt. Piercy Williams. Janet Keenan, Dorothy Rhodes, Delphine Hurst. 

Florence Dickerson 
Thirh Row — Virginia Gilliam, Katye Wray Brown, Florence Stephenson, Elspeth Peyton, 

Dorothy Williams, Kitty Bowen, Georgia Collins 
Fourth Row — Lena Bones, Julia Duke, Nancy Trott, Martha Franklin, Margaret Beck, 

Lillian Hicks. Kitty Wherrett 
Last Row: Evelyn Wilson, Frcellc Reade, Anna Lyons Sullivan, Jaquelyn Johnston 



OFFICERS 
Fall Winter Spring 

President Kitty Bowen Marie Burnette Marie Burnette 

Vice-President Julia Duke Lena Bones Elspeth Peyton 

Secretary Ercelle Reade Florence Stephenson Janet Keenan 

treasurer Verice Stephenson Verict Stephenson Verice Stephenson 

Sergeant-at-. Inns Olive Roberson Mary Hyde Lena Bones 

Critic Mary Hyde Martha Franklin Kitty Bowen 

Chairman Program Com. . .Lillian Hicks Julia Dike Ruth Watt 



Lee Literary Society 

MOTTO 
Wearing the white flower of a blameless life" 



COLORS FLOWER 

Gold and Grey White Carnation 



HONORARY MEMBER 
Dr. John W. Wayland 



When the very foundations of the college were being laid and 
the elemental policies and traditions being born, the Lee Literary 
Society was- organized, and since then has lived and grown with 
the college. The name of Robert Edward Lee was chosen as the 
embodiment of everything fine and worthy of being an example 
for those in the society. 

Since their establishment, the Lees have aspired to uphold the 
standards set by the founders. This year they have made inter- 
esting studies of modern poetry, short stories, and drama. They 
have presented a costumed program for the Ashby Chapter of the 
Daughters of the Confederacy in memory of their namesake, 
Lee. 







Page Literary Society 

READING LEFT TO RIGHT 

First Row — Sarah Dutrow, Margaret Eure, Gladys Farrar, Frances Snyder, Gertrude Blake, 

Lois Winston, Elizabeth Oakes, Jane Campbell 
Second Row — Margaret Moore, Laura Melchor, Maxine Karnes, Elizabeth Moore, Sarah 

Ellen Bowers, Martha Ellison 
Third Row — Lucie Yellines, Virginia Richards, Margaret Campbell, Rebecca Emory, Louise 

Henderson, Mildred Henderson 
Fourth Row — Elizabeth Bush. Florene Collins, Mae Brown, Sally Face, Harriet Ullrich, 

Emilyn Peterson 
Fifth Row — Alice Flam, Grace Blalock, Martha Warren, Virginia Ruby, Elizabeth Warren, 

Hortense Poyner, Janet Lowrie 



OFFICERS 

Fall 

President Catherine Howell 

Vice-President Rebecca Emory 

Secretary Lucie Vellines 

Treasurer Mildred Henderson 

Sergeant-at-Arms Elizabeth Oakes 

Chairman Program Com. . .Marguerite Smithev 
Critic Harriet Ullrich 



Winter 
Harriet Ullrich 
Maxine Karnes 
Martha Ellison 
Florene Collins 
Elizabeth Bl'sh 
Sarah Dutrow 



Spring 
Virginia Thomas 
Virginia Richards 
Emma J. Shultz 
Virginia Ruby 
Elizabeth Oakes 
Lucie Vellines 



Elizabeth Oakes Frances Snyder 



Page Literary Society 

MOTTO 

'77n' Country's, thv Cod's, and Truth's" 



COLORS FLOWER 

Red and White Red Rose 



HONORARY MEMBER 
Miss Margaret Vance Hoffman 



The Page Literary Society, named in honor of Thomas Nelson 
Page, has endeavored to live up to those ideals which he gave 
in suggesting the motto quoted above. By celebrating Page day 
on his birthday, April 23, and presenting programs about him, 
it keeps alive the appreciation for that great Southern author. 
This year, programs for the first quarter were based on a study 
of the modern magazine ; for the second quarter, on poets who are 
universally loved ; and for the third quarter, on poets who are 
also musicians. 




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Le Cercle Francais 

READING LEFT TO RIGHT 

First Row — Jane Campbell, Margaret Campbell, Stella Harmon, Luis Drewry, Martha 

Ellison, Prudence Spooner, Hilda Hisey 
Second Row — Vesta Landes, Anna Belle Kilgore, Hazel Wood, Mary Swartz, Jean Gills, 

Eva Holland 
Third Row — Elizabeth Thomas, Frances Neblett, Vivien Turner, Lola Davis, Jeannette Ingle 

LA DEVISE 
"Si la jeunesse savait; si la vieiilesse pouvait!" 

LES COULEURS LA SAINTE PATRONNE LA FLEUR 

Le Drapeau Tricolore Jeanne d'Arc Fleur-de-lis 

LE MEMBRE HONORAIRE 
Mademoiselle Elizabeth Cleveland 

LES OFFICIERS 
Eleanor Wrenn President 

Mary Swartz I 'ice-President 

Janet Lowrie Secretary 

Lois Drewry Treasurer 

Emma Jane Shultz Chairman Program Committee 

Le Cercle Francais aims to set a high standard of excellence in French. It 
serves to acquaint its members with the customs and traditions ot France, as well 
as with the language. 




Euclid Club 

READING LEFT TO RIGHT 

First Row — Margaret Hansbarger, Mary Shankle, Alice Elam, Sallie McCormick, Margaret 

Payne, Elizabeth Coney 

Second Row — Gladys Garth, Lillie Frances Blankenbaker, Louise Watkins, Maria Tate 

Third Row — Gladys Myers, Virginia Somers, Elizabeth Jones, Virginia Coffman, Catherine 

Minnick, Alary Ann Nichols 

MOTTO 

"There is no royal road to mathematics." 

HONORARY MEMBER 
I >r. Henry A. Converse 

OFFICERS 

Fall Winter Spring 

President Lillie F. Blankenbaker Lillie F. Blankenbaker Virginia Coffman 

Vice-President Virginia Coffman Virginia Coffman Virginia Somers 

Secretary Mary Ann Nichols Gladys Myers Mary Shankle 

Treasurer Elizabeth Jones Margaret Hansbarger Eloise Burton 

Chairman Program Com. Margaret Payne Rachel Rogers Mary Ann Nichols 

The Euclid Club was organized to stimulate interest in mathematics. Its 
members study those phases of the subject not taken up in class. 


















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High School Club 

READING LEFT TO RIGHT 

First Row — Sally McCormick, Margaret James, Mary Shankle, Marietta Melson, Linda 

Sanders, Margaret Payne, Ziela Hailey 
Second Row — Mary Smith, Elizabeth Burner, Martha Ellison, Eleanor Wilkins, Marjorie Lutz 
Third Row — Pauline Farrar, Margaret Tate, Ruth Behrens, Hazel Wood, Mildred Garland 
Fourth Row — Frances Pence, Edith McGuire, Inez Brown, Mary Sue Hammersley, Catherine 

Minnick, Lucy Coyner 
Fifth Row — Virginia Somers, Vivian Holihs, Frances Neblett 

MOTTO 

"Don't stare up the steps, but step up the stairs." 

COLORS FLOWER 

Blue and White Forget-me-not 

HONORARY MEMBER 
Dr. J. W. Uaylaxd 

OFFICERS 

Linda Sanders President 

Margaret Payne J 'ice-President 

Georgia Collins Secretary 

Negebie Ellis Treasurer 

Martha Ellison Chairman Program Committee 



> 

















Frances Sale Club 



READING LEFT TO RIGHT 

First Row — Alma Ruth Beazley, Agnes Mason, Mary Ellen Sanford, Mary Coyner, Pauline 

Carmines, Jeanette Gore, Mary Watt, Gertrude Blake, Catherine Twyford 
Second Row — Margaret Walker, Margaret Fry, Evelyn Click, Dorothy Rodes, Frances 

Matthews, Lois Winston, Gwyn Somers 
Third Row — Mary Holter, Nathalie Hardy, Virginia Richards, Florence Stephenson, Hattie 

Gibson, Lillian Hicks, Martha Franklin 
Fourth Row— Maxine Pointer, Catherine Francis, Marian Bradham, Rebecca Leatherbury, 

Julia Cosby, Frances Maloy, Nell Coyner 
Fifth Row— Virginia Gilliam, Elizabeth Rhoades, Irma Orange, Helen Smith 

MOTTO 
"Give to the world the best you have, and the best will come back to von." 
COLORS FLOWER 

Lavender, Pink, and White Sweet Pea 

HONORARY MEMBER 

Miss Julia Robertson 

OFFICERS 

Frances Matthews President 

Jeanette Gore Vice-President 

Martha Franklin Secretary 

Lillian Hicks Treasurer 

Gertrude Blake Scrgeant-at-Arms 







Alumnae 4-H Club 

First Row, Left to Right — Gaye Phillippi, Agnes Mason, Evelyn Click, Imogene Whitting- 
ton, Isabel Custis, Ida May Gleason, Eleanor Baker 

Last Row, Left to Right — Margaret Goodman, Mildred Weadon, Mary Holter, Nathalie 

Hardy, Lena Early, Judith Hardy 

MOTTO 

"To make the best better." 

COLORS 

Green and White 

OFFICERS 

Isabel Custis President 

Mildred Weadon I 'iee-Presideitt 

Evelyn Click Secretary 

Gaye Phillippi Treasurer 

Lena Early Song and Cheer Leader 

The Alumnae 4-H Club was organized to give to the students on the campus a 
knowledge of 4-H Club work as it is carried on in rural communities. 



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Day Students Club 

READING LEFT TO RIGHT 

First Row — Lola Davis, Priscilla Harmon, Ethel Argenhright, Virginia Holsinger, Virginia 

Earman, Kathryn Shenk 

Second Row — Josephine Sullivan, Lera Bowman, Vada Steele, Vesta Landes, Janie Shaver 

Third Row — Ethel Hollar, Ruth Western, Mary Spitzer, Mary Shaver 

Fourth Row — Virginia Sanger, Catherine Wampler, Dortha Cline 

Fifth Row — Alice Bolton, Camilla Dovel 

MOTTO 

"Grasp the opportunity." 

COLORS FLOWER 

Yellow and White Daisy 

HONORARY MEMBER 

Mr. Shorts 

OFFICERS 

Alice Boltox President 

Gladys Myers I 'ice-President 

Vesta Landes Secretary-Treasurer 

Lola Davis Business Manager 









Danish Gymnastics 




FTER two days of Danish gymnastics I can fully appreciate all 

the trials and tribulations through which the biologist passed in 

finding out how many muscles the human body possesses. I 

have become quite a staunch upholder of his numbers. In fact. 

I believed I had discovered a few more, but alas, so has the rest 

of the class by now ! 

Muscles have been a sore point with me for quite a while. After much 

thinking and meditation I am on the verge, as soon as I can bend my knees, of 

praying for rubber muscles. Thev would be much more elastic in the long run. 

I have been told that our present exercises originated for the poor, plodding 
Danish peasants. No wonder they had such a pessimistic outlook upon life. 
Even my day dreams are nightmares. 

1 never believed Friday a hoodoo dav until after my emergence from gym 
class two weeks ago, with the consolation that out of sympathy and consideration 
for beginners a lenient modification of the exercises had been given us. 

So much can happen from one Friday to another that the suspense is indeed 
painful. By Thursday I can make a trans-campus flight in three minutes. By 
Saturday I manipulate a fair representation of a rabbit hop to classes. 

future generation, 1 am feeling for you. With the farsightedness of the 
experimental scientist and the Utopian dreams of a reformer, I vision our children 
clinging to poles and walking on their heads. 

1 am in a fathomless predicament. When I should be conjugating verbs, I 
am singing off commands. Even my room-mate threatens to gag me if I do not 
stop groaning in my sleep. Other people stare queerly at me when I begin jump- 
ing like a jumping jack or break into a goose step. After walking on my heels 
and stepping on my toes, my feet get so mixed up that I can never decide in which 
direction I am going. 

Nevertheless, I am quite proud of my one accomplishment, which I owe 
entirely to the Danish influence. My greatest drawback, especially at meal time, 
has been my short arms. Now I can actually hold my own at the dinner table. 

In case I emerge victorious over these Fridays. I am considering very 
seriously joining a circus this summer, as a human contortionist. However, from 
my present feelings, after two more Fridays I shall be in excellent trim for a 
reclining vacation. 

— Hilda Hisey 



Athletic Council 



OFFICERS 
Mary Watt President 

Lena Bones / 'ice-President 

( Ilive Roberson Secretary 

Mary Haga Treasurer 

Kitty Wherrett Business Manager 



MEMBERS 

Mary Haga Basketball Sport Leader 

Martha Warren Baseball Sport Leader 

Frances Ralston Hockey Spurt Leader 

Hortense Poyner Tennis Sport Leader 

Evelyn Wilson Swimming Sport Leader 

Wellford Smith Senior Representative 

Olive Roberson Junior Representative 

Emilyn Peterson Sophomore Representative 

Virginia Sterne Freshman Representative 



COLLEGE CHEER LEADERS 
Sally Face Laura Melchor Virginia Carmines 




R O BERSON 




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WARREN 




ROLSTON 

ATH LETI C 
COUNCIL 






COYNER, L. SULLIVAN 








STERNE i MELCHOR 

FACE CARMINES.V. 



POYNER 




PETERSON 








Hockey Varsity 



READING LEFT TO RIGHT 

Kitty Wherrett (Manager), Virginia Stark, Julia Duke, Evelyn Wilson, Mary 

Watt (Captain), Marion Cicerale. Mary Haga, Anna Lyons Sullivan, 

Mary Farinholt, Lena Bones, Martha Warren, Ercelle Reade, 

Kitty Bowen, Jaquelvn Johnston 










Chi \o 
Hockey Mascot 



Hockey 

The Virginia Hockey Tournament at William and Mary, November 1, 
opened the hockey season for Harrisonburg. The colleges which sent their entire 
teams to participate in the tournament were Sweet Briar, William and Mary, 
Westhampton, Farmville, and Harrisonburg. Hollins, Randolph-Macon, and 
George Washington sent several players. Four Harrisonburg girls — Mary 
Frances Rolston, Mary Katherine Bowen, Mary Farinholt, and Mary Watt — were 
picked from the student teams to play against an exhibition team which was com- 
posed of picked players from Philadelphia and Baltimore hockey clubs. The 
second game was with Westhampton, November 8, and the result was 4 to 3 in 
favor of Westhampton. Harrisonburg's next game was played with William and 
Mary on the home field. Harrisonburg won with a score of 3 to 2. The season 
closed with a game played against the Alumna; on November 29. This game 
added another victory for this year's varsity with the score of 3 to 2. Mary Watt, 
captain of this year's varsity, is to be succeeded by Katherine Bowen. 

LINE-UP 
Mary Haga Center Forward 

Martha Warren, Marion Cicerale Right Inside 

Mary Watt ( Captain ) Left Inside 

Katherine Bowen Right Wing 

Evelyn Wilson, Jaquelyn Johnston Left Wing 

Frances Rolston Center Halfback 

Mary Farinholt Left Halfback 

Anna Lyons Sullivan Right Halfback 

Lena Bones Right Fullback 

Julia Duke ' Left Fullback 

Mary Hyde, Virginia Stark Goal Keeper 




Sometime During the Westhampton Game 







Basketball Varsity 



READING LEFT TO RIGHT 



First Row — Mary Farinholt, Nell Coyner, Anna Lyons Sullivan (Captain), 

Lena Bones, Lucy Coyner 

Second Row — Frances Neblett. Julia Duke, Sue Leith, Jaquelyn ((ilmston, 

Kitty Wherrett (Manager) 



Basketball 



THE SEASON 
The 1931 basketball season for Harrisonburg Teachers College began by 
winning from the Alumnae with a score 21-10. Harrisonburg's second game was 
played with Farmville, in which the former was defeated for the first time in 
three years, by a score of 27 to 19. Westhampton came to Harrisonburg for the 
third game, and was defeated by the Harrisonburg team with a score of 42-27. 
The season was ended by a game with Lebanon Teachers College with a score of 
53 to 25 in our favor. Anna Lyons Sullivan, captain of this year's team, is to be 
succeeded by Mary Farinholt. 

LINE-UP 

Anna Lyons Sullivan (Captain) Forward 

Nell Coyner Forward 

Lena Bones Forward 

Jaquelyn Johnston Forward 

Frances Neblett Center 

Sue Leith Center 

Frances Rolston Center 

Mary Farinholt Guard 

Julia Duke Guard 

Lucy Coyner Guard 




Seeing the Team Off 




Swi 



wimming 

A visit to the swimming pool, at any time from September to June, discovers 
ample proof of its popularity. The swimming meets, with their various stunts — 
gotten up by the several classes — and contests, the life-saving examinations, and 
the annual visits of Captain Carr make this sport rank high in importance. There 
are classes for beginners and also for advanced swimmers, each having its respec- 
tive meets and contests. 
















T 



ennis 




Tennis is no new sport at the college, but began with the first year of the 
school. The Pinquet and Racquet clubs were organized in 1909, and held their 

first tournament in 1911. Class tennis 
took the place of these clubs in 1927, and 
varsity tennis came into being in 1928. 

Our courts have been in demand 
all spring. The main feature of tennis 
this season was the ladder contest, which 
was greeted enthusiastically by all the 
tennis lovers. This contest seemed to be 
quite a drawing card in interesting the 
beginners in the game. 




Golf 



Golf is steadily gaining in popularity 
on the campus, and the nine-hole course 
is a favorite resort. It is not only a fasci- 
nating sport, but the very thing to pep 
one up after the day's work. Those who 
are beginners are taught in a special class 
and thus given a good opportunity for 
learning the game. 

Not only the students, but also many 
of the faculty find that a great deal of 
spare time can profitably be spent on the 
links.. 



Class Hockey and Basketball Competition 

More enthusiasm than ever before was shown in class games 
this year. The classes arranged inter-class games. The sched- 
ules and scores for hockey were as follows: 



Seniors vs. Juniors 0-4 

Seniors vs. Sophomores 1-2 

Seniors vs. Freshmen 4-0 

Juniors vs. Sophomores 0-0 

Juniors vs. Freshmen 7-1 

Sophomores vs. Freshmen 3-0 

The following inter-class basketball games were played : 

Sophomores vs. Freshmen 37-30 

Juniors vs. Freshmen 40-24 

Seniors vs. Juniors 4-49 

Seniors vs. Sophomores 22-43 

Seniors vs. Freshmen 27 25 

Sophomores vs. [uniors 13 47 

The Juniors were the champions of the season 




MARY GRACE WATT 
Best-All-Round 




HARRIET ATKINSON PEARSON 
Best Looking 




SHIRLEY ELIZABETH MILLER 
Most Dependable 



\~S\J 







JEANNETTE CUTTLE INGLE 
Most Friendly 




VIRGINIA RUFFIN GILLIAM 
Most Okic.inal 




ANNE RADFORD TROTT 
Most Intellectual 




LENA BONES 
Most Athletic 







HELEN SHELTON McNEELY 
Most Artistic 





VIRGINIA LEE STRAILMAN 
Best Dancer 




ALMA DONALENE HARVEY 
Most Dramatic 




SHIRLEY ELIZABETH MILLER 
Most Musical 




EMMA VIRGINIA ZEHMER 
Wittiest 





MILLER CICERALE THOMAS 

BEST ALL ROUND-MOST FRIENDLY MOST ATHLETIC -WITTIEST MOST DRAMATIC-BEST DANCER 

UNDERSTUDIES 





HURST TROTT 

MOST INTELLECTUAL M OST DEPEN DAB LE 




H 



BOWERS 

MOST MUSICAL 



COLLINS 

MOST ARTI5T1C 




STARK 

SEST LOOKING 




DUTROW 

MOST ORIGINAL 


































Supers 






Best-All-Round 




Most Intellectual 




Catherine Wherrett 




Catherine Markham 




Most Athletic 








Franc es Rolston 










Most Dramatic 




Most Musical 




Anne Trott 




Sadie Finkelstein 






Most Friendly 








Lois Winston 






Best Looking 




Most Original 




Grace Dalgety-Kerr 


Wittiest 

Louise Wine 


Frances Snyder 




Most Artistic 




Best Dancer 




Sue Glover 




Catherine Markham 








The College Year-Play 



ACT I 



•$aS. 



First Episode— SEPTEMBER 



SCENI - 

22 — "Special" train arrived, bringing tin- various 
actors in mi!" college play — old girls and new 
girls; confused, puzzled, timid girls; happy, 
laughing, experienced girls. The new college 
year-play began ! 

2A — The- college offered the first entertainment of 
the year — a movie, which both old girls and new 
girls eagerly attended. 

2b — The new girls were welcomed by our faculty, 
the directors of our college year-play, at a re- 
ception at Hillcrest. 

28 — No new girl could lie homesick this first Sunday. 
Why? The group leaders and new girls had a 
grand out-of-door supper on the golf course — 
sang songs ami became better acquainted. 



- 



Second Episode— OCTOBE R 

Scenes 

2 — Today each college girl enjoyed a social given by her church. 

3 — For the seniors it was a day of importance. Taking their last step toward seniority, thej 
received their class privileges. For all it was an evening of enjoyment. The Y. W. C. A. 
gave another delightful party to the whole student body. 
4 — In thai ever-exciting yearly match-game of basketball between new girls and old girls, 

the News baffled the Olds to the tune of 29 to 29— a tie ! 
8 — The colorful, flowery, happy Old Girl-New Girl Wedding took place as a symbol of the 

uniting of these two groups on our campus into one harmonious student body. 
9 — The Y. W. C. A. Candlelight Service also was most impressive and inspiring, serving to 
strengthen our vows of faith, loyalty, and friendship to our college and our classmates. 

1(1 — The juniors now must feel their importance, too, as class privileges were granted them 
The faculty had some tun in the form of a picnic supper at the college camp. 

11 — Disraeli emerged from history books and lived before us in a most enjoyable motion 
picture, sponsored by the Art Club. 

13-1-1 — As usual around the first part of each quarter, the so-called "goats," or new society 
members, made their bow to the campus. 

17 — The Cotillion Club gave a dance for the entertainment of the freshmen. A Mardi Gras 
scene was effected nuite successfully with gala decorations and a galaxy of costumes. 

18 — Worthwhile movies on the campus are always welcomed. The Choral Club was respon- 
sible for the motion picture on this evening. 

21 — The old girls, dressed in white, renewed the Student Government pledge. In an atmos- 
phere of seriousness, solemnity, and candle-light, each girl could but realize her respon- 
sibility as a member of the student body. 

30 — At the Virginia Hockey Tournament at William and Mary the "four Marys" of our 
varsity hockey squad were honored, being chosen to play in an exhibition game against 
the Southeasterners from Philadelphia. 



Third Episode— NOVEM BER 



Scenes. 



-Witches, elves, goblins, and all types of weird creatures emerged from their habitations 
to indulge in dancing, stunts, and cider with ginger snaps. Who was responsible for all 
this gaiety? None other than the Athletic Association. 










m 


*b 






1 i 


* - 


\ 


1 1 



5 — The junior officers entertained the newly-elected freshman oflicers this evening in the 
tea-room. 
6 — A most unusual attraction was offered in the 
first Lyceum program of the year, when the 
English Singers made their appearance at the 
college. 
8 — In a hard-fought hockey game, Harrisonburg 
lost to Westhampton. But with the good old 
H. T. C. spirit all went to the Cotillion Club 
party and had a fine time. 

11 — The entire student body in uniform white cos- 
tumes, followed by a unique Red Cross float, 
marched in Armistice 1 lay parade. Forgetting 
the long walk and their weariness, all enjoyed to 
the utmost the grand picnic supper at the col- 
lege camp and the thrill of riding thither in the 
new busses. 

12 — Again our Lyceum tickets were used. The Jitney Pla 
oughly enjoyed. 

13 — The Editor-in-Chief, Business Manager, and Assistant Editor of the Schoolma'am, and 
Editor-in-Chief and Business Manager of the Breeze left tonight for William and Mary 
to attend the Virginia Intercollegiate Press Association Convention. 

IS — Tempest was gladly received on our campus. Strange? No. 'Cause it was a movie 
starring John Barrymore and sponsored by the Debating Club. 

17 — On a muddy field and in the pouring rain, a most exciting hockey game between Har- 
risonburg and William and Mary was played. Harrisonburg was victorious, the score 
ending 3 to 2. 

21 — Jackson Hall's "open-house" party reminded all 
that Thanksgiving was approaching. There were 
stunts, dancing, cider, and ginger snaps. 



The Duenna were thor- 




22 — Another mov 



Thanks to the Frances Sale 



Club! Enjoyed? Of course! 

26-27 — Why all the excitement ? Wednesday and 
Thursday — Thanksgiving Holidays! "Nuf" said! 

29 — A full day! Alumna? defeated by our varsity in 
hockey. Y. W. C. A. received students and 
alumnae at tea. Hard-earned and well-deserved 
emblems and certificates were awarded at hockey 
banquet in Blue-Stone Dining Room. The senior 
class gave the day a fitting climax by taking us 
all "Half Way to" Heaven." 



Fourth Episode— DECEMBER 



Scenes 

2 — Isn't it a fine idea? Miss Boehmer and Miss Coe had the first of their series of teas 

for the student body today. 
3 — Thanks to Dr. Wayland ! We can enjoy and learn the events of history at the same time 

from his historical movies. 
5— The Stratford Dramatic Club presented Babs. And wasn't Babs adorable, good, 'n' 

everything nice? 
8 — Christmas was coming ! See all the students now as happy, laughing children bringing 
toys to the dining room to place under the Christmas tree. The Y. W. C. A. sponsored 
this ; the toys are to be used for mission purposes. 
1() — All were dressed in pretty, light evening dresses to go to the formal Christmas dinner, 

which is always a real event. 
12 — Senior Class Day arrived, with all its dignity — and frivolity too. The purple and white 
and the cap and gown prevailed everywhere. And everything that was expected was 
seen In the Dead of Night, the class play. 
13 — The Schoolma'am celebrated its yearly bazaar by turning the Little Gym into an inter- 
national market place. 'Twas a festal occasion, with stunts, dancing, music, refresh- 
ments. Everyone came, bought, and frolicked! 
14 — This was a Sunday afternoon and evening impressed upon our memories by the Glee 
Club vesper services and the Y. W. C. A. Christmas carols. 



IS — The Y. W. C. A. Christmas pageant, with a Madonna selected from the student body, 
was most impressive, bringing to us as it did the spiritual side of Christmas. Christmas 
parties ! What an atmosphere of gaiety surrounded all the dormitories between nine and 
ten o'clock, and how everyone entered into the Christmas spirit! 

19 — Christmas Holidays marked the end of the first act of our college year-play. The hust- 
ling and hurrying of the gleeful girls to board the "Special" made a fitting finale. The 
train went! The curtain descended! 



ACT II 
First Episode— JANUARY 

SCENl S 

5 — The "special" train arrived, bringing back all the players to begin the second act. The 

holidays were over ! 
7 — Professor Macchioro of the University of Naples, delivered the address at convoca ion 

exercises for the second quarter. 
9 — Again the Athletic Association offered some diversion for the student body. This time, 

a movie ! 
1-1 — Miss Boehmer and Miss Coe entertained girls again at a pretty tea. 
10 — Juniors beat freshmen and sophomores beat seniors in exciting sister-class basketball 

games. 
17 — Everyone fell in and enjoyed "The Big Pond," a movie sponsored by the junior class. 
18 — The Y. W. C. A. welcomed the new girls of the second quarter at a breakfast in the 

tea-room. 
23 — A beautiful new school song, written by one of the students, was sung by the Glee Club 

in Chapel. 
2-1 — Everyone went and liked "Sarah and Son," a movie presented by the Stratford Dramatic 

Club. 
31 — The Breeze blew "The Beloved Rogue" to our campus. Yes, it was a movie! 



Second Episode— FEBRUARY 



Scenes 

1 — This afternoon the Page Literary Society was in charge of the tea. 

I' — Why all that laughter? It was due to the grand, hilarious Alumnae Minstrels, presented 

this evening. 
7 — The .Eolian Club gave a most attractive bridge party. 

12 — The Stratford Dramatic Club presented two one- 
act plays in celebration of 1 )rama Week. 
13 — The faculty was entertained by the Stratford 

Dramatic Club at a delightful Valentine tea. 
1-1 — The Alumna?-Yarsity basketball game is always 
an occasion of importance. We won this time, 
21 to 10. 
19 — Big election day! Polls were crowded. Con- 
gratulations to new officers ! 
28 — The annual college dance, sponsored by the Blue- 
Stone Cotillion Club, was a huge success. Plan- 
ned and anticipated for weeks before, it was 
remembered and talked about for weeks after. 




Third Episode— MARCH 



SCENK> 

6 — Basketball team played Westhampton and Farmville. All Sophomores today were 

"High-Minded." Why? 'Twas their day. 
7 — The Schoolma'am sponsored a movie, "The Taming of the Shrew." 



10 — Second election day ! This one completed all voting by the entire student body for this 

year. 
1-1 — Harrisonburg basketball team defeated Lebanon team, from Pennsylvania. After the 

game, everyone went to an attractive alumna; bridge party. 
15 — We were very glad today to see so many newly planted trees to beautify our campus. 
16-17 — Examinations brought the close of the second act of our college year-play. 
18 — The curtain descended on the banquet given to the Dining-room Scholarship Girls. 



ACT III 



Third Episode— MARCH (continued) 



y ^^^F^^^^\ 



20- 



21- 



SCENES 

19 — The juniors took their first step toward seniority when their class rings were bestowed 
with a most impressive ring ceremony. The Glee Club went to Mary Baldwin College 
to present a program. 

-Miss Cleveland presented to the student body two Indian 
rugs and a picture donated by Blue-Stone Hill's first daugh- 
ter, E. Beatrice Marable, for Founders' Day. The Athletic 
Association gave a peppy musical comedy, "Jerry of Jericho 
Road." 
iift""— "i '»e* "- 1 — Dr. Sa whill's beautifully illustrated lecture on Venice was 

^^^fSryiTiJlL. sponsored by the Scribblers. 

^^j/jpffctfijl^b 23 — Harrisonburg lost a debate with Farmville here. Captain 

^^* T ! *lL I Vi Carr arrived for the annual life-saving tests. 

W XjjjSESI ^5 — Life-saving tests were given. 

JWBI 27 — Harrisonburg lost a debate with Radford here, but lost with 

^fjgiUfli that true H. T. C spirit and enjoyed afterwards the Glee 

^^^^"^<jk Club bridge party. 

28 — The Choral Club had a stunt contest, with dancing after- 
wards. The impersonation of Miss Lyons won the prize 
for the sophomore class. 
30 — The new Student Government officers were installed, each 
person present realizing her responsibility more fully because 
of the inspiring message of Miss Adele Clark. There was 
a formal banquet that evening, and the new and old Student 
Government officers received the entire student body, danced, and drank punch. 'Twas 
a day to be remembered. 



Fourth Episode— APRIL 

Scenes 

2 — The Y. VY. C. A. Installation Service was lovely in all its impressiveness, calmness, and 

beauty. 
3-4-5-6-7 — Easter Holidays! A brief pause in Act III. 

8 — Back again ! What a lot of "action" still to perform before the end of our play in June ! 
10 — The dance given tonight by the Blue-Stone Orchestra was enjoyed by everyone. 
11— "The Heart of Paddy Whack," the Stratford 

costume play, touched the hearts of all who saw 

it. It was lovely ! 
16 — The Glee Club left today for Charlottesville to 

participate in the Virginia Music Festival. The 

Sophomore Tree Planting ceremony was, as 

usual, most impressive. 
2-1 — Slickers! Umbrellas! Raining? No. 'Tis the 

Day of the juniors, and they're letting smiles be 

their umbrellas, too. 
25 — A contest was held among the classes in the in- 
terest of better group singing. The freshmen 

entertained the juniors at the gayest, peppiest 

dance. 




Fifth Episode— MAY 



2 — Again 
4— The C 

15— The o 



Scenes 

one of lh-. Sawhill's illustrated lectures was enjoyed. 

otillion Club gave a card party. 

allege celebrated the dedication of the main administration building and the com- 

pk ti< m of the inner quadrangle of buildings on 
the campus. Governor Pollard, with ex-Gov- 
nors Byrd and Trinkle. anil many other distin- 
guished visitors were present. May Day Exer- 
cises occupied the afternoon, with the queen and 
her court in all their splendor. Richard Crooks, 
tenor, and Albert Spalding, violinist, in an eve- 
ning concert, completed a day that will always 
be outstanding in our college history. 
"The Ides of May are come" — and gone. 
22 — Freshman Day ! Where did all the little maids 
with their red-and-white sunbonnets and pails 
come from? 'Twas Freshman Day, and Har- 
rison Hall was a typical farm. 
2.i — For the first time in the history of H. T. C, the 
Senior Class sponsored a formal dance. 




JUNE 

7 — Baccalaureate sermon by Reverend M. C. McLean, D. D., pastor of College Hill Baptist 
Church, Lynchburg. 

9 — Commencement. Address to the graduates by Dr. Sidney P. Hall, Virginia Superintend- 
ent of Public Instruction. 
The "Special" left at noon ! 



The Poet 



A fool there was, 
And he lay all day 
Under the shade of a tree, 
And he wrote his thoughts 
With a grey goose quill. 
Men called him a poet 
And read his words ; 
They called him a genius, 
But all he did 
Was to lie on the hill 
And write his thoughts 
With a grey goose quill. 



-Lois Funkhouser 




Old Girl-New Girl Wedding 







X 

2 



Expressive Noses 




Some people speak of our eyes as expressing our character, of kindness shining from 
these organs or hardness glittering in them. Others tell us that the mouth is the true index 
to personality, that turned-up corners signify a happy disposition, and downward-sloping ones 
mean a gloomy frame of mind. But I speak to let you into a secret by means of which you 
may quickly and accurately catalog a person's character and disposition in your mind : 
Observe his nose. 

When you have lost at bridge and go dispiritedly to the pawnshop to say "Au revoir" 
to your only watch, you are confronted by an old, dried-up, dirty-looking Jewish bargainer 
who spreads a toothless, oily smile over you. If you go by your old standards, you will allow 
that friendly smile and those guileless eyes to convince you that your watch is worn out and 
worthless after all. But wait — follow my advice and study his nose. One can soften the 
expression of his eyes and mouth, but only a plastic surgeon can change the expression of a 
nose. Ignore his deception and observe that he has a hooked nose. This will tell you that 
he is crafty and cunning and that he really should let you have ten dollars on your watch 
instead of five. 

Just the opposite of this type is the possessor of the Grecian nose. He is slightly cold 
and reserved, but very likely to be artis f ic and beautiful himself. Did not nature give him 
a delicately beautiful nose to start with ? Fortunate is the owner of this type of olfactory 
organ, for with it goes some talent pertaining to the arts and assuring him success in this 
line. 

When you meet the Roman type of nose, look out for strong will and determination. 
This person will be fond of having his own waj r ; so if you would manage him, take this 
fact into consideration and conduct your maneuvers accordingly. You see, nose study has its 
compensation in gaining for us many useful little ideas as to how to get what we want from 
people whom we did not know how to approach formerly. 

But I fall in defeat when it comes to advising you upon the character of the unfortunate 
owner of the upturned, or pug, nose. I can only say that it is a nose of contradictions. 
According to all laws of reason, this person should be frivolous and undignified. I must 
confess that I belong to this class, so I can give you the inside information. However, it is 
a mass of confusion. Take me, for instance. All my life dignity and suavity have been my 
ideals. Greta Garbo, of all the screen actresses, has the greatest appeal for me. At times, 
I attain high levels of seriousness and think that I am about to become something worth 
while, when the force of that upturned nose asserts itself and I see something silly to laugh 
at or think of something perfectly childish to do. I am beginning to realize that I am hope- 
lessly tied down for life to bouncing from spells in which I desire to write poetry to periods 
in which a toasted chocolate sandwich and coca-cola, along with a copy of College Humor, 
satisfy all my needs, spiritual as well as physical. 

Of course, I do not mean that all people are clearly divided into these four classes. 
There is a multitude who seem to belong to no special type. These people combine the char- 
acteristics of several of the distinct molds. I do not claim that my statement holds true in 
every case, either, but it is interesting to watch how very frequently a person's nose pro- 
claims his individuality and announces what we may expect of him. This has come to be my 
most absorbing hobby when in a crowd, and I will recommend it as a delightful pastime. 

— Madaline Newbill 



^@E\ a. 




(Ehrslry S. ShultE 

Siri Kanuarg 21. 1331 

Mr was in The S< hoolma'am both father and friend. This 
book lias, for a score of years of growth, been rooted in firm con- 
fidence in bis loyalty, honesty, understanding, and taste. 

If living is measured in keen sympathy for our fellow-men, 
his life was rich indeed. 

He expected the best from us. he trusted us, he believed in us. 
His firm but gentle counsels are still with us to help and guide. 



.S^SfX^Z^ »- 



Deaths 

Norma Spiers, '23, April 7, 1930, Newport News, Vir- 
ginia 

Rebecca Elizabeth Root, '31, February 19, 1931, Johnson 
City, Tennessee 

Maybelle Campbell, '34, October 5, 1930, Harrison- 
burg, Virginia 



THERE WILL YOUR HEART BE ALSO 

I have a pretty box — once long ago 

A lovely hollow toy, but now well stored 
With precious odds and ends — a curious show. 

Today 'tis fairly bursting with its hoard 
Of priceless little things. I always go 

And visit with my cherished quaint array 
When life grows weary and too full. And so 

I find the peace that drives dull care away. 
God takes the dearest ones of those we love, 

And we in sorrow blindly walk in strife 
And find no joy. And yet that realm above 

Called Heaven holds now for us a newer life — 
For there our treasure is. When We need rest, 

Those joys will wait us. Surely God knows best. 

— Anne R. Trott 




l«e»«5' $He tastier 



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Tom Says: 



"They have their exits and their entrances, 
And each girl in her time plays many parts.' 



THE BREEZE 



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Prominent Educators Speak 
At Conference Held Here 




SlHLY planted trees 
to beautify campus 

.^Ve^ce C 



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gv^ e V(\ **■ ' HIKERS AGAIN MAKE 
*> SEMI-ANNUAL CLIMB 









AUNT ABIGAILS 

HAPPY WISDOM 



Student 

In terii eWs 

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BREEZE STAFF 
TOMASSANUTTEN GOES TO CAMP 



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l/arsiiy Hockey 
P/ayers Honored 
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HOUDAYS AN- 
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THANKSGIVING 



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The Star 




\'( >\Y was drifting softly and gently down in lazv glides, 
swooping up and then dropping easily down again, until it 
finally came to rest. Once in a while the branches of the 
trees, too heavily burdened, released their load with a sudden 
slithering sound. The forest was silent with that silence that 
only a snowstorm brings, while the whole world lies waiting 
with hushed voice. All night the big, white flakes fell, until they came farther 
and farther apart, and finally ceased. 

Dawn came, and the rising sun cast a rosy glow over a white world. In 
a tiny cabin at the edge of a little clearing two eyes slowly opened, but at the 
sight of what lay outside the window they widened swiftly and happily. 

David jumped up and ran to the window, gazing excitedly out. 

"Grandfather, look!" he exclaimed. "It snowed last night and covered 
everything!" 

The grandfather rose more slowly and walked over to David's side. 

"Oh, boy, it is beautiful, but it means that one more winter has come. We 
must make a trip down to the city today," he went on, half to himself, "before 
the heavy snows come. It is late, almost the end of December, and that means 
that we'll be snowed in late in the spring." Still talking, he walked over to the 
stove and, stirring up last night's embers, began to prepare breakfast. 

When the meal was finished, he turned to David: "Hoy, there is enough 
snow to use a sled, and 1 must go to Newman. Would you like to go too?" 

"O Grandfather, you know 1 would! I've never been there, and I'm almost 
eight years old." He ran to the old man and caught him happily by the hand. 

"Well, well," said grandfather, patting the child on the head. "I'm glad 
you like the idea so well. Now run and get ready, for it is a long journey, and 
it will be mid-afternoon before we get there." 

All day the sled glided smoothly between the forest walls, both the old 
man and the child coasting down the slopes and walking on the up-grades. 
There was no track, and they passed no sign of human habitation, but it never 
occurred to David to doubt that his grandfather knew the road. 

By four o'clock it was dark, but the glow in the sky ahead told them they 
w : ould soon reach Newman. In a moment they topped a rise, and there below 
them lay opened a casket, lined with black velvet and filled with diamonds and 
pearls. 

"See that, David?" asked the grandfather softly. The}" paused a minute 
more and then started down the slope into the fairyland. 

Nor was David disappointed in that fairyland. To him, the streets were 
not filled with slush; the people were not jostling and hurried; the glitter of 
the lights and windows was not mere tinsel. To him was not revealed the lust, 
the greed, the hatred, in the eyes of many passers-by. All the world must be 
happy because of his happiness. 



Then suddenly just before him stood a jolly-looking, white-whiskered man, 
all dressed in red. He was standing by a brick chimney. It seemed that all the 
children in the world were crowding around him, gleefully shouting and laughing. 

"Hello, there, little one!" Was he — could he be — really talking to David? 
"What do you want for Christmas?" 

The child looked around timidly for his grandfather, but he was talking to 
some man standing near. "Please, sir," ventured the boy, "I don't know." 

"Oh, come now. Don't be afraid. What do you want Santa Claus to 
bring you?' 

"Please, sir — who is Santa Claus? And what is Christmas?" 

The man's eyes widened. He reached down and picked up David, and stand- 
ing him there on the chimney, in the glare and noise and bustle of the city, told 
him the story of the Christ-child. 

When he finished, the grandfather was standing by his side. "Thank you," 
he said in a low voice. "His mother would thank you, sir, if she were living. 
Somehow, I could never tell him — after she died." Then he and David dis- 
appeared in the crowd. 

"Who is that bird?" the Santa Claus asked the man to whom the grandfather 
had been talking. 

"He lives up there in the mountains all by himself with the boy. First time 
I've ever seen the kid. Don't know why they stay up there in the backwoods. 
The old man worshipped the child's mother." 

"Well. I'll be dog-goned ! I wonder .... Say, listen ..." 

Two days later the cabin in the forest was occupied again. Life went on as 
before, except that, before the fire in the evening, after the boy was in bed and 
asleep, the old man sat and worked. Under his knife, bits of wood turned into 
Indians, soldiers, cows, horses, and dogs. 

"I have neglected Christmas these many years, and I haven't much money; 
but David's first Christmas shall be the best I can make it," he murmured. 

The fire-light flickered and gleamed through the dark cabin night after night 
until the last toy was finished. 

The day before Christmas the old man set out to find the Christmas tree, 
leaving David in the cabin to act as housekeeper and "have everything all nice 
and warm." 

The snow was deep, and snowshoes made the exercise hard. He walked 
slowly, watching for a good tree. Only a perfect one would he have ; the best was 
none too good for David. 

Here and there in the snow, tracks showed. Sometimes it was a rabbit and 
sometimes a fox, and once it \yas a big wolf. Bushes cracked stealthily now and 
then, and sudden rustlings could be heard. Once he startled some ptarmigan, and 
then saw a fox sneak off silently through the underbrush. Again a big shadow 
drifted silently overhead and then as silently was gone. Nearby he heard a sudden 
scuffle, a squeak, and all was still again. 

It was noon, and he stopped to eat his bit of lunch. Good trees were certainly 
hard to find. He started on again, thinking that he ought to be heading back soon. 
Perhaps on the other side of the next ridge he would find his tree. He walked on. 

The bare trunks of the pines made black patterns on the snow. Their 
branches loked like lace against the sky. A grey squirrel jerked his tail and ran 
up a pine tree, only to leap across into the next one. 



At last he found it. It was perfect — not too tall, not too bushy, but graceful 
and well-shaped. He cut it down and, dragging it behind him, started back to- 
ward the cabin. 

The shadows lengthened and deepened, and the sun dropped behind a peak. 
The moon grew brighter and. as the last traces of daylight faded away, rode 
serenely in the sky. She turned the forest into a mysterious place, an abode for 
departed spirits, a fit haunt for ghosts. 

From far away rose a haunting, lonely call, floating, drifting out over the still 
forest and going on and on. The rustling sounds in the undergrowth grew louder 
and more frequent. Silent feet fell into the soft snow. Sometimes even the 
bushes moved. No, they didn't; it was just the effect of the moonlight. The 
Christmas tree was taking root again — or was some big animal sitting on it to 
keep him from getting it to David? Where was David? In the cabin, of course. 
But how (lid one reach the cabin? Where was it? North, south, east, or west? 
And where was north? 

lie was lost. In spite of the many years he had lived in the forest, he was 
lost. His eyes were getting old, and the moonlight could play queer tricks. Hut 
David — what would happen to David? The old man sank to his knees in the soft, 
pure snow and lifted his eyes to heaven. 

"( ) God, hear me. I know I don't deserve to be heard, but for the sake of 
thy dear son. hear me. who ask this for one of thy little ones. I don't mind 
dying when my time has come, for I am old and have no fear of death. If this is 
my time. < > Lord. 1 bow my head in resignation. But, God, what will become of 
David ? 1 le will be alone in the wilderness. He doesn't know the way to the city, 
and no one would come up here after him. He is young, and has his life to live 
and his work to do in the world. Please, ( > God, let me live until I see that he is 
safe. Then I'll be content. You sent a star to lead the Wise Men to Bethlehem. 
Won't you send me a star to guide me to my boy?" 

As he prayed, a light shone in the sky. and a shining white star shot across 
the heaven to disappear behind a ridge. Stumbling to his feet, with a patan of joy 
in his heart and on his lips, the old man walked unsteadily toward the crest of the 
ridge. Pulling the Christmas tree behind him, he went on until he came to the 
top. There below him gleamed a tiny light, shining through a little cabin window. 
He hastened on as fast as his faltering steps would permit, and the light shone 
brighter and brighter. At last his hand was on the latch. He opened the door and 
looked straight into David's corner. The boy was asleep. Then he turned. 

There on the floor stood a tree, shining and sparkling with crystal and tinsel. 
On the floor were books, toy animals, a farmhouse, a drum, a picture of the Boy 
Jesus. Under this was a note, on which was inscribed, 

"Merry Christmas 

from 

Santa Clans" 

and then, below it, "I will be back tomorrow." 

The old man sank upon his knees, whispering. "Thank you. God," and then 
slipped quietly to the floor — his heart at rest. 

The slumbering boy smiled peacefully. They say children are dreaming of 
angels when they smile in their sleep. 

— Sarah Lemmon 










hHHD 



415 



.i* 



f ': i s. ; in* ,x t 




«,> /T 




,.: 



Wedd 



ings 

March 15, 1929 

.Miss Matilda Finley P.ell to Mr. Harold Ross Stone 
Charleston, West Virginia 



August 1, 1929 

Miss Pauline Harbine Callender to Dr. Frank Herbert Gorham 
Rockingham 

November 26, 1929 

Miss Dorothy Rebecca Cox to Mr. Charles S. Yates 
Elizabeth City, North Carolina 

November 28, 1929 

Miss Catherine Guthrie to Mr. James Loom is 

Roanoke 
Miss Mina Lowell Jordan to Mr. John Beamon Turner 
Miss Evelyn June Jordan to Mr. Henry C. Mintringham 

December 26, 1929 

Miss Alice Hale to Mr. Raymond Siirader 
York, South Carolina 



December 29, 1929 

Miss Bertha Catherine Burkholder to Mr. Paul Bender 



January 1, 1930 

Miss Louise Westervelt Elliot to Mr. Alfred Wallace Shriver 
Norfolk 



April 5, 1930 

Miss Mary Kathleen Sullivan to Mr. Arthur Dwyer 



June 1, 1930 

Miss Mary McKann Foliiard to Mr. Larry C. Greene 
Williamsburg 



June 3, 1930 

Miss Elizabeth P. Shepherd to Mr. Daniel R. Hefner 

Harrisonburg 
Miss Katherine Lapsley Sproul to Mr. Daniel Chenault Stickley 



June 11, 1930 

Miss Alene Brocker to Mr. Artley O. Hutton 
Broadway 

June 18, 1930 

Miss Eugenia Jackson Beazley to Dr. Early Tpiomas Ferrell 
Beaver Dam 



June 21, 1930 

Miss Mary Elizabeth Worsham to Mr. Paul Dovel 

Norfolk 
Miss Fannie Green Allen to Mr. Emory J. Stafford, Jr. 
Wilson, North Carolina 



June 28, 1930 

Miss Winifred Preston Tanner to Mr. Jimmy Lee Saunders 
Rocky Mount 



July 14, 1930 

Miss Frances Milton to Mr. Edwin Mackert 
Shenandoah City 



July 19, 1930 

Miss Anna Mae Reynolds to Mr. John Hollis Ripple 
Bristol, Tennessee 



August 12, 1930 

Miss Edwena Lambert to Mr. David B. Greene 
McGaheysville 



August, 1930 

Miss Eugenia Huff to Reverend Maurice Trimmer 
Roanoke 





August 14, 1930 




Miss Elva Kirkpatrick to Mr. John Garber 




Debec, New Brunswick 




August 17, 1930 




Miss Odelle Bean to Mr. Gilbert Grey Rosenberger 




August 27, 1930 




Miss (Catherine Reaguer to Mr. Andrew W. Perrow 




Washington, I >'. C. 




Miss Elzie Marie Gochenour to Mr. John Seybert Hansel 




Elkton 




September, 1930 




Miss Ruth Sullenberger to Dr. A. A. Anderson 




Harrisonburg 




October 18, 1930 




Miss Maxim: Bruce Carmean to Mr. Curtis Linwood Dozier 




Norfolk 




October 22, 1930 




Miss Virginia Broadus Wiley to Mr. Linden Shroyer 




Crozet 




December 20, 1930 




Miss Emma Wennek to Mr. Earl Downs 




Waterford 




December 2?\ 1930 




Miss Juanita Berry to Dr. Elmer Houck 




Washington, D. C. 




December 27, 1930 




Miss Margaret Powell to Mr. Hewin 




Norfolk 




February 13, 1931 




Miss Anne Elizabeth Proctor to Mr. Harland Hakington 




Baltimore, Maryland 



Notes 

NIGHT 

Dark sky, white light, 
A moon, a star — 
Things that make a night. 

SPRING 

A wind, a rain, 
A robin's song, 
A jonquil blossoming. 

FRIENDSHIP 

A word, a smile, 

A fond hand-clasp — 

A love that's left unsaid. 



-Blanche Schuler 



Futility 



My hands reached out 
And grasped a star, 
Swinging low above the hill. 
It slipped through my fingers 
And slowly fell to earth, 
Cool star dust 
That chilled my heart. . 



— Blanche Schuler 



Tnvi 



nvia 

THE CIRCLE 

1 sat fingering my cards, not knowing whether the game would ever lie resumed. Never 
would 1 play bridge with married women again. 1 could not enter into the conversation, he- 
cause I had no child who had nearly scared me to death when he swallowed a pin ; neither 
was I worried because the baby refused his orange juice. The fact that the baby's diet list 
now allowed him scraped beef did not interest me in the least. Why must women worry and 
talk so much about their children? I looked at my watch. It was five minutes past time for 
Fido's afternoon walk. — Kathkyn Firehavoh 



ECHOES 

There is a cove by the seashore, a cool, secluded cove where the waves send echoes. Tall 
pine trees, with slim, strong branches and silky winds in their leaves, stand calmly there. 
( >ne might think them guards in a giant fairyland, watching over the hall of their queen. 
Soft waves slush quietly against the sands, wind-driven waves come to the edge of the cove, 
rush back to the sea. Mostly it is cool there, with quiet echoes and rustling winds. Some- 
times seagulls scream above the water. And a fat man in overalls comes there to eat his 
lunch. — Blanche Schulf.r 



THE PERSON ACROSS THE HALL 

What a nuisance the person across the hall can be. She comes in at any hour and talks 
whether you want to talk or not. She bobs in to ask your opinion on something and then 
pays as much attention to your advice as if you'd never given it. She stops in to ask what 
time it is. to borrow your best dress or anything else she may need. Yes, there's no doubt 
about it, the person across the hall is a big nuisance. I often wish I could do away with her 
entirely. But then, whom would I talk to, ask advice of, and borrow from? 

— Ken Bird 



THE CHRYSLER TOWER 

In the early morning sunshine the man-made monument to the god "Business" gleamed 
like a medieval knight's shining spear thrust upright into the ground. Thin and tapering to 
a shining metallic point near the soft contrasting blue of the sky stood this giant of business. 
The atmosphere around seemed saturated with an air of serenity borrowed from it. One 
would not believe that inside there could be telephones that jangled and typewriters that 
clicked and a busy hurry-flurry of people taking care of millions of dollars. 

But in front of the Chrysler tower, built out of the fortune an automobile had created, 
two upstate honeymooners had hitched their horse and buggy. — Audrey Cassell 



INSPIRATION 

Taking a deep breath, the professor continued his lecture in a scholarly tone. He wasn't 
a failure after all. If his class was a source of real interest and inspiration to one person — 
just one — then he had not lived and taught in vain. At last he had discovered that one 
person. She sat near the back of the room taking notes diligently from time to time. Her 
black hair waved softly back from her forehead, and her serious brown eyes looked steadily 
at the professor when she wasn't busy writing in her notebook. There was something about 
her that told him that she was a girl w 7 ith common sense, a girl of taste and refinement, am- 
bitious and intellectual — a girl who really appreciated the influence of the ancient Greeks and 
Romans upon modern civilization. The businesslike way in which she seemed to be taking 
notes inspired him to greater eloquence. He didn't know that the words she was writing 
were addressed to a girl friend and concerned a certain cadet with blue eyes and light 
curly hair. 

— Frances Rose Wood 




The Midwinter Dance 




POP 



Comedy 

In a discussion at the table, Virginia Stark said, "No use to worry over stu- 
dent teaching; just remember the children don't know as much as you do." 
Martha Boaz asked at once, "Did you teach the ungraded section?" 

Heard at the Alumnae Minstrel: 

Mr. Hanson : I had the funniest dream last night. 1 dreamt that 1 was 
in heaven walking down the street, and I met Mr. Mcllwraith. 
Dk. Pickett: Oh, you were not in heaven. 

In a Sophomore English Class, an answer on a test paper read as follows: 
Drama originated among the ancient Greeks with the worship of the wine- 
god Dionysius, at Christmas and Easter. 

Student (to Librarian) : Have you any books on art? 
Librarian : Yes, quite a number. 

Student : My art teacher said something about two — one thick and the 
other thin. I'll take the thin one. 

Mr. Chappelear says he can't tell his wife any secrets. Not that she can't 
keep them; it's just that her friends can't. 

Speaking of absent-minded professors, Dr. Howe looked at her watch the 
other day to find out the date, and Miss Coe started out to breakfast one rainy 
morning with a whiskbroom instead of an umbrella. 

Did Mr. Duke swathe the new boxwood shrubs head-and-ears in burlap so 
that he might have an unveiling as part of the ceremony on Dedication Day? 



Nancy Trott (to Evelyn Wilson, who was pouring the last of the cream 
into her coffee) : Evelyn, is that enough cream? 
Evelyn : Yes, if nobody wants any more. 

"Ouizzie" (in dining hall Sunday ) : Take your paper bag and pass out. 
Pauline Carmines: Huh — well, 1 guess I will after I eat it. 

THE GRAMMARIAN'S ERROR 

Mrs. Orange rather slipperl up on her grammar when she named one of her 
daughters Virginia Etta Orange instead of Virginia Aidan Orange ! 

If the planting of trees and shrubbery is to continue long at its present rate, 
the students of 1935 will have to get up at six in the morning to find their way 
through the forest in time for breakfast. 




— fifc^U- f) Soujer G)a.v,£ ^v-H^To -bow — 




Ann : Can you tell me what makes the tower of Pisa lean? 
Lillian Holland: If 1 knew, I'd take some myself. — Ex. 

Under the swinging street-car strap. 
The homely co-ed stands, 
And stands, and stands, and stands, 
And stands, and stands, and stands ! — Ex. 

On May 12th. in keeping with the rest of the preparations, Joan of Arc had 
her face washed and her nails manicured. 

The Prince of Wales has lately followed our Dr. Huffman's example in golf 
by making a hole in one. 



BIOLOGICAL BLUNDERS 

All of these were answers received on various tests by Dr. Phillips and 
Dr. Howe. 

1. The Original Bonehead — "The brain is a part of the skeleton." 

2. "A gizzard is a sort of waste can." 

3. "The purpose of digestion is to get rid of waste and make room for 
food taken in." 

4. "A bud is a stem that has started to shoot." 

5. "Water rises in a stem by the pull of gravity." 

6. "The earthworm brings the rocks to the top of the soil and acts as a 
tractor to the earth." 

7. "A bud is a young shoat." 

8. "The principal food of the downy wood-pecker is wood." 

9. "Burdock fruits are distributed by humming birds." 

10. "Cocoanut fruits are distributed by insects." 

11. "A pure culture is one that is free from all bacteria organisms." 

12. "We entered the bacteria by means of a sterile needle." 



\ 



',0: 







6a7A /b6s quite 
<9%%n2iv<siy at ti.T.C. 



after 
lO.'iO'TP^'t. 








Our Presidents 
Julian A. Burruss, 1908—1919 
Samuel P. Duke, 1919— 




The Completed Quadrangle 




Academic Procession Entering Woodrow Wilson Hall 



Dedicatory Exercises: Woodrow Wilson Hall 

The Honorable E. Lee Trinkle, 
Chairman of the Virginia State Hoard of Education. Presiding 

Processionai Grand March from A'ida ( Verdi ) 

Invocation The Reverend Benjamin F. Wilson, D. D. 

Hymn Praise to God, Immortal Praise 

Greetings from the Commonwealth of Virginia 

Governor fohn Garland Pollard 

Greetings from the Shenandoah Valley 

The Honorable Harry Flood Byrd 

Uhi Wings of Song (Mendelssohn) 
S " xi;s l!V "> * After (Clough-Leighter) 

7 o . lima Mater 

The Contribution of the College to Virginia 

President Julian A. Burruss, of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute 

A Look Forward 

President Samuel P. Duke, of the Harrisonburg State Teachers College 

Woodrow Wilson and Education in the United States 

Dr. William E. Dodd, of the University of Chicago 

Greetings from Other Colleges 

Song by the Audience Old Virginia ( Wayland-Ruebush ) 

Benediction The Reverend Benjamin F. Wilson, D. I). 

Choral Response 

Music by tin- College Orchestra 




Group of Distinguished Guests 

On Steps of Woodrow Wilson Hall Immediately after the Dedication Exercises 

READING LEFT TO RIGHT 

Front Row — President S. P. Duke ; Governor Pollard ; Mrs. Woodrow Wilson ; Honorable 
E. Lee Tiinkle, President State Board of Education; Honorable Harry Flood Byrd; 
Senator George B. Keezell ; Senator N. B. Early; Dr. Julian A. Burruss; Senator George 
N. Conrad 

Second Row — Superintendent H. B. Hanger; Delegate C. C. Lauderback ; Professor Roude- 
bush, Marshall College, West Virginia ; President White, Shepherd College State Normal 
School, West Virginia ; President M. P. Shawkey, Marshall College ; Doctor Del Manzo, 
Columbia University; President J. S. Bonar, West Liberty College, West Virginia; Dr. 
William E. Dodd, University of Chicago; Mrs. E. Lee Trinkle ; Delegate W. Stuart 
MofFett ; Dr. M'Ledge Moffett, Radford State Teachers College ; Delegate E. B. Jones ; 
Senator Joseph S. Denny; Honorable John Paul; Delegate Nehemiah Kelly 






May Day Festival 

PART I — The Coming of May 

Night Beethoven 

Night creeps in with reluctant feet. 

Dancers: Catherine Wherrett, Ercelle Reade, Elizabeth Plank, Elizabeth Carson, 

Margaret Smith 

I lance of the Gnomes Gounod 

Mir.ions of Night toiling, playing, toiling — 

1 lancers : M. Warren, E. Peterson, K. Bird. W. Smith, J. 1 Hike. S. Dutrow, B. 

Bowden, M. Hyde, E. Peyton, C. Mark-ham, 1). Harvey 

1 lawn and I lay Chopin, Delibes 

Bluslnng banners in the sky. 

Daring invaders of Night's tenting-ground — 

Dancers: A. L. Sullivan, E. Wilson, M. Farinholt, 1. Roach, M. Burnette, J. 

Johnston, M. Henderson, L. Kearney 

Country Dance Arr. by Cecil Sharp 

To the May-pole hie, 
And trip it up and down — 

Dancers: H. Shaver, S. Lemmon, R. Hardy, K. Funk, F. Neblett, H. Farrar, 
M. Melson, Y. Hobbs, E. Wilkins, E. Fugate, A. Baker, D. Williams, A. Davies, 
E. Carson, B. Shank, K. Brown, M. Griffith, L. Thweatt, M. Thurston, R. Crews, 
J. Taylor, A. Sifford, I. Battenfield, L. Arthur, S. Payne, L. Owen, M. Foskey, 
E. Maddox, V. Carmines, M. James, M. Lutz, J. Hedinger, M. Hopkins, A. Kay, 
R. Rogers, V. Somers, K. Bussey, M. Shankle, K. Butts, M. Adams, A. Day, 
O Burton, E. Wilkinson, P. Perryman, L, Hangar, C. W east, L. Ransone, A. 
Moore, M. Walker 

PART II — Interpretation of an Ancient Legend 
On May-eve the fires in all Ireland and Wales are extinguished, to be relighted on 
May-day from Beletein, or fire of the rock. This fire is to welcome back the Sun after his 
long pilgrimage in the frosts and darkness of Winter. After sacrifices are offered, Aillil, 
Queen of the May and High Priestess of the Altar Fire, rekindles the flame by her magic 
power. 

Procession of Priests (Gaelic words) Brvn Mawr Lantern Song 

Glee Club 

Greeting to the Sun Old Irish Tune 

Glee Club 

'Tis May, May-day, we're gathered here 
To welcome from his travels afar 
The glorious Sun. 

O Sun, O Sun, bringer of light and joy, 

In praise of thy radiant face so rare 

We sing to thee. 

Thy golden beams waken all life from sleep; 

F.ach bud that blooms, each springing shoot, 

Acclaims thy power. 

Each bud that blooms, each springing shoot. 

Acclaims thy power. 

So now we dance, we dance to thee, 

O radiant Sun ! 

Sun Dance Schubert Waltzes 

Dancers: F. Reade, W. Smith, S. Dutrow, E. Peterson, K. Bird, J. Duke, M. 
Warren, I. Roach, M. Hyde, E. Peyton, M. Campbell, B. Bowden, A. L. Sullivan. 
M. Farinholt. E. Wilson, M. Burnette, J. Johnston, D. Harvey. L. Kearney, M. 

Henderson 

Song 

Glee ( lub 



And now our Queen comes from her sacred bower, 

Our Queen and Priestess beautiful, 

The fair Aillil. 

Aillil, Aillil, fairest in all the land, 

The chosen one of gods and men 

O fair Aillil. 

Her lovely face full of radiance, 

So luminous with purity and wisdom rare ; 

All graceful things of word and thought 

The gods have brought ; 

The greatest gifts that can be given 

Beauty and power. 

Aillil, Aillil waits to light the fire. 
And those who would her guardians be 
Must prove their worth. 
A valiant band, bravest of all the brave, 
To guard the honor of the Queen 
Throughout the year. 

To arms, to arms, gather all warriors bold — 

All men of might and chivalry, 

Forth to the fray. 

To arms, to arms, with clashing swords and shining steel. 

And those who conquer in this fight 

Shall serve the Queen. 

Warriors' Dance Sclmbcrl 

Dancers: K. Bird, C. Wherrett, S. Dutrow, E. Reade, J. Duke, E. Peterson, W. 
Smith, M. Warren, M. Hyde, E. Peyton, I. Roach, M. Campbell, B. Borden, A. L. 
Sullivan, M. Farinholt, E. Wilson, M. Burnette, J. Johnston, D. Harvey, L. 
Kearney, M. Henderson, H. Whitehead, L. Coyner, L. Bones 

Queen's Procession Verdi 

Trumpeters : Louise Neal, Anne Salmond 
Crown-Bearer : Grace Ferebee 

Sacrifice Dance . . -. Gounod 

Dancers: C. W'herrett, E. Reade, K. Bird. E. Wilson, J. Johnston, M. Henderson 

Song Old Irish Tune 

Glee Club 
In all the land fires are burning low, 
But soon they will be kindled anew, 
Flame of this flame. 

O Queen, O Queen, light our sacred fire. 
Our fire whose warmth brings plenty and peace. 
O Light our fire. 

O flame, O flame, from heaven you came, 
To heaven arise. 

O fire divine, from heaven you came, 
To heaven arise ! 

Fire Dance 11'agner 

Dancers: A. L. Sullivan, M. Warren, M. Hyde, E. Peterson, M. Farinholt, 
S. Dutrow, I. Roach, J. Duke, E. Peyton, M. Burnette, L. Kearney, W. Smith 

Recessional Mendelssohn 

COMMITTEES 

Director Miss Helen Marbut 

Managers Mary Watt, Anna Lyons Sullivan 

Costumes Miss Alimae Aiken, Mrs. A. R. Blackwell, Pauline Carmines, Mary Watt 

Dances Physical Education Majors 

Pianist Sadie Finkelstein 

Stage Miss Grace Palmer, Anna Lyons Sullivan 

Chief Usher Frances Matthews 

Faculty Advisers.... Mrs. Johnston, Miss Miriam Faries, Miss Helen Marbut, Miss 

Alimae Aiken, Miss Grace Palmer, Miss Edna Shaeffer, Mrs. 

Blackwell, Dr. H. G. Pickett, Dr. C. E. Normand 




Grace Dalgety-Kerr, Queeen of the May 
Mary Grace Watt, Maid of Honor 




Queen and Court 



READING LEFT TO RIGHT 



Evelyn Sykes, Frances Rolston, Harriet Ullrich, Harriet Pearson, Dorothy Harley, 

Mary Cloe, Anne Salmond (trumpeter), Grace Dalgety-Kerr (queen), Mary 

Watt (maid of honor), Grace Ferebee (crown-bearer), Virginia Thomas, 

Guy Martin, Louise Neal (trumpeter), Delphine Hurst, Virginia 

Stark, Margaret Beck, Virginia Haiku 



The Day's Program 

May 15 



10:00 A. M. Preliminary Music Schubert's Unfinished Symphony 

Woodrow Wilson Hall 



10 :30 A. M. Dedicatory Exercises Woodrow Wilson Hall 



1 :30 P. M. Luncheon to Special Guests Senior Dining Hall 



4:00 P. M. May Day Exercises Over the Hil 



6:30 P. M. Kiwanis-Rotary Dinner Senior Dining Hall 



8:30 P. M. Concert | ^ rt S P aldi *g> ™ li »"< 

Richard Crooks, tenor 

Woodrow Wilson Hall 









Commencement Program, 1931 




Saturday, Jink Sixth 




9:30 A. M. 


— Annual Meeting Alumna' Association Ilunuuc I lull 




2:30 P. M.- 


6:30 P. M. — Visit of Alumnae and Guests to Caverns and Luncheon 
at College Camp 




7:30 P. M.- 


—Recital by the Departments of Music and Expression. . Wilson Hall 




9:00 P. M.- 


—Alumna- Banquet Dining Hall, Harrison I lull 

(Admission by Special Invitation) 
Address by Miss Helen Heyl, State Department of Education 

New York 

Sunday. June Seventh 




11 :00 A. M. 


— Commencement Service Sermon, by Dr. M. A. MacLean, Pastor 

College Hill Baptist Church. Lynchburg, \'a Wilson Hall 

I Admission by Ticket ) 




6:30 P. M.- 


—Vesper Service of the Y. W. C. A., Dr. Brown B. Smith. Pastor 
hirst Haptist Church, Staunton, \'a Wilson Hall 




7:30 P. M.- 


—Alumnae Buffet Dinner (Through the courtesy of the Harrison- 
burg Alumna Chapter) 

Monday, June Eighth 




10:00 A. M. 


— Alumna and College Tennis; Playday by Freshman Class 




3:30 P. M.- 


—Class Dav Exercises Wilson Hall 




4:30 P. M 


.-5:30 P. M. — Informal Reception by the Faculty to Alumna 

and Guests llumnce Hall 




8:30 P. M.- 


—Dolly Madison — Plav bv Graduating Classes Wilson Hall 

{ Admission Charge i 

T UESDA Y . \\' N E X [NT 11 




9 -00 A. M - 


— Final Exercises - - If ilson 1 1 nil 




Address by Dr. Sidney F>. Hall. Superintendent of Public Instruction, 




Richmond, \ a. 





Directory 



NAME ADDRESS 

Adams, Margaret 316 Sussex St., Lynchburg 

Adams, Thelma R Redoak 

Aldhizer, Sydney McNeill Broadway 

Alger, Verdie May Broadway 

Andes, Edith Florence Ft. I )efiance 

Argenbright, Ethel Frances Port Republic 

Arrington, Thyra Madeline Buchanan 

Arthur, Mary Lillian Aha Vista 

Ashby, Alice Agnes Remington 

Ashwell, Hazel Craghead Huddleston 

Aydlette, Angerona Elisabeth 3705 Bainbridge Blvd., Norfolk 

Ayres, Sue Frances Lee Mont 

Baily, Frieda Keffer Box 583, Crewe 

Bailey, Martha Frances Windsor 

Baker, Eleanor Briscoe Lovingston 

Baker, Jacqueline Columbia 

Baker, Sarah Augusta Capron 

Baldwin, Carolyn Judson 627 Carolina Ave., Roanoke 

Bard, Catherine Hanbury 3223 Omohundro Ave., Norfolk 

Batten, Ethel Caldwell Route 3, Staunton 

Battenfield, Isabel Linn Buckner 

Bauserman, James Edward McGaheysville 

Baylor, Minnie Blair Swoope 

Bazzarre, Hazel Jeanette Box 17, Low Moor 

Bazzle, Charles A 424 E. Wolf e St., Harrisonburg 

Beach, Mrs. Roberta 223 Randolph Ave., Danville 

Bean, Alma Lois Ballston 

Beazley, Alma Ruth Beaverdam 

Beazley, Anna Belle 324 26th St., Newport News 

Beck, Margaret Evelyn 106 North Ave., Winchester 

Becton, Julia 307 Valley St., Abingdon 

Beery, Rebecca Todd 276 Franklin St., Harrisonburg 

Beeson, Ruth Virginia Kernersville, N. C. 

Behrens, Ruth Alma Timberville 

Bell, Frances Baily Bridgetown 

Bell, Rosa Ellen Frith Bridgetown 

Bennett, Rebecca Louise 108 E. Isabelle St., Salisbury, Md. 

Beverage, Rebecca Monterey 

Biller, Elizabeth Susan Broadwaj 

Bird, Ken Mt. Jackson 

Bishop, Sallie Augusta Rawlings 

Bishop, Ruby Virginia Boydton 

Black, Lula Ellen Route 1, Lexington 

Blackwell, Nannie Frances Fine Hall, N. C. 

Blake, Gertrude Bristow Kilmarnock 

Blalock, Grace L 402 Broad St., South Boston 

Blankenhaker, Lillie Frances Madison 

Blanton, Henrietta LeGrand 226 Batten Place, Petersburg 

Blose, Gladda Marie Penn Laird 



NAME ADDRESS 

Boaz, Martha Teros Stuart 

Boggs, Mary Elizabeth Glenville, W. Va. 

Boggs, Virginia Glenville, W. Va. 

Bolton, Alice Rohrer Route 2, Harrisonburg 

Bondurant, Mary Page 1201 Ocean View Ave., Norfolk 

Bones, Lena Pulaski 

Booker, Adele Victoria Level Run 

Booker, Sally Ruth Level Run 

Booton, Catherine E Luray 

Borden, Geraldine Brown Toms Brook 

Borum, Dorothy Brooks Shadow 

Borum, Susie Smith Shadow 

Bowden, Bernice Red Hill 

Bowen, Mary Katherine Mechums River 

Bowers, Sarah Ellen 307 Virginia St., Grafton, W. Va. 

Bowman, Lera Susan Port Republic 

Bowman, Mary Catherine Route 3, Harrisonburg 

Boyd, Katherine Louise Honaker 

Boyd, Nancy Elizabeth Honaker 

Boykin, Alargaret Ann 1007 Chesapeake Ave., South Norfolk 

Bradham, Marian Elizabeth Box 304, Manning, S. C. 

Bradshaw, Lois Box S3, Crewe 

Branum, Alargaret S. High St., Harrisonburg 

Branum, Nora Route 2, Harrisonburg 

Briel, Rowena ' Route 1, Richmond 

Brock, Elva Allen 38 N. Main St., Harrisonburg 

Brooks, Edna Earl 833 Brandon Ave., Norfolk 

Brothers, Rachel Butler Whaleyville 

Brown, Annie Mae Winfall 

Brown, Gertrude Elizabeth Purcellville 

Brown, Lillian Inez 1203 N. Main St., Danville 

Brown, Kathryn Viola 911 Highland Ave., S. E., Roanoke 

Brown, Katye Wray 1145 Maple Ave., S. W., Roanoke 

Brown, Lillian Rotary Ave., Greeneville, N. C. 

Bruce, Edith Winona 1516 Columbia Rd., Washington, D. C. 

Brumback, Lola B Stephens City 

Brunk, Ruth Marie Route 4, Harrisonburg 

Buchanan, Edith Mayne East Stone Gap 

Burf oot, Mildred Aileen Fentress 

Burner, Elizabeth Virginia McGaheysville 

Burnette, Marie Leesville 

Burtncr, Mabel Stover Mt. Solon 

Burtner, Helen Esther Hinton 

Burtncr, Olga St. Mary Mt. Solon 

Burton, Eloise T Accomac 

Burton, Katie Lee Milton, N. C. 

Bush, Elizabeth 225-01 95th Ave., Bellerose, L. I., N. Y. 

Bushong, Emily Louise 202 Lake St., Pulaski 

Bussey , Kathleen Marie Stuarts Draft 

Butler, Grace Louise 1425 Oakdale Ave., Petersburg 

Butts, Kathryn Estelle 408 W. 19th St., Norfolk 



NAME ADDRESS 

By waters, Lucile Mildred Rixey\ illc 

Cameron, Laura Elizabeth Bradenton, Florida 

Campbell, Eva Gertrude New Glasgi iw 

Campbell, Jane Elizabeth Old Church 

Campbell, Mabelle A Bedford 

Campbell, Margaret Irvin Brook Hill, Richmond 

Campbell, Mrs. Victor H Harrisonburg 

Camper, Emily Blanche Buchanan 

Caplinger, Ernest Bruce Broadway 

CarickhofT, Margie Elkton 

Carmines, Pauline E 321 Armistead Ave., Hampton 

Carmines, Virginia Anne 321 Armistead Ave., Hampton 

Carr, Emma Frances Water f ord 

Carson, Mary Elizabeth 1115 Taylor St., Lynchburg 

Case, Virginia Richardson 731 Locust Ave., Charlottesville 

Cash, Jennie Mercia 625 Newton Place, N. W., Washington, I ). C. 

Cassell, Audrey Louise 522 Allison Ave., Roam ike 

Cave, Louise Luray 

Chadwick, Annie 1 lavis 325 Front St., Beaufort, N. C. 

Chappell, Lucy Harding Carson 

Chandler, Harry B Port Republic 

Childs, Christobel Orange 

Chittum, Ernestine Collierstown 

Cicerale, Marion Mary 142 26th St., Guttenberg, N. J. 

Clark, Christine Haymarket 

Clark, Sarah Kathrvn Glade Spring 

Clarke, Frances Louise 893 Line St., I lanville 

Claytor, Mae Virginia North River 

Click, Mary Evelyn Mt. Sidney 

Cline, Dortha Lottie Mt. Crawford 

Cline, Georgie Alice Box 146, Emporia 

Cloe, Mary Manning 1591) Quarrier St., Charleston, W. Va. 

Coakley, Mary Robin Mt. Clinton 

Coffman, Viola Elizabeth (R. M. Hospital), Mt. Clinton 

Coffman, Virginia Lee Edinburg 

Coleman, Alice Jane Route 1, Murat 

Coleman, Mary Venable Route 1, Murat 

Coleman, Louise Lyttleton Greenwood 

Collie, Marialyce Route 7, Danville 

Collins, Ada Elizabeth Box 117, Chincoteaguc 

Collins, Florene Stewart 203 St. Clair St., Staunton 

Collins, Georgia Virginia 9 Independence St., Cumberland, Md. 

Collins, Mary Kathleen Box 97, Dry Fork 

Comer, Ellen Rebecca 1319 Chapman Ave., S. \\ '., Roanoke 

Compher, Amanda Maxine Waterford 

Compher, Estelle Copeland Waterford 

Coney, Margaret Elizabeth 2i?< College Hill, St. Albans, W, Va. 

Cooper, Margaret Williams Critz 

Copenhaver, Lucy Haven 1 lublin 

Cordell, Ethel Isabell Fairview and Virginia Aves., Norfolk 

Cornell, 1 lorothy Louise 606 S. Main St., Harrisonburg 



NAME ADDRESS 

Cosby, Julia Estelle 3020 Dill Ave., Richmond 

Cowan, Nellie Morgan 504 Clifton St., Norfolk 

Coyner, Lucy Lee Route 2, Waynesboro 

Coyner, Mary Virginia Route 2, Waynesboro 

Coyner, Nell Virginia Route 2, Waynesboro 

Craig, Eloise Glade Spring 

Craig, Lucy Elizabeth Bassett 

Crews, Lucile Nathalie 

Crews, Ruth L 323 Yeardley Ave., Lynchburg 

Crim, Catherine Coleman New Market 

Cromwell, Dorothy Mae 4102 Granby St., Norfolk 

Crush, Rowena Cromer Fincastle 

Curry, Mary Gertrude (R. M. Hospital), Dayton 

Custis, Isabel Mason Harborton 

Dalgety-Kerr, Grace Lynchburg 

Dameron, Annie Beatrice Kinsale 

Dawson, Mildred Brown Esmont 

Davies, Elizabeth Anne Clements Ave., Ballston 

Davis, Lola Katherine 161 W. Elizabeth St., Harrisonburg 

Day, Anna Slack Vienna 

Day, Marie Frances Waugh 

Deyerle, Evelyn Byrd Campbell St., Harrisonburg 

Dickerson, Marietta 317 Franklin St., Harrisonburg 

1 )ickerson, Florence Watkins 803 N. Alain St., South Boston 

Dickerson, Mildred Elma Nathalie 

I Hckinson, Shirley Courtney 506 Stanley Ave., Roanoke 

Diehl, Ethel F McGaheysville 

1 )iehl, Frances S North River 

Diehl, Mae Virginia Route 3, Box 89, Staunton 

Dishman, Elizabeth B Marshall 

T )offlemyer, Leone S Elkton 

Dorset, Virginia 1851 Lament St., Washington, D. C. 

1 love, Clara Belle Gretna 

Dove, Dorothy Drayton Gretna 

Dovel, Camilla Kygar Rockingham 

Downey, Elizabeth Ellen Edinburg 

Drewry, Lois Agnes 701 Commercial Ave., Clifton Forge 

I iriver, Anna Arlene Mt. Clinton 

Drummond, Anna Elizabeth Pungoteague 

Dryden, Mary Karene Hornsby ville 

Duke, Julia Lois 5". T. C, Harrisonburg 

Dunford, Otey Louise 203 14th St., University of Virginia 

Dunham, Marion Warm Springs 

Dutrow, Sarah Amanda 416 10th Ave., S. W., Roanoke 

Dyche, Florence Elkton 

Early, Lena Mae 121 Patterson St., Statesville, N. C. 

Earman. Mabel Virginia Keezletown 

Edwaids, Annie Page Sweet Hall 

Efford, Pauline Agnes Farnham 

Elam, Alice Overton Gordonsvillc 

Elder, Sally Crystabelle Route 1, Burlington, N. C. 



NAME ADDRESS 

Elliot, Verona Virgie 1038 W. 27th St., Norfolk 

Ellis, Negebie Martha 130 Riverside Ave., Covington 

Ellison, Martha Elizabeth 200 Cambridge Ave., Roanoke 

Embrey, Elizabeth Thurmond Rockfish 

Emory, Rebecca E 1130 Manchester Ave., Norfolk 

English, Madeline Turpin Greenville 

English, Willie Bernice Kinsale 

Epperson, Grace Gilliam Gladys 

Estes, Myrtle Anne Burnleys 

Eubank, 1 >ora Estelle Tunstall 

Eubank, Virginia Belle 2930 Seminary Ave., Richmond 

Eure, Margaret Lee 3 Arlington Place, Lynchburg 

Evans, Julia Whiton Mt. Jackson 

Face, Sarah Emma Louise 70 Columbia Ave., Hampton 

Fansler, Eunice Estelle Orkney Springs 

Fansler, Julia Hammon Mt. Jackson 

Farinholt, Mary Waller 209 S. Jefferson St., Petersburg 

Farrar, Gladys Virginia Route 2, Rustburg 

Farrar, Marguerite Elizabeth 1708 Melrose Ave., Roanoke 

Farrar, Pauline Palmyra 

Faulconer, Nina Virginia Route 2, Box 47, Orange 

Faulkner, Marjorie Jacqueline Vienna 

Fauls, Virginia Estelle 231 Paul St., Harrisonburg 

Ferehee, Grace Estelle 1610 Morris Ave., Norfolk 

Fielder, Margaret Frances 011 Randolph St., Charleston, W. Va. 

Finlcelstein, Sadie Sylvia 316 S. Braddock St., W inchester 

Firebaugh, Kathryn Harrisonburg 

Fleming, Elva Edna Mannboro 

Flippo, Lillian May Route 3, Richmond 

Foskey, Mildred Amelia 620 Fifth St., Portsmouth 

Fox, Dorothy L Proffit 

Francis, Katherine Leigh Boykins 

Franklin, Martha Eugenia 1409 Chesapeake Ave., S. Norfolk 

Frazier, Mary Kathleen Sperryville 

Fridinger, Isabel Marguerite 23 N. Mulberry St., Hagerstown, Md. 

Fristoe, Virginia Robinson 560 S. Mason St., Harrisonburg 

Fry, Margaret W Langhorne Place, Salem 

Frye, Thelma Virginia Leesburg 

Fugate, Emily Sophia Lebanon 

Fugate, Frances Bert Lebanon 

Fugate, Mary Virginia Castlewood 

Fulk, Kathleen M (R. M. Hospital), Genoa 

Funk, Kathryn Elizabeth Middletown 

Funk, Martha N Stephens City 

Funkhouser, Lois 505 S. Mason St., Harrisonburg 

Fuqua, Mrs. Minnie Mattox Bassett 

< lambrill, Clara Margaret Barber 

Gammon, Josie Esther Hickory 

Garbee, Ida Claire Box 66, Route 5, Harrisonburg 

Garber, Catherine Louise Fort 1 (efiance 

Garland, Mildred Era Buchanan 



NAME ADDRESS 

Garrett, Edith Jane Buchanan 

Garrett, Mildred White Stone 

Garrette, Virginia Browning Lebanon 

Garth, Gladys Page Greenfield 

Garthright, Ame Potter Glen Allen 

Gatewood, Elizabeth 169 Gray St., Danville 

Gayle, Sarah Frances 821 Emmett St., Portsmouth 

Getz, Geneva Marie Getz 

Gibson, Hattie Florene Hagan 

Gibson, Maurine Florence Hagan 

Gilliam, Virginia Ruffin Prince George 

Gillie, Dorothy Eleanor 2125 Queen St., Portsmouth 

Gilmer, Cornelia Caroline Lebanon 

Gills, Jean H 47 Pine St., Petersburg 

Gimbert, Mary Elizabeth Ivy Depot 

Given, Jessie Alma 107 Burlew St., Charleston, W. Va. 

Gleason, Ida May Lovingston 

Click, Esther Virginia Route 1, Mt. Crawford 

Glick, Vesta Margaret (R. M. Hospital), Mt. Crawford 

Glover, Marjorie Sue 16 Newtown Terrace, Norwalk, Conn. 

Goode, Mary Sue Henry 

Goodrick, Virginia Lee 36 Parker Ave., Cherrydale 

Goodwin, Martha Frances Nellys Ford 

Gordon, Ellen Waters Mt. Savage, Md. 

Gordon, Mabel Baskerville 

Gore, Elizabeth Jeanette 304 West End Ave., Cambridge, Md. 

Greenwood, Virginia Jeannine Sweet Hall 

Gresham, Dorothy 541 W. Washington St., Petersburg 

Griffith, Mary Louise 207 Pine St, Charleston, W. Va. 

Grim, Sylvia Douglas 112 W. Germain St., Winchester 

Grimes, Jessie Walton Robersonville, N. C. 

Grinnan, Bessie Virginia Smithfield 

Groseclose, Sarah Emile Wytheville 

Groton, Evelyn Gladys Hallwood 

Grove, Mary Virginia Luray 

Haden, Edith Belle Nahor 

Haga, Mary M 215 Jefferson Ave., Danville 

Hailey, Zillah Margaret Keysville 

Hallet, Virginia Nottingham Cheriton 

Halterman, Bertha Catharine Palmyra 

Hamersley, Mary Sue Randolph 

Hammer, Lee Warren 261 Franklin St, Harrisonburg 

Hammond, Melvina B Lake Mahopac, N. Y. 

Hamrick, Garnet Leighton 108 North Ave, Winchester 

Hanger, Doris Lucille Middlebrook Star Route, Staunton 

Hansbarger, Margaret Lee Bluemont 

Hardy, Judith Wilson Kenbridge 

Hardy, Natalie R Pamplin 

Hardy, Ruth Box 686, Buena Vista 

Harley, Dorothy M Round Hill 

Harlin, Virginia C 227 Paul St, Harrisonburg 



NAME ADDRESS 

Harman, Ethel 397 W. Market St., Harrisonburg 

Harman, Priscilla Pauline I )ayton 

Harman, Stella Emily Elmwood, N. C. 

Harris, Anne Louise Crimora 

Harris, Betty Sallie 910 Highland Ave., S. E., Roanoke 

Harris, 1 Jorothy Louise Carson 

Harris, Edith Mae Richlands 

Harrison, Emily Caroline Route 8, Richmond 

Harvey, Alma I lonalcnc 136 Park Ave.. Schoolfield 

Hart, Mary Elizabeth Stanley 

Hart, Mary Lelia Cumin ir 

Harwell, Louise Eppes 1529 S. Sycamore St., Petersburg 

Hawthorne, Anna Leigh Kenbridge 

Heath, Mildred 1 ) Lovingston 

Hedgecock, Lillian Beatrice N49 Starling Ave., Martinsville 

Hedinger, Elizabeth Josephine Remington 

Heldreth, Madge Elizabeth Rural Retreat 

Helms, Mary Ethel Bassett 

Henderson, Louise R Brookneal 

Henderson, Mildred N. May St., Southern Pines, N. C. 

Hendricks, Anne Caroline Lebanon 

Henry, Mrs. Elenea 380 Franklin St., Harrisonburg 

Henshaw, Ruth Elizabeth Madison 

Hensley, Christine Elizabeth McGaheysville 

Hershberger, Abram \Y 1 larrisonburg 

Hess, Effie 1 )aytou 

Hibbert, Adonna North Fork, W. \'a. 

Hicks, Lillian Ava Evington 

Hinebaugh, Katherine Alberta 702 Maryland St., Cumberland, Md. 

Hinebaugh, Marion ( irey Clifton Forge 

Hines, Lois Hoyt 833 Stokes St., I lanville 

Hinkel, Madeline Markham 

Hinton, Virginia Bluefield 

Hisey, Hilda Gwynette Edinl>urg 

Hobbs, Vivian Rose Hill 

Hobson, Louise A 401 Rosalind Ave., Roanoke 

Hockman, Jenny Lind Lucas 5 S. Washington St., Winchester 

Holland, Eva Bernice Eastville 

Holland, Lillian Alexander Route 1, Box 27, Wilmington 

Holsinger, Martha Harrisonburg 

Holsinger, Virginia Hess Route 4, Harrisonburg 

Holt, Beulah H Cullen 

Holt, Ruth Virginia 115 Fifth St., N. E., Washington. I). C. 

Holter, Mary William Route 5, Frederick, Md. 

Hooks, Louise Crawford Warsaw, X. C. 

Hopkins, Margaret Reeves St. Michaels, Md. 

Hopkins, Mary Elizabeth Elkton 

Houser, Elizabeth E Stanley 

I louser, Frances Nell Stanley 

I lowed, Margaret Catherine Low Moor 

Hubbard, Lucy E White Stone 



NAME ADDRESS 

Hulburd, Francene 209 S. Goodman St., Rochester, N. Y. 

Hudgins, Georgie Elva Shadow 

Hudson, Susie Elizabeth 148 S. Court St., Luray 

Humphries, Laura Ellen Masonic Home, Richmond 

Humphries, Nettie Mae Masonic Home, Richmond 

Hunter, Maude Irvine 1229 14th St., Hickory, N C. 

Hunter, Virginia Jewell 168 Gray St., Danville 

Hurst, Ida Delphine 402 Elm Place, Norfolk 

Hutchison, Georgia Anita 223 N. Broad St., Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Hutton, Scott Clay Broadway 

Hyde, Alary Virginia 529 Fairmont Ave., Winchester 

Inge, Latisha Belle Sycamore 

Ingle, Jeannette Cuttle 810 N. Main St., South Boston 

Jackson, Hunter L McGaheysville 

James, Margaret Sangster White Stone 

James, Martha Lou (R. M. Hospital), Maurertown 

Johnson, Sarah Frances 321 Pine St., Clifton Forge 

Johnston, Jaquelyn S. T. C, Harrisonburg 

Jones, Gertrude Elizabeth Getz 

Jones, Alary Elizabeth Spring Grove 

Jones, Hazel Alise Wicomico Church 

Jones, Iva Lou 1313 22nd St., Newport News 

Jones, Sara Alargaret Spring Grove 

J ones, Virginia Graves Gordonsville 

Joyce, Lena Sue Critz 

Joyce, Lucille Bassett 

Julian, Gladys Elizabeth East Stone Gap 

Justice, Andrey Elizabeth 125 Alleghany St., Clifton Forge 

Kagey, Elizabeth Anne Mt. Jackson 

Karnes, Hilda Alaxine Shenandoah 

Kay, Alice Alae 700 Chestnut Ave., Waynesboro 

Kearney, Lelia Rose 324 W. Olney Road, Norfolk 

Keeler, Hellyn Virginia 319 W. Leicester St., Winchester 

Keenan, Janet Helen 1467 Las Cruces Ave., Balboa, Canal Zone 

Keller, Alartha Louise Fishers Hill 

Kerr, Elizabeth Chandler 306 Franklin St., Harrisonburg 

Kidd, Thelma Alalinda Route 2, Bedford 

Kilgore, Anna Belle Coeburn 

Killinger, Maybelle Inez Rural Retreat 

Kingsolver, A. Elizabeth 50 Wheeler Ave., Clarendon 

Kiser, Salome Bridgewater 

Kite, Doris Ellen (R. M. Hospital), Shenandoah 

Kline, Hazel Frances Broadway 

Knicely, Sara Bell (R. M. Hospital), Lyndhurst 

Knight, Helen Virginia Marion 

Krouse, Marianna Elizabeth 133 Brookside Ave., Irvington, N. J. 

Lackey, Alargaret AIcKee 301 Jefferson St., Lexington 

Lambert, Lillian Alerle Stephens City 

Lambert, Nancy Carter Bridgewater 

Land, Frances Ogden 1003 North Alain St., Danville 

Landes, Vesta Grace Harrisonburg 

LaNeave, Frances Aliller r 306 E. Caroline Ave., Crewe 



NAME ADDRESS 

Lasley, Mary Kathryn Zion 

Lawson, Mary Louise 1310 Bridge Ave., Charleston, W. Va. 

Leatherbury, Rebecca Waddy Eastville 

Leavell, C. Madeline Weyers Cave 

Leech, Thelma Wade Lexington 

Leith, Sue Lavinia Aldie 

Lemmon, Sarah McCulloh 101 Seminole I Irive, Marietta, Georgia 

Lewis, Mildred Clyde 900'/ 2 Green St., Danville 

Linhos, Brownye C 1 Jayton 

Linhos, Selina Mildred I layton 

Logan, Margaret L Box 535, Harrisonburg 

Longe, Sadie Mae Middletown 

Lovett, Ethel Esther 2806 Norfolk Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Lowance, Alma Virginia Hillsboro, W. Va. 

Lowman, Mayre Hotingcr Hillsboro 

I .i iwman, Mary Katheryn Pulaski 

Lowrie, Janet Morris Central Mercedita, I'inar del Rio, Cuba 

Lutz, Majorie Virginia Orkney Springs 

Lyttle, Nora Lee Coeburn 

McCallum, Edith Louise Faber 

McComb, Louise Winston Stuarts Draft 

MacCorkle, Constance Old Fields, W . Va. 

McCormick, Sallie Elizabeth Williamsville 

McCue, Sarah Winters Mt. Sidney 

McElfresh, Eloise 103 Main I Irive, Charleston, \V. Va. 

MacKenzie, Marion 125 W. Princess Anne Road, Norfolk 

McFaddin, .Mary Lou Lebanon 

McFarland, Virgie Irene Berryville 

Mel iee, Elsie Juanita Box 71, Vinton 

McGhee, Frances Walthall 109 Oxford Ave., Roanoke 

Mc( in If in, Elizabeth Lee Warm Springs 

McGuire, Edith Palmer Wolf Trap 

McMellon, Janie Louise 898 Starling Ave., Martinsville 

McNeeley, Helen Shelton Route 2, Danville 

McNeil, Ruth Gillespie Fishersville 

McPherson, Ann Lynden Buchanan 

Maddox, Elizabeth Louisa 

Maloy, Georgia Frances McDowell 

Manby, Myrtle Louise 1244 44th St., Norfolk 

Manke, Catherine Frederica 25 Willow St., Hampton 

Mapp, Mae Louise Nassawadox 

Marino, Nancy 903 N. Augusta St., Staunton 

Markham, Catherine Lucrece 125 Hatton St., Portsmouth 

Marshall, Sallie Christine Crewe 

Marshall, Hazel Magnolia Stony Point 

Martin, Dorothy Alice 637 Massachusetts Ave., Norfolk 

Martin, Guy Nell Bowersx ille, Georgia 

Martz, Margaret Mae New Market 

Martz, Martha Catherine New Market 

Masengill, Frances Elizabeth 812 Shirley Ave., Norfolk 






./ 



NAME ADDRESS 

Mason, Elva Virginia Louisa 

Mason, Mary Agnes Baskerville 

Massie, Susie Maude Roseland 

Matthews, Frances Ann 209 Belvedere Ave., Cambridge, Md. 

Matthews, Nell S Charlie Hope 

Mauzy, Margaret Elizabeth McGaheysville 

May, Minnie Bergton 

Meador, Essie Lee Cartersville 

Mears, Margaret Lee Cheriton 

Meeks, Eunice 500 Mt. Holly St., Baltimore, Md. 

Meelheim, Elise Katrine 309 Palen Ave., Hilton Village 

Melchor, Laura Ann 943 Lynwood Ave., Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Melson, Marietta Machipongo 

Meyerhoffer, Mattie R Port Republic 

Miles, Audrey Louise S3 S. Main St., Chincoteaque 

Miller, Jane Helm Stony Point 

Miller, Lula Mae Mt. Solon 

Miller, Maxine M (R. M. Hospital), Jerome 

Miller, Ruth Elizabeth Moores Store 

Miller, Shirley Elizabeth Edinburg 

Minnick, Sara Catherine Timberville 

Minor, Rebecca Maria Route 1, Box 9, Lightfoot 

Mitchell, Grace Lois Boxwood 

Mitchell, Lula A Draper, N. C. 

Moore, Amy Babcock Hagerstown, Md. 

Moore, Ann Route 1, Portsmouth 

Moore, Eleanor Holt Fairmont Park, Gastonia, N. C. 

Moore, Elizabeth Rebecca 522 Massachusetts Ave., Norfolk 

Moore, Margaret Rebecca , 523 W. 37th St., Norfolk 

Moore, Hazel I Bridgewater 

Moore, Martha Katherine Timberville 

Moore, Mary Ann 55 Linden Ave., Hampton 

Moore, Mary Ethel Chatham 

Morgan, Kathryn Elizabeth Box 202, Berryville 

Morgan, Mary Virginia New Point 

Morris, Hallie Irene Geer 

Mossburg, Ella Mae Sellman, Md. 

Motley, Edna Virginia Depot St., Chatham 

Myers, Elizabeth Brown 288 Franklin St., Harrisonburg 

Myers, Gladys Virginia Timberville 

Neal, Louise Thomas Ringgold 

Neal, Mildred Kindred Emporia 

Neblett, Frances Rebecca Victoria 

Needy, Dorothy Virginia 29 Broadway St., Hagerstown, Md. 

Nelson, Judith Hannah 1228 N. Augusta St., Staunton 

Newbill, Madaline Chandler 273 Newman Ave., Harrisonburg 

Newcomb, Mattie Hazel Formosa 

Newman, Ruth Cleveland Thaxton 

Newman, Virginia Baskerville 

Nichols, Mary Ann Purcellville 

Oakes, Chloe Peck 519 Lincoln Ave., Roanoke 



















NAME ADDRESS 

(lakes, Jane Elizabeth Gladys 

Obenshain, Ethel Virginia Buchanan 

Ogden, Gladys Natural Bridge Station 

Ogline, Gladys Mae Route 5, Somerset, Penn. 

Orange, Irma Acree Exmore 

Orange, Virginia Exmore 

Ott, Rosa Lee Juanita 281 Newman Ave., Harrisonburg 

Ours, Ruth Spitzer Hinton 

Owen, Lemma Wilson Leesville 

( (wen, Rosa Slade Stony Creek 

Palmer, Edna T Sweet Hall 

Parker, Alice Frances Robersonville, N. C. 

Parker, Katherine Virginia 144 Melwood Ave., Cherrydale 

Payne, Idah Noreen Berryville 

Payne, Margaret Brent White Stone 

Payne, Sarah Margaret 425 Washington Ave., Roanoke 

Pearson, Harriet Atkinson 305 National Ave., Winchester 

Pence, Frances Ellen North River 

Pennington, Ella Cleo Pennington Gap 

Ferryman, Sarah Pauline 1800 S. Main St., Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Peterson, Emilyn 224 E. Camp St., Lake City, Fla. 

Pettit, Virginia L 827 W'illett Ave., Clarendon 

Peyton, Elspeth Hall Ethel 

Phillippi, Verna Gaye Rural Retreat 

Phipps, Mattie Elizabeth Mouth of Wilson 

Pierce, Kathryn Elizabeth Rectortown 

Pierce, Sue Rectortown 

Plank, Mary Elizabeth Fincastle 

Pointer, M. Maxine Bridges 

Powell, Harriet Edmunds McKenney 

Powers, Janie Estelle Lexington 

Powers, Ruby Madeline Route 3, Staunton 

Poyner, Hortense Knotts Island, N. C. 

Price, Rhoda Taylor Wirtz 

Puller, Ruby Merriel 1 (ejarnette 

Purdum, Laura 9 Littlefield Ave., Hyattsville, Md 

Quick, Robbie Charleen Crozet 

Quillin, Doris Gate City 

Quisenberry, Elise 507 Belleville Road, Roanoke 

Quisenberry, Mildred G Box 103, Mineral 

Ralston, Sara Frances 317 E. Beverly St., Staunton 

Ramsay, Clyde Bassett 

Ramsey, Dorothy Inez Pedlar Mills 

Ransone, Lottie Morris Buchanan 

Rawls, Sarah Elizabeth 603 I ) St., South Norfolk 

Reade, Ercelle Bragg 103 S. Jefferson St., Petersburg 

Revercomb, Lois Weaver Peola Mills 

Revercomb, Merle (R. M. Hospital), Peola Mills 

Reynolds, Lena Wilson Route 3, Roanoke 

Reynolds, Virginia Frances Sinking Creek 

Rhodes, Dorothy Ellen Middletown 



NAME ADDRESS 

Rhoades, Edna Elizabeth Culpeper 

Richards, Virginia Irving The Elms, Valley Pike, Winchester 

Richardson, Sallie A Rents Store 

Richeson, Sarah Elizabeth Amherst 

Riddle, Virginia Ellen Broadway 

Ritcnour, Lucy Frances 312 W. Leicester St., Winchester 

Roach, Ida Virginia 315 Bryant Ave., Danville 

Roark, Alary Louise Nathalie 

Roberson, Nina Olive 2927 Bapaume Ave., Norfolk 

Rodes, Airs. Christine L 357 Franklin St., Harrisonburg 

Rodes, Dorothy Helen Greenwood 

Rogers, Rachel McVeigh Cedar St., East Falls Church 

Rolley, Winnie Annette Cheriton 

Rollins, Dorothy Virginia Waterford 

Rolston, Mary Frances Mt. Clinton 

Roop, Sarah Virginia Lexington 

Rose, Geraldine Lillian 609 Main St., Covington 

Rothgeb, Edna (R. M. Hospital), Route 5, Luray 

Rowan, Margaret Kathryn Bridgewater 

Ruby, Virginia Kling 242 Cleveland Ave., Lynchburg 

Rucker, Margaret Ramey Delaplane 

Rush, Helen Kathryn Ill S. Main St., Woodstock 

Rushing, Mrs. Bessie Flick Dayton 

Rust, Farah Cathryn 501 Spruce St., Appalachia 

Rust, V. Gertrude Flint Hill 

Salmond, Anne Kennedy 1106 Oakmont Ave., Charleston, W. Va. 

Sanders, Linda •... White Stone 

Sanders, Rachel Graham Chilhowie 

Sanf ord, Anne Rebekah Tucker Hill 

Sanford, Mary Ellen Tucker Hill 

Sanger, Mary Virginia Route 2, Dayton 

Saunders, Alice Virginia Carson 

Saunders, Mrs. Esther W Tappahannock 

Schuler, Blanche Elizabeth Broadway 

Schwarz, Azile Howard 495 Jefferson St., Danville 

Sellers, Margaret C Island Ford 

Shank, Georgia Virginia 272 Newman Ave., Harrisonburg 

Shank, Virginia L North River 

Shankle, Mary Catherine Buckeyetown, Md. 

Shaver, Helen Elizabeth 223 Campbell St., Harrisonburg 

Shaver, Janie Elizabeth 299 Franklin St., Harrisonburg 

Shaver, Mary Lucile 299 Franklin St., Harrisonburg 

Shaw, Charlotte Ann Box 98, Kershaw, S. C. 

Shelton, Eva Frances Route 2, Norfolk 

Shenk, Kathryn Louise Kimball 

Shepherd, Margaret E 3016 Memorial Ave., Lynchburg 

Shiflet, Margaret Virginia Harrisonburg 

Shipe, Caroline Oreta Middletown 

Shoemaker, Louise H Broadway 

Showalter, Joyce Virginia Iron Gate 

Shrum, Dorothy Rebecca Woodstock 






NAME ADDRESS 

Shrum, Georgia R Harrisonburg 

Shryock, Mildred McKnett Stephens City 

Shryock, Sarah E Stephens City 

Shultz, Emma Jane 302 N. New St., Staunton 

Shumate, Alma Paxson Box 112, Harrisonburg 

Sifford, Sally Aileen 1542 Versailles Ave., Norfolk 

Simpson, Mildred 619 Perm Ave., Norfolk 

Smith, Eliza Norfleet 307 Cedar St., Suffolk 

Smith, Helen Dillwyn 

Smith, Mary Elizabeth Taft 

Smith, Margaret Terrell 1431 Mallory Court, Norfolk 

Smith, Wellford Charles Town, W. Va. 

Smithey, E. Marguerite Mt. Williams 

Snapp, R. Kathleen Middletown 

Snyder, Frances I lidcoct 400 Stanley Ave, Roanoke 

Somers, Gwynn Burkeville 

Somers, Virginia Heath Burkeville 

Spencer, Delma Alice Covel, W. Va. 

Spencer, Dorothy Frances 905 Bridge Ave., Charleston, W. Va. 

Spitzer, Mary Rebecca 486 W. Market St., Harrisonburg 

Spooner, Prudence Hains 116 S. High St., Franklin 

Sprinkle, Ethel K 492 S. Mason St., Harrisonburg 

Stark, Virginia Jordan 3 Erin Apt., 718 Redgate Ave., Norfolk 

Steele, Barbara I )enham Main St., Stephens City 

Steele, Emma Lee ( R. M. Hospital), Route 4, Harrisonburg 

Steele, Margie Biedler ( R. M. Hospital), Harrisonburg 

Steele, Vada Evelyn Route 4, Harrisonburg 

Stephenson, Florence Elizabeth 113 Hough Ave., Norfolk 

Stephenson, Ruth Bradley 544 High St., Petersburg 

Stephenson, Verice Mae Ivor 

Stern, Virginia Laidley Box 918, Charleston, W. Va. 

Stewart, Lois Mildred Burnsville, W. Va. 

Stickley, Iola Cornelia Strasburg 

Stickley, Louise Reliance 

Stover, Ella Antrim 1214 Eye St., N. W., Washington, 1 >. C. 

Strailman, Virginia Lee 1709 Scales St., Raleigh, N. C. 

Stratton, Caroline Barbour Gordonsville 

Stultz, Evelyn Mae Route 6, Harrisonburg 

Sugden, Elizabeth McClean 46 Marrow St., Hampton 

Sullivan, Anna Lyons 71 Broad St., Harrisonburg 

Sullivan, Josephine E Beldor 

Surber, Martha Bowles 522 Rose St., Clifton Forge 

Swartz, Mary Virginia Louisa 

Sweeney, Frances Pauline Evington 

Swink, Alice Benson Route 4, Box 207, Norfolk 

Swope, Lottie C Mt. Clinton 

Sykes, Evelyn Cofer Smithfield 

Tate, Maria Louise Saxe 

Tate, Janie Margaret Saxe 

Tate, Margaret Russell Lebanon 

Tate, Mildred Ruth Lebanon 









.NAME ADDRESS 

Taylor, Margaret Virginia Hallwood 

Taylor, Mary Jeannette Hallwood 

Taylor, Nelle Mae East Stone Gap 

Temple, Ethel Kathleen Brodnax 

Terry, Marian Elizaheth Sangerfield, N. Y. 

Thomas, Andrew J Cootes Store 

Thomas, Beulah Virginia 1616 Barron St., Portsmouth 

Thomas, Martha Kathryn Grant 

Thomas, Margaret Elizaheth 1026 Harrington Ave., Norfolk 

Thomas, Alary Elizaheth Route 1, Box 85, Dayton 

Thompson, Cathleen Virginia White Post 

Thompson, Eloise Sloan Crewe 

Thompson, Margaret Roberta 312 S. Main St., Harrisonburg 

Thompson, Mary Anna Route 5, Box 25, Harrisonburg 

Thurston, May Rebecca Box 343, Buena Vista 

Thweatt, Louise Jones 1771 Westover Ave., Petersburg 

Tinsman, Elsie Hackley North Fork 

Tolley, Florence Helen Lexington 

Townsend, Ethel Smith Cheriton 

Trott, Anne Radford Fort Defiance 

Tucker, Ida Katherine Lovingston 

Tucker, Lillie Ola Crewe 

Tucker, Mrs. Mercye C Singers Glen 

Tucker, Wilma Cary Drakes Branch 

Tudor, Mary Elizabeth 420 Lexington Ave., Thomasville, N. C. 

Turner, Alma Maude Stanardsville 

Turner, Mary Lois Alton 

Turner, Virgelia Arinthia Nassawadox 

Turner, Virginia Valeria Stone Mt. 

Turner, Vivien Brj'an Wimike Apts,, Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Turner, Willie Frances (R. M. Hospital), Cootes Store 

Turpin, Helen Mae Big Island 

Tutwiler, Mary Elizabeth (R. M. Hospital), Harrisonburg 

Twyf ord, Catherine Wardtown 

Ullrich, Harriet Agatha 1811 Arlington Ave., Norfolk 

Lmderwood, Alice Evelyn North Fork 

Vance, Dorris Wilbur Fentress 

VanPelt, Lois Florence Sharps 

VanPelt, Opal Jane Singers Glen 

Vellines, Lucie Macon 4536 Washington Ave., Newport News 

Via, Barbara Naomi Earlysville 

Wade, Mary Alice Raphine 

Walker, Edith Ruth Chatham 

Walker, Lillian Ideal Chatham 

Walker, Margaret Ellen Box 186, Pearisburg 

Wall, Eleanor Virginia Blacksburg 

Wampler, Catherine 136 W. Elizabeth St., Harrisonburg 

Warren, Elizabeth Shipman Timber Lake Road, Route 1, Lynchburg 

Warren, Martha Freeman Timber Lake Road, Route 1, Lynchburg 

Watkins, Evelyn Virginia 915 E. 26th St., Norfolk 

W'atkins, Sarah Louise Kents Store 



NAME ADDRE^ 

Watson, Jessie Elizabeth Mt. Sidney 

Watt, -Mary (.race 1031 S St., N. W., Washington, D, C, 

Watt, Ruth Ellen 1119 Hickory Ave., Charleston, W. Va. 

W'eadon, Alary Mildred W'aterford 

Weast, Charlotte I Crozet 

Webb, Lavinia Alice Disputanta 

We, 1. lie, Ruth Hill Hillsville 

West, Margaret Frances 6 Colonial Apt., Norfolk 

West, Margaret Scarborough Poolesville, Mil. 

Western, Ruth Rebecca Fort Defiance 

Wetmore, Lucille Virginia 824 Palace Blvd., Clifton Forge 

W'herrett, Catherine Elizabeth 657 First View St., Norfolk 

White, Marye Evelyn Lexington 

Whitehead, Helen Gibson 3214 Oraohundro Ave., Norfolk 

Whitman, Frances Earle R. F. I )., Purcell ville 

W'hittington, Ruth Imogene Mattoax 

Wick, Helen G 802 Maple Road. Charleston. W, Va. 

Wiley, Mary P Mill Gap 

W'ilkins, Eleanor Mae Capeville 

Wilkinson, Elizabeth Carson 

Williams, I Jorothy Elizabeth 1600 W. 50th St., Norfolk 

Williams, Grace Althea 607 Wycliffe Ave., S. R, Roanoke 

Williams, Mary Blanche 1102 Rogers St., South Norfolk 

Williamson, Louisa G Bluefield 

Wilson, Evelyn A 3406 Hawthorn Ave., Richmond 

Wilson, Gladys Bussey 200 Marion Ave., Clarendon 

Wilson, Norma Frances Big Stone Gap 

Wine, Louise Route 1, Waynesboro 

Wine, Mary Susan Forestville 

Winston, Lois Watson Hampden-Sidney 

Wire, Loretta Sue Lovettsville 

Wise, Elizabeth Lillian New Market 

Wise, Loraine Route 6, Harrisonburg 

Wood, Clarice Kathleen 137 Woodlawn St., Beckley, W. Va. 

W'i iod, Frances Rose Route 3, Box 165, Petersburg 

Wood, Hazel C Route 3, Box 165, Petersburg 

Woodcock, Esther Virginia 819 Washington St., Hampton 

Wooddell, Christena Malcolm McDowell 

Wooding, Josephine B Halifax 

Woodroof, Margaret F 708 Harrison St., Petersburg 

W'renn, Eleanor Ashby Edinburg 

Wright, Jessie MacDougall 8th St., Willoughby Beach, Norfolk 

W right, Mattie Marie Arcadia 

Wright, Mary Eleanor Kents Store 

Wright, Mildred Akers Bassett 

Wright, Nellie Kathleen Hill Terrace, Waynesboro 

W'yatt, Ida Josephine 110 White St., Lexington 

W'yatt, Lila Price Mount Airy 

Wyatt, Louise Elizabeth Mount Airy 

Yancey, Lillian Amanda Route 3, Harrisonburg 

Zehmer, Virginia McKenney 

Zimmerman, Beth Lake Spring, Salem 









288^mJS2mJSSSS2M8X8S£8-8«8^^ 



/ he Best and Largest Place in Town 
4 — OPERATORS — 4 

Permanents Marcelling 

Comb-waves 
Finger-waves Hair-cutting 




A Perfect Fit 
fill Keep You Fit 

LOVETT BROS. 
"X-RAY SHOE FITTERS" 

Harrisunliurg 

Staunton Virginia Winchester 

Shenandoah Valley's 

LEADING SHOE STORES 



THE SCHOOLMA'AM STAFF WISHES TO CALL ATTENTION 
TO THE FOLLOWING FACTS REGARDING 



THE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

H A R R I S O N B U R G, V I R G I N 1 A 



Member Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools of tin 
Southern Slates 



Class "A" Member American Association of Teachers Colleges 

Established by the General Assembly 1908 

Annual enrollment. 1.300 

Faculty of 60 well-trained and experienced college teachers 

Located in the Shenandoah Valley 

Elevation 1.300 feet 

Campus of 60 acres 

Beautiful mountain environment 

Sixteen college buildings 

Total value college plant $1,600,000 

Both city and rural training schools 

Athletic field and tennis courts 

Two gymnasiums. NineTiole golf course 

Two swimming pools (indoor and outdoor) 

College Camp on Shenandoah River 



mmmmmmmmmmmzmmmmmmmm^^ 



E. R. MILLER, M. I). 

Practice Limited to 

EYE EAR NOSE THROAT 

Second Flour Professional Building 

Hundred Seventy South Main Street 

Office 416 PHONES Res. 588 

R A L P H'S 

Advanced Styles for Women 

COATS DRESSES HATS 

UNDERWEAR HOSIERY 

NEGLIGEES SCARFS 

NOVELTIES 

10%— Off for College Girls— 10% 
Main Street 

Harrisonburg : : : : Virginia 




u— s— E 

Valley Gold Dairy Products 

Milk Cream Cheese Butter 
Ice Cream 

Farmers and Merchants 
Dairy Company 

Harrisonburg : : : : : : Virginia 

J. C. PENNEY COMPANY 

1500 Stores Serve 1500 

COMMUNITIES 

by 

The Golden Rule 

The Farther You Go From One, The 
Closer You Get To Another 

Harrisonburg : : : : Virginia 



£S3$rnm£8m£8K8£3sa8s8s8£3«^^ 



BURKE & PRICE 



INSURANCE- 



LIFE 

FIRE 

HEALTH 

BONDING 

ACCIDENT 

AUTOMOBILE 

—The National Bank Building 



Harrisimliur 



i ^mmmsaxmm^ssmmi: 



SHENANDOAH STAGES 



Safety Courtesy 




WASHINGTON KNOXVILLE 



Coaches Chartered For All Occasions 



operated— THE TOWNS WAY— WITH 



Dependability 



JB£8*8s«838s8s8S8J8s8Km8^^ 




mmmsmm^m^msmmmssmmm 



THE 

KAVANAUGH 
HOTEL 



The Kavanaugh is the largest and 
finest hotel in the heart of the 
Valley and is closer to all the 
Caverns than any other hotel in 
Virginia. The Kavanaugh is 
strictly modern and up-to-date, 
with a service second to none, for 
the traveler and tourist. Rooms 
with or without bath. Golf privi- 
leges. Make the Kavanaugh your 
headquarters. 



J. M. KAVANAUGH 

PROPRIETOR 

Harrisonburg : : : : Virginia 



THE 

HAWKINS 

HARDWARE CO 




Wholesale and Retail 



HEAVY and SHELF 



HARDWARE 



HARRISONBURG 



VIRGINIA 



?BS3s858»38i8e8i&3a8s82S8a8^^ 



LILIAN GOCHENOUR 

M I L L I N ER 
DISTINCTIVE MILLI1 
for all occasions 

BLUE 
M () O N 

HOSE 
102 South Mam Street 

124 East Market Street 
Harrisonburg, \ lrgtma 




Florists— J. E. I'LECKER and COMPANY— Florists 

619 Collicello Street — — I'lione 38 — — Harrisonburg, \ a. 

Massanutten Caverns 

FIVE MILES FROM HARRISONBURG 




A Thousand Colors and Formations Decorate the Ballroom 



W. T. GRANT 
COMPANY 



SCHEIE L'S 
Fli RNITURE 



ISIS 

HOSE 

Service Weight Sheer Chiffon 

Complete Stocks of Latest Shades 



COURT 
SQUARE 



HARRISONBURG 



VIRGINIA 



HARRISONBURG 



V 



R G I N I A 



5:s8°8S8§858°8S8!8Km$8$S^ 



The COVER on this book 

is the product of an organization 

of specialists whose sole work is 

the creation of unusual covers for 

School Annuals, Set Books, Histories, 

Catalogues, Sales Manuals and 

other Commercial Publications 

■» ■ ■ - ■ » * 

THE DAVID J. MOLLOY CO. 

2857 Norra Tfjestern Avenue 
CHICAGO 




Do you get 
bull value? 

i"our telephone con 
nects you with the rest 
of your community. It 
also will put you in 
touch with anyone you 
desire in any other lo- 
cality. The various 
classes of ton g Dis- 
tance service and the 
rates will be gladly ex 
plained. 

USE LONG DISTANCE 



Harrisonburg 

Mutual Telephone 

Company 



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W. L. FIGGATT 

Phones 365—366 Phones 365—366 

T H F. MO S T S A X I T A K Y M FAT .1/ A R K F T 

COMPLETE LINE OF 

Groceries Fresh Fruits Vegetables 

OUR MEATS ARE COOLED BY MECHANICAL REFRIGERATION 

THE 

National Bank of Harrisonburg 

MEMBER OF FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 

SAFETY and SERVICE 

SHENANDOAH CAVERNS 

Where Nature Smiles iu Strata 

ANNOUNCES 

the installation of a modern elevator which transports visitors from 
surface to subterranean depths in twenty seconds, a journey covering 
countless thousands of years in a third of a minute. Nature perfected 
the beauty of Shenandoah Caverns, and the elevator perfects the service 
in making them available to the visitor, with no fatigue and in less time. 
Conceded by tens of thousands of enthusiastic visitors to be the world's 
best lighted, most beautiful, and most accessible Caverns, the elevator 
service makes them the easiest to see. Let us number you among the 
thousands of visitors from all over the world who will visit, and have 
visited. Shenandoah Caverns. 

EXCELLENT HOTEL SERVICE 

SHENANDOAH CAVERNS, VIRGINIA 



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Tht 



College . . . Place . . .to 



. Meet 



an 



d . . . Eat 



S 



ANITARY 
ODA 

ANDf ICH 
HOPPE 



Our 10c Specials are Hard to Beat! 
Our Plate Lunches are All You can Eat! 



play the radio and 



THE LATEST RECORDS 



SERVICE 

WITH A 

SMILE 

'Your Patronage Here is Appreciated" 



You Need Not 

be 
Extravagant 

to be 

W ell Dressed 

and 

Stylish 




At the very moment a New Creation in Apparel 

for Miss or Matron becomes Style — then 

you will see it in this great store. 

— Always the Newest in SHOES and Apparel — 

JOSEPH NEY & SONS CO. 



5s8!(8m«8e«S88828-85S^«^ 



WHEN you are in quest of ex- 
traordinarily fine Ice Cream, 
please be assured that you will al- 
ways have your highest conceptions 
gratified if you depend upon 




You will find that the Artful Blending 
of Flavors with Pure Sweet Cream and 
Cane Sugar has been attained to a de- 
gree which permits us to insure you the 
same Uniform, Perfectly Balanced 
oducl from day to day . . . month 



prod 

to month 



and 



. year to year. 



As is tkue of Imperial Ice Cream 

You May be Equally Confident of 

the Fine Fresh Flavor, Richness 

and Silk-Like Texture of 

SHENANDOAH 
VALLEY BUTTER 

This Butter Supreme has attained and 
retains its leadership with thousands of 
families year in and year out, and the 
confidence of the STATE TEACHERS 
COLLEGE STUDENTS in the quality 
of Shenandoah Valley Butter is a 
heritage we prize. 

IMPERIAL ICE CREAM 
COMPANY 

EXCLUSIVE 
DISTRIBUTORS OF 

LOfNEY'S CANDIES 



TO THE STUDENT BODY 
STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE: 

We have endeavored to make 
the term just closing both pleas- 
ant and profitable to you from a 
merchandising standpoint. Tin- 
large number of students zvho 
have made our store b u y i ;/ </ 
headquarters has, indeed, been 
gratifying to us. 

It is our wish that you remem- 
ber us after you have reached 
your homes. Our Mail Order 
Department is ever at your eom- 
manc 




PERFECT PROTECTION 

S-F.-E 

THOMAS L. YANCEY, JR. 

District Manager 

MASSACHUSETTS MUTUAL 

LIFE INSURANCE 

COMPANY 

308 First National Bank 
Phone 10411 

C. B. Richardson, General Agent 
Richmond, Virginia 



—Established 1888— 
A QUARTER-CENTURY— of— COLLEGE PHOTOGRAPHY 




220 West Forty-Second Street 
NEW YORK 



COMPLETELY EQUIPPED to RENDER the HIGHEST OUALITY 

CRAFTSMANSHIP and an EXPEDITED SERVICE on'BOTH 

PERSONAL PORTRAITURE and PHOTOGRAPHY 

for COLLEGE ANNUALS 

Official Photographer to the "1931 Schoolma'am" 



&m8§8®88mmem£838®88m%& 



The Dean Studio 



(operating nearly half a century) 



Harrisonburg; 




FOTOS 

FRAMES 

FINISHING 

FOR FASTIDIOUS FOLKS 

7/i Photographs Only Can Yesterdays Live." 



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llways in the Lead zvith 

Nationally Advertised 

Merchandise 



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THE 



FRANKLIN 
C O M P A N Y 



Q U A L I T Y 



FRESH 



FANCY 



AND 


AND 


CURED 


STAPLE 


MEATS 


i ;ri h fries 



J. II. Driver 

Harrisonburg, Virginia 



"Lifetime Furniture" 



I [ARRISONBURG S 

BEST 

FURNITURE and MUSIC 
ST( )RE 




in our every-day life if we want to look 
well dressed at a slight expense. We will 
clean your suits, waists, skirts, etc., so 
they will look as good as new, press out 
the wrinkles, and when desired will dye 
any garment in fast colors that won't 
wash out. Look over your wardrobe 
and see if we can't make it fresher. 

HAYDEN'S DRY CLEANING 
WORKS 

Phone 274 

165 North Main Street 

Harrisonburg : : Virginia 



D L P 




.Automatic Presses 



RESS 



Expressive Typography — Printing of Distinction 

East Water Street Telephone 519-J 

Harrisonburg, Virginia 



CHE V RO LET 



C H E V R L E T 



OUR — 

COMPLETE, DEPENDABLE SERVICE INSURES SATISFACTION 
LINEWEAVER MOTOR COMPANY, Inc. 

Harrisonburg, Virginia 



IN THEIR OPERATION OF 




The Virginia Theatre 



ARE EVER THOUGHTFUL OF 



THE PATRONAGE OF 



THE STUDENT 



'Warner Bros. Service is Never a Selfish Service." 



S8t8*88888°8S8*8°88S8§8°^^ 



THE BANK WITH TWO INTERESTS— THREE PER CENT AND PERSONAL 




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The School Annual 



TT T E DO not think— not publicly, at least— that 
1/^ we are the only people who print school an- 
nuals properly. Many printers do as good 
work as we, and a few do better, perhaps. But those 
that do better, charge a great deal more. We believe we 
are the second largest printers of annuals in Virginia. 
We know that year after year we print the same books, 
which indicates that our customers like our work. Fur- 
thermore we usually do any new annual that is put out 
in our territory, which indicates that our work is appre- 
ciated where we are best known. We always strive to 
carry out intelligently and in good taste the theme a staff 
selects. "Intelligence," "good taste," what wonderful 
words are these when applied to an annual. They mean 
'that the printer is to enter into the spirit of the work and 
transfer to the printed page the vision of beauty pictured 
in the mind of the editor. The}' mean that he is to guard 
the staff against the visionary, the gaudy, and the need- 
lessly expensive, by constructive and conscientious advice. 



The McClure Company 

Incorporated 
19 West Frederick Street : : Staunton, Virginia 



The McClure Company, 
Staunton, Va. 







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